Tag: Discrimination

2 Men Detained in Jussie Smollett Case Are Released by Police

The two brothers arrested in connection with the reported attack on the “Empire” star Jussie Smollett were released without being charged on Friday, a police spokesman said. They are no longer considered potential suspects. “Due to new evidence as a result of today’s interrogations, the individuals questioned by police in the ‘Empire’ case have now […]

Read More

‘He’s Not There Yet’: Embattled Governor Seeks Forgiveness From Black Virginians

RICHMOND, Va. — He prayed with black leaders, invoked his deep respect for the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and insisted that the blackface he once wore was not indicative of the type of person he is today. He discussed increasing funding for at-risk youth programs and affordable housing, and scheduled the first of […]

Read More

XPO Logistics Will Close Warehouse Where Some Pregnant Workers Miscarried

XPO Logistics will close a Memphis warehouse where employees had complained about widespread discrimination and a number of pregnant workers had miscarriages. The company said it would close the site because Verizon, whose cellphones and other products XPO ships from the warehouse, had decided to stop using the facility. The moves followed a New York […]

Read More

After Jussie Smollett TV Appearance, Police Say They Found Men in Video

Jussie Smollett, a star of the Fox television show “Empire” who said late last month that he had been assaulted by two men yelling homophobic and racial slurs in downtown Chicago, told “Good Morning America” that he was “pissed off” by the attack and those who doubted his story. The comments came Thursday in his […]

Read More

Feature: The Secret History of Women in Coding

As a teenager in Maryland in the 1950s, Mary Allen Wilkes had no plans to become a software pioneer — she dreamed of being a litigator. One day in junior high in 1950, though, her geography teacher surprised her with a comment: “Mary Allen, when you grow up, you should be a computer programmer!” Wilkes […]

Read More

The Lonely Life of a Black Talent Agent in Hollywood

Movies like “Black Panther” and “Crazy Rich Asians” don’t come around all that often partly because of how projects are put together. Chances are the people brokering those deals — and determining who gets in the door and what stories are told — are white. Pushes for greater diversity onscreen have been mirrored in some […]

Read More

Women Sue Yale Over a Fraternity Culture They Say Enables Harassment

Three Yale students who claim they were groped at fraternity parties have filed a class-action lawsuit against the university, arguing the school has fostered an environment where alcohol-fueled gatherings at off-campus fraternity houses dictate the undergraduate social scene. While the New Haven, Conn., university presents itself as a campus where fraternities are not a major […]

Read More

Sharp Rise in Anti-Semitic Acts in France Stokes Old Fears

PARIS — Swastikas drawn on portraits of a women’s rights champion and Holocaust survivor in Paris; the word “Juden” (Jews, in German) spray-painted on a bagel bakery; a tree planted in memory of a young Jewish man who was tortured to death, chopped down in a Paris suburb. A spate of reports in recent days […]

Read More

Ilhan Omar’s Very Bad Tweets

Last October, after a crude mail bomb was found in George Soros’s mailbox, Representative Kevin McCarthy, the California Republican who is now the House minority leader, tweeted, “We cannot allow Soros, Steyer and Bloomberg to buy this election!” The tweet, since deleted, was referring to Tom Steyer and Michael Bloomberg, both of them, like Soros, […]

Read More

‘Homosexual Community’ Controls City Council, One Member Says. He’s Resisting Calls to Resign.

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] As a New York State senator, Rubén Díaz Sr. once sued to stop a high school for gay and transgender students from opening. Several years later, in 2011, Mr. Díaz held a rally to oppose same-sex marriage while his […]

Read More

If Justin Fairfax Is Forced Out in Virginia, Who’s Next in Line?

Coalescing scandals have engulfed Virginia’s leaders, plunging the state into political free fall. First, Gov. Ralph Northam came under fire for a racist yearbook photo, which he acknowledged and then denied appearing in. He also admitted to wearing blackface to dress up as Michael Jackson in the 1980s. Then Lt. Gov. Justin E. Fairfax was […]

Read More

Virginia Is in Turmoil. Here’s a Breakdown of Seven Days of Scandal.

For Virginia’s top state officials, it was a week of chaos. There was an apology, a reversal and an admission about blackface. A sexual assault allegation was made, and an emphatic denial was made in response. Then came another admission about blackface. Last week, the clouds began to gather over Gov. Ralph S. Northam, 59, […]

Read More

When Is Sorry Not Enough? Virginia Scandals Test the Limits of Forgiveness

They are very, very sorry, they tell their constituents, lips pursed, eyes downcast, forehead flop sweat glistening in front of the television cameras as they try to explain their transgressions. Implicit in their words of remorse is a question: Will you forgive me? That wearying American political ritual repeated itself once again during a circuslike […]

Read More

Beyond College Campuses and Public Scandals, a Racist Tradition Lingers

ATLANTA — Nina Yeboah was a freshman at Georgia State University in 2004 when she heard about the pair of white fraternity brothers who had shown up at a “Straight Outta Compton” party in blackface. Fifteen years later, she said, it still feels traumatic to talk about what would become a moment of embarrassment and […]

Read More

Virginia’s Governor Is Hanging On. He Might Last Another Three Years.

RICHMOND, Va. — Gov. Ralph Northam of Virginia apologized. He held the ritual news conference of a humiliated politician, punctuated with a discussion of whether he could still do the moonwalk. He went into seclusion. And so, here he is: diminished, abandoned, condemned — and still the governor of Virginia. Mr. Northam, besieged after the […]

Read More

Past Tense: Why Won’t Blackface Go Away? It’s Part of America’s Troubled Cultural Legacy

He keeps showing up, like some slightly bemused and maniacal houseguest, usually intending to get a laugh but instead taking America back into a wicked time warp. The man in blackface stands there, frozen. The photo of him starts to ricochet around our race-haunted land. The outcry begins anew. We find ourselves in this situation […]

Read More

Virginia Republican Was Top Editor of Yearbook That Included Blackface Photos and Racist Slurs

Thomas K. Norment Jr., the powerful Republican majority leader in the Virginia Senate, was a top editor of a 1968 college yearbook that included several photographs of students in blackface as well as racist slurs. Mr. Norment, 72, a longtime fixture and political broker in the State Legislature, is the first Republican to be swept […]

Read More

Gucci and Adidas Apologize and Drop Products Called Racist

Less than a week into Black History Month, in two episodes of retail déjà vu, Adidas and Gucci have apologized and pulled products criticized as racist. The offending Gucci item was an $890 black-knit women’s balaclava that could be pulled up over the lower half of the wearer’s face. The sweater included bright red lips […]

Read More

Nonfiction: The Black Sergeant and the White Judge Who Changed Civil Rights History

UNEXAMPLED COURAGE The Blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodard and the Awakening of President Harry S. Truman and Judge J. Waties Waring By Richard Gergel In “Reconstruction,” an essay published in 1866, Frederick Douglass argued that even as radical Republicans (former abolitionists and their supporters) gained control over America’s constitutional revolution, this might not matter “while […]

Read More