Tag: Race and Ethnicity

When James Baldwin Squared Off Against William F. Buckley Jr.

THE FIRE IS UPON US James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate Over Race in AmericaBy Nicholas Buccola In 1965, the year of the Selma-to-Montgomery marches and the Watts riots, an ancillary skirmish played out across the Atlantic. James Baldwin, then at the height of his international reputation, faced off against William F. […]

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Review: ‘Watchmen’ Is an Audacious Rorschach Test

Many a superhero origin story involves exposure to a volatile substance — something dangerous, radioactive, caustic — that can be powerful if mastered, ruinous if uncontrolled. In HBO’s “Watchmen,” beginning Sunday, that fissile storytelling material is history: specifically, America’s legacy of white supremacy. The first episode begins with the 1921 riot in Tulsa, Okla., in […]

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How Unpredictable Work Hours Turn Families Upside Down

Unpredictable schedules can be brutal for hourly workers, upending their lives. New research shows that African-Americans, Hispanics and other minorities — particularly women — are much more likely to be assigned irregular schedules, and that the harmful repercussions are felt not just by the workers but also their families. The findings come from continuing surveys […]

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How Moving to France and Having Children Led a Black American to Rethink Race

SELF-PORTRAIT IN BLACK AND WHITEUnlearning RaceBy Thomas Chatterton Williams Thomas Chatterton Williams is the son of a black father and a white mother, but grew up identifying as black on the basis that even one drop of black blood defines a person as belonging to that often besieged minority. His father claimed that his mother […]

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How to Beat Trump at His Own Game

“Democrat Savages,” President Trump recently tweeted, are driving the impeachment against him. When he then named in particular two Jewish congressmen and four congresswomen of color — Jerry Nadler of New York, Adam Schiff of California and the quartet that includes Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York — the racist connotations of the “savage” slur buzzed. […]

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‘Racist’ Snub of Mother Cabrini? Cuomo Needles de Blasio

If Mayor Bill de Blasio and the actor Chazz Palminteri got into a dispute, which side do you think Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo would be on? A few hints. Mr. Cuomo and Mr. de Blasio, both Democrats, are New York’s most famous frenemies, and the governor seldom bypasses a juicy opportunity to tweak the mayor. […]

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Trumpism’s Infinite Vulgarities

The terrains of acceptability and respectability have shifted under the American conservative. That which was once forbidden is now embraced. That which they once condemned they cheer. Conservatism has been unveiled in all its craven glory. No longer is it shrouded behind morality, small government, traditional values and spending concerns. President Trump is the new […]

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Suburbanites in Louisiana Vote to Create a New City of Their Own

BATON ROUGE, La. — Residents of a largely white suburb of Baton Rouge voted on Saturday to incorporate a new city of their own — to be called St. George — and take away control of the community’s taxes, schools and other services from the less affluent, more diverse surrounding parish. The outcome was a […]

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How ‘White Guilt’ in the Age of Trump Shapes the Democratic Primary

ANKENY, Iowa — When Donald Trump was elected, John Olsen felt enraged by the racial tension that fueled his rise, the silence of his white neighbors and the stories of racial discrimination he heard from his nonwhite friends. Black friends said they were followed around department stores, so Mr. Olsen, who is white, became a […]

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What if the Supreme Court Had an L.G.B.T. Justice?

Near the end of this year’s hit Broadway show “What the Constitution Means to Me,” the audience hears a scratchy old recording of an oral argument at the Supreme Court. The year is 1965, and the justices are debating the topic of married women’s right to birth control. Or that’s the idea, anyway; for what feels […]

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What Makes Us All Radically Equal

Around New Year’s 2017, a community organizer named Chris Lambert leased a soon-to-be-empty school building for $1 in one of Detroit’s poorer African-American neighborhoods. The plan was to pour $5 million into remodeling the building, take on the $1-million-a-year operating expenses and turn the place into a vibrant hub for the surrounding community, with nonprofits, […]

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Montgomery, a Cradle of Civil Rights, Elects Its First Black Mayor

[Race affects our lives in countless ways. To read provocative stories on race from The Times, sign up here for our weekly Race/Related newsletter.] MONTGOMERY, Ala. — At a polling place not far from the intersection of avenues named for Jefferson Davis and Rosa Parks, Laura Minor spent a scorching afternoon on a folding chair […]

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Montgomery, Ala., Elects Steven Reed, Its First Black Mayor

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — On the cusp of celebrating 200 years as a city, Montgomery does not have too many “firsts” remaining. But on Tuesday night, the black-majority city and capital of Alabama elected Steven L. Reed as its first African-American mayor. Mr. Reed, a probate judge, captured about 67 percent of the vote in the […]

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Julián Castro Was Never as Outspoken as His Mother, Until Trump

SAN ANTONIO — When Rosie Castro’s sons, Julián and Joaquin, were still in elementary school, she took them to countless political meetings in San Antonio, hoping they would learn to see the world as she did: a place that needed Mexican-American voices, like theirs, fighting for representation in the upper echelons of power. A place […]

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The Power and Hurt of Growing Up Young, Black and Gay

HOW WE FIGHT FOR OUR LIVESBy Saeed Jones Roughly midway through the poet Saeed Jones’s devastating memoir, “How We Fight for Our Lives,” we meet “the Botanist,” who lives in an apartment decorated with tropical trees, lion statuettes and Christmas ornaments dangling from Tiffany lamps. Despite the camp décor, the Botanist advertises himself as “straight-acting” […]

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What It’s Like to See ‘Slave Play’ as a Black Person

One evening last month, the John Golden Theatre in Times Square — once the Broadway home for “Avenue Q” and, more recently, “A Doll’s House Part 2” — looked as though it had been transformed into Harlem’s Magic Johnson Theater. Or that’s the way at least one attendee described it, observing the near-full house made […]

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