Tag: Discrimination

Applying to College, and Trying to Appear ‘Less Asian’

Some of the students said they had written about their Asian identity in their admissions applications, but they described carefully calibrated essays — intended to relay an applicant’s life while also avoiding stereotypes. Ms. Li, the chess player, said she had felt that she had more space to discuss her identity from a generational perspective. […]

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California Panel Sizes Up Reparations for Black Citizens

The state and local efforts have faced opposition over the potentially steep cost to taxpayers and, in one case, derided as an ill-conceived campaign to impose an “era of social justice.” More on California Jaywalking Law: California has had one of the strictest jaywalking laws in the nation. Starting Jan. 1, that will no longer be […]

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Widespread Racial Disparities in Discipline Found at NY Prisons

It said the department would “continue to emphasize our vision of a fair and just criminal justice system.” Corrections has already implemented a number of changes intended to reduce racial bias, the report noted, including increasing the use of statewide hearing officers less likely to be influenced by prison leadership, diversifying its work force and […]

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The Table for Trump’s Antisemitic Banquet Was Set Long Ago

The former president, who is running for his former office, invites to his home one of the most notorious antisemites in the United States, who brings along a well-known Holocaust denier. So far, to my knowledge, the only member of Donald Trump’s cabinet to publicly condemn his former boss by name is Mike Pence. Nor, […]

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Buying a Home Is Harder if You’re Black

And Black female prospective home buyers are applying for home loans — and being approved — at higher rates than previous years. In 2021, the number of applications from Black women, which has been climbing since 2010, jumped 14 percent. Applications from Black male prospective home buyers, in contrast, have been declining since 2017. The […]

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Antisemitism’s March Into the Mainstream

Tom Stoppard’s wrenching drama “Leopoldstadt,” which I recently saw on Broadway, begins in 1899 at a Christmas party in the Vienna apartment of Hermann Merz, a prosperous and assimilated Jewish businessman, who is married to a Catholic and nominally converted. Hermann is convinced that the antisemitism that plagued his forefathers is fading into the past. […]

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Mpox: WHO renames Monkeypox Citing Racial Stigma

The World Health Organization, responding to complaints that the word monkeypox conjures up racist tropes and stigmatizes patients, is recommending that the name of the disease be changed to mpox. Both names are to be used for a year until monkeypox is phased out. The recommendation, issued on Monday, follows outbreaks that began about six […]

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​How Britain Turned ‘Modern Slavery’ Law Against Low-Level Drug Dealers

Over pepper steaks at a Caribbean restaurant, the man complimented Mr. Wabelua for keeping things “trill”— refusing to give the police any information. But, he said, Mr. Wabelua owed him about $4,000 for the drugs and cash seized during his arrest. The man had an offer. Mr. Wabelua could clear his debt in four to […]

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I Want the World to See Us Kissing

I was raised in New York City, so I didn’t fully appreciate the privilege I had of growing up seeing queer love on display in public. But when I was in high school, I moved to Atlanta. I’ll never forget seeing two Black boys kissing, then being ridiculed and verbally assaulted with slurs. Ever since, […]

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Here’s What to Know With the NYPD Joining the Ring Neighbors App

The New York Police Department, which already relies on a high-tech toolbox that includes facial recognition software, drones and mobile X-ray vans, has joined Neighbors, a public neighborhood watch platform owned by Amazon’s Ring where video doorbell owners can post clips, and where precincts can enlist the help of the city’s residents in their investigations. […]

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Qataris Say Criticism of Country Amid World Cup Is Rooted in Stereotypes

When the singer Rod Stewart was offered more than $1 million to perform in Qatar, he said, he turned it down. “It’s not right to go,” Mr. Stewart told the The Sunday Times of London recently, joining a string of public figures to declare boycotts or express condemnation of Qatar as the Gulf nation hosts […]

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A Japanese American Family, a Native American Tribe and a Bountiful Friendship

In the face of discrimination and hate, the Inabas and the Yakama Nation forged a bond through a farm in eastern Washington that has lasted for more than 100 years. WHY WE’RE HERE We’re exploring how America defines itself one place at a time. In eastern Washington, a farm tells the story of two communities […]

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What to Know About Kyrie Irving’s Antisemitic Movie Post and the Fallout

Nets guard Kyrie Irving is facing backlash for posting a link on Twitter to an antisemitic film last month. For a week, he declined to apologize or say that he held no antisemitic beliefs, prompting the Nets on Nov. 3 to suspend him indefinitely. He has since apologized, but the fallout continues: On Nov. 4, […]

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Amazon Considers Disclaimer to Antisemitic Film Irving Shared Online

The Brooklyn Nets and the Anti-Defamation League sent a letter to Amazon asking the company to address the “deeply and unequivocally antisemitic” documentary and related book at the heart of the Brooklyn Nets guard Kyrie Irving’s suspension. The company said it was working with the A.D.L. to explore adding a disclaimer to the film. The […]

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Oz Could Be the First Muslim U.S. Senator, but Some Muslim Americans Are Ambivalent

In just a few days, Pennsylvania could elect Dr. Mehmet Oz to the Senate, which would make him the nation’s first Muslim senator. With an eye on that history, Muslims in the state have invited him to events at mosques. They have waited for him to talk about how his life has been influenced by […]

