Tag: Education (K-12)

CDC Officials Say Evidence Indicates Schools Can Reopen If Precautions Are Taken

During the fall term, about one-quarter of school districts were completely online, about half were using a hybrid model, and fewer than one-quarter were fully open for in-person teaching. Yet more than half of school districts had students participating in sports programs. In an opinion column in USA Today earlier this week, Randi Weingarten, the […]

Read More

Schools Were Set to Reopen. Then the Teachers’ Union Stepped In.

Montclair is no ordinary town. The mayor, Sean Spiller, is the No. 2 official at the statewide teachers’ union, the New Jersey Education Association. The president of the local teachers’ labor group, Petal Robertson, is competing for a leadership job at the association. And one of the governor’s top political strategists, Brendan Gill — an […]

Read More

After the Capitol Was Stormed, Teachers Try Explaining History in Real Time

To explain the tumultuous events of recent days, Tracy Merlin used an analogy her second-grade class would understand: the eternal struggle between dog people and cat people. “Let’s say that half of the country thinks dogs are the best, and half of the country thinks cats are the best,” said Ms. Merlin, who teaches in […]

Read More

Biden Is Vowing to Reopen Schools Quickly. It Won’t Be Easy.

In his first 48 hours in office, President Biden sought to project an optimistic message about returning the nation’s many homebound students to classrooms. “We can teach our children in safe schools,” he vowed in his inaugural address. The following day, Mr. Biden signed an executive order promising to throw the strength of the federal […]

Read More

How the 3 Diallo Sisters Were Finally Able to Connect to Their Classes

“We immediately realized that we needed to get Wi-Fi in our buildings,” said Scott Auwarter, Bronxworks’ assistant executive director. Bronxworks contacted a cable company but determined it would take too long and charge too much. So Bronxworks had its security-camera contractor piggyback Wi-Fi for residents onto the existing network. By mid-May, the vendor had installed […]

Read More

Surge of Student Suicides Pushes Las Vegas Schools to Reopen

This fall, when most school districts decided not to reopen, more parents began to speak out. The parents of a 14-year-old boy in Maryland who killed himself in October described how their son “gave up” after his district decided not to return in the fall. In December, an 11-year-old boy in Sacramento shot himself during […]

Read More

Financial Aid: Grades, Merit and Talking to Kids About Paying for College

This Is Very Uncomfortable If you are raising your eyebrows now, administrators feel for you. They do not like the equity implications of merit aid either, even if affluent families who get $20,000 discounts may well be helping to cross-subsidize lower-income ones at many schools. Yet these managers of enrollment also wonder why you’re so […]

Read More

‘The Word of the Year Is Fluid’: The Pandemic Brings a New Teaching Style

EDISON, N.J. — This is Stephanie Rasimowicz’s daily dilemma: Scattered before her in second-period geometry class at Edison High School are a handful of freshmen, seated at desks many feet apart. Arrayed behind her are nearly 20 small, disembodied faces on a computer screen — her remote students, learning from home. Can the remote students […]

Read More

The Board Voted to Keep Schools Closed. Parents Revolted.

The anger over the decision to teach fall classes remotely was spelled in chalk on Beth Martin’s sidewalk. “OPEN THE SCHOOLS BETH,” an irate parent scrawled in July after ringing the front doorbell and confronting Ms. Martin, a retired librarian of 30 years and member of the local school board. “She didn’t swear at me, […]

Read More

A School District Vowed to Stay Open, Until Its Staffing Ran Out

Officials said that in several cases, the virus spread after unsanctioned student social gatherings outside of school, including parent-organized parties for band members and sports teams. The district had no plans to change anything for the spring semester, Barbara Jacoby, a spokeswoman for the schools, said in an email in December. “As long as we […]

Read More

With Students Missing Online Classes, Teachers Are Going to Students

WASHINGTON — It was 10:30 a.m., time for math class, and Tylee Wise was in his usual spot — a twin-size bed in the room he shares with his little sister, a television droning a few feet away — when a knock came at the apartment door. A teacher had come calling, hoping to find […]

Read More

Providence Kept Classrooms Open, and the Students Came Back

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Rachel Santos is clear about one thing: Distance learning did not work for her. “There was always Zoom meetings, and I couldn’t really focus on that, because I get easily distracted and there’s a lot of stuff going around in my house,” she said. Without any in-person support, she added, she had […]

Read More

What One District Did to Prevent Students From Failing

LUBBOCK, Texas — Madison Hermosillo started her sophomore year at Roosevelt High School alone in her room, bewildered and quickly falling behind. Set among cotton fields and oil derricks outside Lubbock, Texas, her school was open for in-person classes. But coronavirus cases were rampant, and her mother decided to keep her home. Madison, who is […]

Read More

Amid One Pandemic, Students Train for the Next

The project was awarded funding in early 2020, said Christine Marizzi, the chief scientist at BioBus. Weeks later, the coronavirus began to pummel the nation, and the team was forced to shift their plans. But Dr. Marizzi, who has long specialized in community-based research, was undeterred. For the remainder of the school year, the team […]

