Tag: Race and Ethnicity

In Citing Relationship With Segregationists, Joe Biden Makes Himself a Target

For an increasingly diverse and liberal Democratic Party, it seemed strikingly off-key when Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Tuesday night warmly recalled his working relationship in the 1970s with two virulent segregationists, Senators James O. Eastland of Mississippi and Herman E. Talmadge of Georgia. On Wednesday, Mr. Biden faced his sharpest criticism yet from his […]

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At Raucous Reparations Hearing, Ta-Nehisi Coates Takes Aim at Mitch McConnell

The House waded into the decades-old debate over reparations for African-Americans on Wednesday, convening its first hearing on legislation introduced 30 years ago that would create a commission to develop proposals to address the lingering effects of slavery and consider a “national apology” for the harm it has caused. Hundreds of spectators, mostly black, were […]

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Trump Is Changing the Shape of the Democratic Party, Too

Early on, after the votes were counted, the dominant political narrative about the 2016 election was straightforward. Donald Trump mobilized racially resentful whites to build an army of angry supporters determined to constrain minorities and halt the flood tide of immigrants from south of the border. “The triumph of Trump’s campaign of bigotry presented the […]

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Adidas Sells Diversity. Black Employees Say It Doesn’t Practice It.

In the United States, Adidas has built much of its name — and sales — through its association with black superstars. In the 1980s, the seminal hip-hop group Run-DMC gave the company’s sneakers and apparel cultural cachet through its song “My Adidas.” Popular black athletes and entertainers like James Harden, Candace Parker and Kanye West […]

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Buttigieg Facing Test of Leadership After Shooting in South Bend

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Mayor Pete Buttigieg remained in South Bend, Ind., on Tuesday to confront a local crisis involving the fatal shooting of a black resident by a white police officer, skipping scheduled campaign appearances in Hollywood. The shooting of the 54-year-old robbery suspect under conditions that remain murky has presented Mr. Buttigieg, a […]

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Black Bodies, Green Spaces

“Black people — we need a better publicist,” the comedian Wanda Sykes declares in her new Netflix special, “Not Normal.” Ms. Sykes has just told the story of a black security guard in Chicago who apprehended a gunman and then was himself shot by the police. Her solution for changing the perception of African-Americans as […]

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Americans Need More Neighbors

Housing is one area of American life where government really is the problem. The United States is suffering from an acute shortage of affordable places to live, particularly in the urban areas where economic opportunity increasingly is concentrated. And perhaps the most important reason is that local governments are preventing construction. Don’t be misled by […]

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Oberlin Helped Students Defame a Bakery, a Jury Says. The Punishment: $33 Million.

Protests over cultural sensitivity have long been a staple at Oberlin College, a liberal arts school tucked into the cornfields of Ohio, where students have spoken out about everything from microaggressions to the cultural appropriation of sushi. Now some of those protests have put the college on the hook for tens of millions of dollars. […]

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In Brazil, a New Rendering of a Literary Giant Makes Waves

RECIFE, Brazil — Throughout elementary and middle school, Ricardo Pavan Martins remembers reading Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, one of Brazil’s most famous writers. So the 29-year-old, who lives in Bauru, was shocked to see a new image of Machado that has gone viral in the country. It shows him with chocolate-brown skin, considerably darker […]

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The Raptors Win, and Canada Learns to Swagger

TORONTO — On Thursday night, when the Toronto Raptors won the N.B.A. championship in Oakland, Calif., the streets of Canada erupted in a patriotic euphoria that I’d never seen before. It was the first time that a Canadian team had made it to the N.B.A. finals, and Yonge Street, in the heart of Toronto, was […]

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When We Kill

“I hereby sentence you to death.” The words of Judge Clifford B. Shepard filled the courtroom in Jacksonville, Fla., on Oct. 27, 1976. Shepard was sentencing Clifford Williams Jr., whom a jury had just found guilty of entering a woman’s house with a spare key entrusted to him and then shooting her dead from the […]

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Augustine Tolton, Ex-Slave and First Black Priest in U.S., Takes Step to Sainthood

Augustine Tolton was born into slavery in Missouri in 1854, escaped to freedom as a child during the chaos of the Civil War, and later became the first African-American priest in the Roman Catholic Church. This week, he took the first step toward becoming the church’s first African-American saint. Pope Francis put Father Tolton on […]

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Overlooked No More: Ma Rainey, the ‘Mother of the Blues’

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. This month we’re adding the stories of important L.G.B.T.Q. figures. By Giovanni Russonello Ma Rainey did not make the first blues recording; that distinction belongs to Mamie Smith, the vaudevillian who recorded “Crazy Blues” in 1920. […]

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The Resurrection of Dolce & Gabbana

So much for moral posturing and cultural sensitivity. Dolce & Gabbana, the Italian brand that was, for a brief moment at the end of last year, a poster child for cultural ignorance and the comeuppance that can ensue; that was held up as an example of how a fashion brand can so profoundly mess up […]

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To Avoid Bias, Prosecutors Try Hiding a Suspect’s Race When Filing Charges

While riding the train in San Francisco three years ago, a white man told an African-American man that he smelled bad and should move away from him. An argument followed, and the African-American man, Michael Smith, was eventually tackled by police officers and accused of assaulting them. The San Francisco District Attorney’s Office charged Mr. […]

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Joe Overstreet, Painter and Activist, Is Dead at 85

Joe Overstreet, an artist and activist who in the 1960s took abstract painting into the sculptural dimension and later created a home in New York for artists who had been ignored by the mainstream, died on June 4 in Manhattan. He was 85. His Manhattan gallery, Eric Firestone, said the cause was heart failure. Mr. […]

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Jury Finds Oberlin College Libeled a Bakery and Awards $11 Million in Damages

In November 2016, a black Oberlin College student walked into a family-run shop near the Ohio school to buy wine with a fake ID, according to court records. A white employee, the grandson of an owner, suspected that the student was also trying to steal wine, and chased him outside, placing him in a chokehold, […]

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An Antiracist Reading List

No one becomes “not racist,” despite a tendency by Americans to identify themselves that way. We can only strive to be “antiracist” on a daily basis, to continually rededicate ourselves to the lifelong task of overcoming our country’s racist heritage. We learn early the racist notion that white people have more because they are more; […]

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Few Talked About Race at This School. Then a Student Posted a Racist Slur.

[For more coverage of race, sign up here to have our Race/Related newsletter delivered weekly to your inbox.] OWATONNA, Minn. — “I knew it wasn’t O.K.,” Kloey, 16, said. “I knew that for sure.” Late one Saturday night in February in Owatonna, Minn., Kloey posted a selfie on Snapchat with two of her friends. Kloey […]

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