Tag: Discrimination

Tony Hall to Step Down as BBC Chief

LONDON — After leading the British Broadcasting Corporation for seven years, Tony Hall said on Monday that he would resign this summer, an unexpected announcement that made no mention of the gender pay-gap scandal that has dogged the institution in recent years. “If I followed my heart I would genuinely never want to leave,” Mr. […]

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The Neighborhoods We Will Not Share

In the mid-20th century, federal, state and local governments pursued explicit racial policies to create, enforce and sustain residential segregation. The policies were so powerful that, as a result, even today blacks and whites rarely live in the same communities and have little interracial contact or friendships outside the workplace. This was not a peculiar […]

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Banning Facial Recognition Isn’t Enough

Communities across the United States are starting to ban facial recognition technologies. In May of last year, San Francisco banned facial recognition; the neighboring city of Oakland soon followed, as did Somerville and Brookline in Massachusetts (a statewide ban may follow). In December, San Diego suspended a facial recognition program in advance of a new […]

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The Big Ask of Black Voters: Trust the Government

DANVILLE, Va. — Ten minutes into a small community meeting between black farmers from Southern Virginia and regional campaign staff for Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, an aide took the floor. He was the only white person to speak in a room of older black voters seated in an old beauty salon. He stood, delivering […]

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The Injustice of This Moment Is Not an ‘Aberration’

Ten years have passed since my book, “The New Jim Crow,” was published. I wrote it to challenge our nation to reckon with the recurring cycles of racial reform, retrenchment and rebirth of caste-like systems that have defined our racial history since slavery. It has been an astonishing decade. Everything and nothing has changed. When […]

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Culture War in the Workplace

The proceedings began with three fast, muted raps on the door. Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family and friends, joined by many, many people who’d never even met her, filled every row in the small, mostly beige hearing room on the third floor of the federal courthouse, somewhere between downtown Brooklyn and the waterfront. Five months before, on […]

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