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Nets Say Kyrie Irving’s Apology Isn’t Enough to End Suspension

The backlash against the 30-year-old Irving began last week, when he posted a link on Twitter to the 2018 film “Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America,” which promotes several antisemitic tropes. On Saturday, after a loss to the Indiana Pacers, Irving reiterated his support for the film and for an antigovernment conspiracy theory promoted […]

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For Ghana’s Only Openly Transgender Musician, ‘Every Day Is Dangerous’

ACCRA, Ghana — When Maxine Angel Opoku was still an upstart musician, relatively unknown and struggling to stand out in Ghana’s competitive music scene, she sang about love, romance and being sexy. Then, in August 2021, lawmakers in the country’s Parliament introduced a bill that would imprison people who identify as transgender, as Ms. Opoku […]

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‘I’m Afraid for My Future’: Proposed Laws Threaten Gay Life in Russia

MOSCOW — In an industrial block in northeastern Moscow on a recent Friday night, organizers of an L.G.B.T.Q.-friendly art festival were assiduously checking IDs. No one under 18 allowed. They were trying to comply with a 2013 Russian law that bans exposing minors to anything that could be considered “gay propaganda.” The organizers had good […]

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Nets Suspend Kyrie Irving Indefinitely After Antisemitic Movie Post

The Nets suspended guard Kyrie Irving indefinitely Thursday for his “failure to disavow antisemitism” since he posted a link to an antisemitic movie on Twitter last week, though he had said there were some things in the movie he did not agree with. “I didn’t mean to cause any harm,” Irving said after a Nets […]

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Extremism Is on the Rise … Again

Of course, Wilson was no Trump. Trump is one of the worst presidents — if not the worst — that this country has ever had. Wilson at least, as the University of Virginia’s Miller Center points out, supported “limits on corporate campaign contributions, tariff reductions, new and stronger antitrust laws, banking and currency reform, a […]

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A Diverse Supreme Court Questions the Value of Diversity

He imagined a Black applicant. “Let’s say his viewpoints tend to be very close to, you know, the white applicants,” the chief justice said, “and he grew up in Grosse Pointe, you know, had a great upbringing, comfortable, his parents went to Harvard, he’s a legacy, and yet, under your system, when he checks African […]

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Nets Fire Coach Steve Nash

The Nets fired Coach Steve Nash on Tuesday as the team struggled on the court and was under fire for the off-court actions of their star guard Kyrie Irving. “Personally, this was an immensely difficult decision,” Nets General Manger Sean Marks said in a statement. “However, after much deliberation and evaluation of how the season […]

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Did your company just add salary information to job posts?

Starting Tuesday, nearly all employers in New York City are required to include a salary range in their job posts, whether they advertise jobs on an online job board, in a job fair flier or on an internal bulletin board. At most companies, complying with the new law will require a change. Existing employees may […]

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Asian American Students Face Bias, but It’s Not What You Might Think

None of the white, Black or Hispanic adults we interviewed were treated similarly. Hispanic students in particular experience the opposite effect in school, as my work with Estela Diaz shows. The Hispanic students we studied received little encouragement from their teachers to attend college and even less information about how to get in. The sociologist […]

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In Clash Over Affirmative Action, Both Sides Invoke Brown v. Board of Education

WASHINGTON — When the Supreme Court hears arguments on Monday on the fate of affirmative action in higher education, the justices will be working in the looming shadow of a towering legal landmark: Brown v. Board of Education, the unanimous 1954 decision that said the Constitution prohibits racial segregation in public schools. Both sides claim […]

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Affirmative Action Has Become a Strange Monster

When the Supreme Court first ruled that universities could consider race in their admissions process, in 1978’s Regents of the University of California v. Bakke, the nine justices wrote six opinions between them. The court’s divisions were suggestive of an enduring uncertainty in the debate about affirmative action, which will return to the Supreme Court […]

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Antisemitic campaign tries to capitalize on Elon Musk’s Twitter takeover.

A coordinated campaign to spread antisemitic memes and images on Twitter resulted in more than 1,200 tweets and retweets featuring the offensive content, according to an analysis by the Anti-Defamation League. The tweets identified by the A.D.L. added to a flurry of racist, transphobic and rule-breaking content that coursed through Twitter on Friday after Elon […]

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On Affirmative Action, What Once Seemed Unthinkable Might Become Real

Moreover, a brief by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Inc., under the auspices of which Thurgood Marshall argued Brown before the Supreme Court, warns that the plaintiff’s position “would transform Brown from an indictment against racial apartheid into a tool that supports racial exclusion.” The “egregious error” in the court’s majority opinion in […]

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L.A.P.D. Opens Criminal Inquiry Into Recording That Captured Racist Remarks

The Los Angeles Police Department is investigating whether a secretly recorded conversation between three City Council members and a labor leader that included racist insults and slurs was made illegally, Chief Michel Moore said on Tuesday. The leaked audio, recorded last year and made public this month, prompted calls from across the nation for those […]

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For Disabled Workers, a Tight Labor Market Opens New Doors

“Remote work and remote-work options are something that our community has been advocating for for decades, and it’s a little frustrating that for decades corporate America was saying it’s too complicated, we’ll lose productivity, and now suddenly it’s like, sure, let’s do it,” said Charles-Edouard Catherine, director of corporate and government relations for the National […]

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