Tag: Colleges and Universities

With New Investigation at Duke and U.N.C., Feds Hunt Anti-Israel Bias in Higher Education

WASHINGTON — The Education Department has ordered Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to remake the Middle East Studies program run jointly by the two schools after concluding that it was offering students a biased curriculum that, among other complaints, did not present enough “positive” imagery of Judaism and Christianity […]

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Charges Against Another Parent Revealed in the College Admissions Scandal

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Prosecutors unsealed charges on Tuesday against a woman who they said had paid a consultant $400,000 to get her son admitted to the University of California, Los Angeles, as a recruit for the soccer team. The charges added another defendant to the Justice Department’s sprawling college admissions prosecution. The woman, Xiaoning Sui, 48, […]

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New Mexico Announces Plan for Free College for State Residents

ALBUQUERQUE — In one of the boldest state-led efforts to expand access to higher education, New Mexico is unveiling a plan on Wednesday to make tuition at its public colleges and universities free for all state residents, regardless of family income. The move comes as many American families grapple with the rising cost of higher […]

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A Professor’s Killing Sends a Chill Through a Campus in Pakistan

BAHAWALPUR, Pakistan — Prof. Khalid Hameed’s devotion to teaching often led him to arrive early for work, and the day he was killed was no different. Professor Hameed, a senior English lecturer at Government Sadiq Egerton College in the Pakistani city of Bahawalpur, parked at about 8 a.m. on March 20, signed the staff room […]

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What Chinese Students Abroad Really Think About Hong Kong

SYDNEY, Australia — As tensions have swelled on Australian university campuses over the democracy movement in Hong Kong, the battle lines seem to have been neatly drawn: Chinese students on the side of China, and Chinese-Australian students on the side of Hong Kong. But inside the halls, the reality is more complicated. Views are often […]

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A Harvard Professor Doubles Down: If You Take Epstein’s Money, Do It in Secret

It is hard to defend soliciting donations from the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. But Lawrence Lessig, a Harvard Law professor, has been trying. Mr. Lessig is a friend of Joichi Ito, who resigned as the director of the M.I.T. Media Lab, as well as from the boards of The New York Times Company and […]

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Orwellabama? Crimson Tide Track Locations to Keep Students at Games

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Sweat from an afternoon under a unrelenting sun and in stifling 100-degree heat had soaked through parts of Taylor Pell’s fraternity pledge uniform: khaki pants, blue blazer, white shirt and crimson tie. But he was embracing the grind. “Games like this is when it matters,” said Pell, a sophomore from Huntsville, Ala., […]

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The Meritocrat Who Wants to Unwind the Meritocracy

NEW HAVEN — In 2015, the graduating class at Yale Law School, as custom has it, elected one of its professors to give the commencement address. And when the day came, the speaker, Daniel Markovits, got onstage and told the students, more or less, that their lives were ruined. “For your entire lives, you have […]

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The Meritocracy Is Ripping America Apart

There are at least two kinds of meritocracy in America right now. Exclusive meritocracy exists at the super-elite universities and at the industries that draw the bulk of their employees from them — Wall Street, Big Law, medicine and tech. And then there is the more open meritocracy that exists almost everywhere else. In the […]

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Is College Merely Helping Those Who Need Help Least?

THE YEARS THAT MATTER MOST How College Makes or Breaks Us By Paul Tough I am — to capitulate fully to the nomenclature — a “first gen,” meaning a first-generation college graduate. For me, as for many first gens, a college degree was transformative. If you’d met me when I was 10 — pulling copper […]

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M.I.T. President Says He Thanked Jeffrey Epstein for Gift in Letter

M.I.T.’s president acknowledged Thursday that he had signed a letter thanking Jeffrey Epstein for a donation in 2012 and said senior members of his administration had approved the receipt of gifts from the disgraced financier as long as Mr. Epstein remained anonymous. The president, L. Rafael Reif, made the disclosure in an email to the […]

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The Seminary Flourished on Slave Labor. Now It’s Planning to Pay Reparations.

By the time Phillips Brooks arrived at the Virginia Theological Seminary in 1856, the institution was thriving. Founded more than three decades earlier in the Sunday school room of a church in Alexandria, Va., the seminary now sat on a 62-acre estate with lush meadows and glorious views of the Washington Monument. School officials saw […]

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American Universities Are Addicted to Billionaires

What gets me is the unctuous, oozing chumminess — the unembarrassed, hat-in-hand genuflection toward the pedophile rainmaker. There was Joichi Ito, director of Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s prestigious Media Lab, with a problem well known to anyone who’s ever labored in academia: He was low on funds. But unlike, say, the thousands of adjunct professors […]

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A Boy Was Bullied for His Homemade T-Shirt. Now the University of Tennessee Is Selling It.

In a state where the Gators, Noles and Canes vie for college football supremacy, an elementary school student in Florida recently showed up to class in a homemade T-shirt design bearing his allegiances to the University of Tennessee — and he was teased because of it. Now, the boy’s hand-drawn U.T. design can be worn […]

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You Can’t Go to College With Your Kid. But You Can Pretend on Facebook.

Jenny Tananbaum was at home in New Jersey one Saturday morning last September when she noticed a flurry of activity in the Facebook group she had joined for parents of students at American University in Washington, D.C., where her son was a freshman. Fire alarms were sounding in the dorms, according to posts from anxious […]

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Lynn Swann Resigns as U.S.C.’s Athletic Director

Lynn Swann, the athletic director at the University of Southern California since 2016, abruptly resigned on Monday amid turbulence in the football program, two F.B.I. investigations targeting the athletic department and questions about whether Swann’s connections to the school’s biggest donor had landed him the job, for which he had no previous experience. Swann’s resignation […]

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California Lawmakers Vote to Undo N.C.A.A. Amateurism

SACRAMENTO — There were two guests of honor at the monthly meeting of the Oakland Rotary club in November 2015: the University of California marching band and a sports economics expert railing about the N.C.A.A.’s rules barring college athletes from collecting compensation for their play. While the band riled up the crowd in the small […]

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End Legacy College Admissions

For nearly a century, many American college and university admissions officers have given preferential treatment to the children of alumni. The policies originated in the 1920s, coinciding with an influx of Jewish and Catholic applicants to the country’s top schools. They continue today, placing a thumb on the scale in favor of students who already […]

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A Virginia University Offers Free Semester to Students in Bahamas Displaced by Hurricane

More than 800 miles separate the University of the Bahamas and Hampton University in Virginia. But some students at the former, whose North campus was devastated by Hurricane Dorian, will be able to continue their education at no cost at the latter for a semester. The offer by Hampton came about because of a special […]

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