Tag: Columbia University

Black Columbia Student’s Confrontation With Security Becomes Flashpoint Over Racism on Campus

Alexander McNab, a black Columbia University senior, was walking through the gates of Barnard College on his way to the library at about 11:30 p.m. last Thursday. He heard a voice calling out “Hello, Sir,” repeatedly, after he had entered the gates. He figured it was a school public safety officer, wanting to see his […]

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A Late-Night Food Run at Barnard College Turns Into a Racial Hashtag for One Black Student

Barnard College in New York CityPhoto: Associated Press A college student’s quest for late-night leftovers turned into a racially charged episode where the student was roughed up and six Barnard College security guards ended up on administrative leave pending an investigation by the school into their actions. “We deeply regret that this incident occurred, and […]

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Charles Van Doren, a Quiz Show Whiz Who Wasn’t, Dies at 93

Charles Van Doren, a Columbia University English instructor and a member of a distinguished literary family who confessed to Congress and a disillusioned nation in 1959 that his performances on a television quiz show had been rigged, died on Tuesday in Canaan, Conn. He was 93. He died at Geer Village, a retirement community, near […]

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50 Years of Affirmative Action: What Went Right, and What It Got Wrong

On cold mornings, Les Goodson shows up early outside the University Club, on a wealthy stretch of Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, and races two panhandlers he has nicknamed Catman and Pimp-the-Baby for a warm spot in front of a steam vent. He launches into “Take Five” on his saxophone, leaving his case open for bills […]

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Tens of Thousands of Heart Patients May Not Need Open-Heart Surgery

ImageWith TAVR, the only incision is a small hole in the groin where a catheter is inserted. Traditional surgery involves cracking open the ribs and stopping the heart to insert the new valve.CreditJean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source The operation is a daring one: To replace a failing heart valve, cardiologists insert a mechanical replacement through a patient’s […]

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Essay: We Broke the Same Bone. My Recovery Was a Breeze, Hers an Ordeal. Why?

A recent essay in The New England Journal of Medicine was titled “Heart and Sole — Of Metatarsals, Meaning and Medicine.” I had to read it. It’s not often you come across a reflection on metatarsal fractures, though they are common. I had just recovered from breaking my fifth metatarsal, the slender bone on the […]

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The Gay, Black Civil Rights Hero Opposed to Affirmative Action

How would Bayard Rustin be judged today?CreditCreditAssociated Press Bayard Rustin was a chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington and thought reparations, and even separate African-American studies departments, were a bad idea. Many of his beliefs would be antithetical to today’s social justice advocates. In the video above, Coleman Hughes argues that by cherry-picking […]

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And the Band Played Until Someone Complained

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] The antics of the marching band at Columbia University were not like the banh mi at Oberlin, enraging students with its ciabatta and coleslaw and dark sins of cultural appropriation. Steeped in longstanding customs, the band’s best-known ritual, born […]

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The Trouble With Ethiopia’s Ethnic Federalism

Abiy Ahmed, the 42-year-old prime minister of Ethiopia, has dazzled Africa with a volley of political reforms since his appointment in April. Mr. Abiy ended the 20-year border war with Eritrea, released political prisoners, removed bans on dissident groups and allowed their members to return from exile, declared press freedom and granted diverse political groups […]

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How Bangladesh Made Abortion Safer

No one knows how many Rohingya became pregnant as a result of rape by the Myanmar military. No one knows how many babies were born to survivors of sexual violence living among the 750,000 Rohingya in camps in Bangladesh. The systematic sexual violence against the Rohingya reminded many in Bangladesh of their own painful history: […]

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I Was Kicked Off Stage by College Students. Did I Deserve It?

I’ve experienced a lot of strange things while performing comedy: Rosario Dawson made fun of me while I was bombing in front of hundreds of Bernie Sanders fans. I once had to tell the crowd mid-show that the venue was closing for an impromptu health inspection. On Nov. 30, I performed stand-up as part of […]

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The Best Art of 2018

ImageA series of Altarpieces in “Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future” at the Guggenheim use ascending and descending triangles set against energized orbs. Mysticism informed her pioneering abstraction.CreditGeorge Etheredge for The New York Times When the going gets rough, there’s always art. It can soothe and teach you, and arm you with new tools […]

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How to Handle Difficult Conversations at Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is America’s yearly celebration of family togetherness. But with partisan divisions at a boiling point after the polarizing midterm election and a punishing political year, many are bracing themselves for a war of words at the dinner table this Thursday. For the past two decades, Peter Coleman, the director of the Morton Deutsch International […]

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Grace Notes: The Worst Bad Poem? There’s a Contest for That

There was expectation in the room that someone would deliver a poem as lovely as a tree. Or not. The expectation was about choosing the worst of the worst — the worst bad poem of the year. The Alfred Joyce Kilmer Memorial Bad Poetry Contest has done that for more than 30 years. This time […]

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New York Is a Genuine Tech Hub (and That Was Before Amazon)

In 2003, Craig Nevill-Manning, a computer scientist at Google, wanted to set up an engineering outpost in New York. Google’s top leaders were skeptical, but they told him that he could go ahead if he could find 15 “Google-worthy” software developers in the city. “The attitude was that pretty much all the good software engineers […]

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When All Else Fails, There’s Culture

So has the Qalandiya International, or Qi, a biennial festival of contemporary arts, the result of seven cultural Palestinian institutions joining forces, which is unfolding this month in the West Bank, Gaza and Israel, and in cities worldwide, including New York. As the organizers note: “Qi aims to place Palestine on the world’s cultural map […]

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Harvard’s Endowment Grew 10% Last Year, but Some Rivals Did Better

Harvard University’s endowment, the world’s largest, grew 10 percent in the most recent fiscal year to $39.2 billion, officials said on Friday. That was slightly better than the previous year, when Harvard began to revamp the endowment under a new investment chief, but fell short of returns reported recently by several other large universities. The […]

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