Read More

13,000 School Districts, 13,000 Approaches to Teaching During Covid

Jan. 21, 2021 What does it mean to go to public school in the United States during the pandemic? The answer looks so different in different parts of the country, it is hard to tell that we are one nation. In some rural and suburban areas, especially in the South, Midwest and Great Plains, almost […]

Read More

In Los Angeles, Teachers and Students Struggle With ‘No Human Contact’

LOS ANGELES — In Elissa Elder-Aga’s 25 years of teaching elementary school, reading aloud has always been her favorite classroom activity, a chance to captivate her audience and impart all sorts of lessons — from grammar to morals. But after many tries in the fall, she reached a sobering conclusion: No matter how hard she […]

Read More

Pandemic Teacher Shortages Imperil In-Person Schooling

Indeed, recent data from the Household Pulse Survey, an experimental effort from the U.S. Census Bureau to measure Americans’ experiences during the pandemic, suggests that the decreased availability of teachers — both in-person and online — may disproportionately affect low-income students. In the two weeks before the December holiday break, for instance, 6.3 million survey […]

Read More

What Does a More Contagious Virus Mean for Schools?

“When we look at what’s happened in the U.K. and think about this new variant, and we see all the case numbers going up, we have to remember it in the context of schools being open with virtually no modification at all,” Dr. Jenkins said. “I would like to see a real-life example of that […]

Read More

Chicago Students Return to School on Monday. Will Their Teachers?

As 6,000 prekindergarten and special education students prepare to return to Chicago school buildings on Monday for the first time since March, a question looms: How many of their teachers will be there to greet them? The city’s mayor, Lori Lightfoot, has argued that giving parents the option of sending their children to school in […]

Read More

New Year, New Drama in New York Schools

New tensions in New York Will New York City keep schools open for young children and those with the most complex disabilities, even as its virus numbers climb? The answer remains unclear as the political battle lines were redrawn yet again this week. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that the state would drop its […]

Read More

Fight Over Closing Schools Reignites as N.Y.C. Positive Rate Tops 9%

“There’s never going to be another first day like this one.” Announcer: “The largest school district in the United States reopened its doors today.” “Thermometers — this needs to go to every single family today. Grab a box of masks — temperature checks.” Announcer: “First experiment in in-person learning since March.” “That’s not 6 feet, […]

Read More

Teachers on TV? Schools Try Creative Strategy to Narrow Digital Divide

The concept quickly spread to Fox stations in Chicago, San Francisco and Washington, all of which joined with local school districts or teacher unions to put teachers on television. (The initiative ended in Houston and Washington after the spring but is still airing every weekday in San Francisco and on Saturdays in Chicago.) In Houston, […]

Read More

Clearing the Wreckage at the Education Department

The departing education secretary, Betsy DeVos, will be remembered as perhaps the most disastrous leader in the Education Department’s history. Her lack of vision has been apparent in a variety of contexts, but never more so than this fall when she told districts that were seeking guidance on how to operate during the coronavirus pandemic […]

Read More

Do Kids Really Need to Learn to Code?

Unemployment has remained a great concern in India over time, and parents forced their children, irrespective of their aptitudes, to become doctors or engineers or to get management degrees because of the fear that if their children did not join any of those professions, they were certain to be failures. Mr. Bajaj, who studied engineering […]

Read More

U.K. Virus Surge Surpasses Spring Peak as Lockdown Choices Loom

LONDON — About half of England is under the nation’s strictest lockdown measures, and people have been ordered to stay at home, but the coronavirus is still spreading at an alarming rate. Hospitals are treating more patients than at any time during the pandemic, the number of new infections has set a daily record, and […]

Read More

With Remote Learning, a 12-Year-Old Knows Her English Is Slipping Away

When Taniya Ria moved to the Bronx from Bangladesh in 2019, she didn’t know a word of English. Within months, Taniya, now 12, was translating for her mother, making American friends in class and getting good grades. Then the pandemic arrived. This fall, she took classes on an iPhone from her family’s one-bedroom apartment in […]

Read More

A Look at What’s in the Stimulus Package Trump Signed

WASHINGTON — The $900 billion stimulus bill that President Trump finally signed into law on Sunday evening goes well beyond providing the $600 checks that became a huge sticking point in getting the legislation across the finish line. The relief package casts a wide net with a variety of measures aimed at addressing the needs […]

Read More

A Cheerleader’s Vulgar Message Prompts a First Amendment Showdown

The key precedent is from a different era. In 1969, in Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, the Supreme Court allowed students to wear black armbands to protest the Vietnam War but said disruptive speech, at least on school grounds, could be punished. Making distinctions between what students say on campus and off […]

Read More

What Biden and Harris Owe the Poor

Before he was elected in November, Joe Biden promised that his “theory of change” for reforming the economy would be “ending poverty.” He pledged to champion a $15 minimum wage, affordable health care for all and federal action to address systemic racism. In the midst of an economic crisis, a pandemic and an uprising for […]

Read More

Disadvantaged Students More Likely to Be Learning Remotely, Study Finds

NWEA, a nonprofit research group, warned in May that the spring school closures could cost students a third of their expected annual progress in reading and half of their expected progress in math. A subsequent analysis of fall test scores showed better results — no falloff in reading and more modest declines in math — […]

Read More