Tag: Race and Ethnicity

White Kansas Official Resigns After Uproar Over ‘Master Race’ Remarks

A white county commissioner in Kansas resigned on Tuesday after an outcry over his use of the term “master race” in a discussion with a black consultant at a public meeting last week. The commissioner, Louis Klemp of Leavenworth County, made the comments to Triveece Penelton, who works for an architecture and design company, during […]

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Race and Mississippi History Form Backdrop to Senate Debate

JACKSON, Miss. — The last debate (we promise!) of the 2018 midterm campaign is taking place Tuesday night in Jackson, Miss., as Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith, a Republican, meets the Democrat Mike Espy in what will be the only joint forum between the two candidates before next Tuesday’s runoff election. The hourlong debate is set for […]

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Table for Three: Michelle Obama and Tracee Ellis Ross on the Power of Women’s Stories

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — “Girl, we were throwing down!” said Michelle Obama, playfully recounting a childhood scuffle with a neighborhood girl. And the enormous crowd at The Forum arena outside Los Angeles exploded. “A physical fight?” Tracee Ellis Ross asked incredulously. She was moderating the event that evening, the second stop on Mrs. Obama’s arena […]

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In Mississippi, Issues of Race Complicate a Senate Election

JACKSON, Miss. — A special election for the Senate in Mississippi has become a test of racial and partisan politics in the Deep South, as a Republican woman, Cindy Hyde-Smith, and an African-American Democrat, Mike Espy, compete for the last Senate seat still up for grabs in the 2018 midterm campaign. Ms. Hyde-Smith, who was […]

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White Kansas Official’s ‘Master Race’ Comment Draws Calls for His Resignation

The governor of Kansas is among several officials calling for a white county commissioner to resign after he used the term “master race” while addressing a black consultant at a public meeting this week. The commissioner, Louis Klemp of Leavenworth County, made the remark on Tuesday while criticizing the options for developing land that were […]

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A School Strike That Never Quite Ended

On Nov. 17, 1968, Albert Shanker, a tough Queens-bred union president, stood next to New York City’s patrician mayor, John Lindsay, to announce a settlement to a crippling teacher strike that had thrown a million students out of New York City public schools for weeks on end. The divisive strike laid bare long simmering tensions […]

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Lessons From a 103-Year-Old Jewish East London Socialist

LONDON — For more than eight decades Max Levitas was a feature of daily life in London’s East End, a busy multicultural district near the heart of the city. Until recently, he could still regularly be seen on the streets — he put his longevity down to the fact that he walked everywhere, plus his […]

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Steve McQueen and Viola Davis on Hollywood, Race and Power

CHICAGO — In Steve McQueen’s first meeting with Viola Davis, two years ago at her home in a verdant neighborhood of Los Angeles, he told her the story of his initial encounter with “Widows” — the 1983 British mini-series that has possessed him for 35 years and which will finally be exorcised on Nov. 16, […]

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Hate Crimes Increase for the Third Consecutive Year, F.B.I. Reports

Hate crime increased 17 percent last year from 2016, the F.B.I. said on Tuesday, rising for the third consecutive year as heated racial rhetoric and actions have come to dominate the news. Of the more than 7,100 hate crimes reported last year, nearly three out of five were motivated by race and ethnicity, according to […]

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Photo of More Than 60 Students Giving Apparent Nazi Salute Is Being Investigated

Police and school officials in a small town in Wisconsin are investigating a photograph taken last spring of about 60 male high school students, many of them making what appears to be a Nazi salute. The photograph, taken on the steps of a local courthouse before the Baraboo High School junior prom, was available for […]

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Mississippi Senator’s ‘Public Hanging’ Remark Draws Backlash Before Runoff

With her arm around a cattle rancher, Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith, Republican of Mississippi, drew laughter and applause at a recent campaign event when she gushed about how highly she thought of him: “If he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” But beyond the small crowd at the event, in […]

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Democrats Can’t Play It Safe. They Need Inspiring Candidates.

Andrew Gillum and Stacey Abrams, progressive African-American Democratic candidates, may not have won their races for governor in Florida and Georgia (both are still too close to call). But the strategy they followed is still the best strategy for Democrats to win: inspiring, mobilizing and turning out voters of color and progressive whites. I’ve argued […]

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A Defeat for White Identity

Running for president in 2016, Donald Trump sold two kinds of populism. One appealed to white tribalism and xenophobia — starkly in his early embrace of birtherism, recurrently in his exaggerations about immigrant crime, Muslim terrorism and urban voter fraud. The other was an economic appeal, aimed at working-class voters hit hard by de-industrialization who […]

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Devah Pager, Who Documented Race Bias in Job Market, Dies at 46

Devah Pager, a Harvard sociologist best known for rigorously measuring and documenting racial discrimination in the labor market and in the criminal justice system, died on Nov. 2 at her home in Cambridge, Mass. She was 46. Michael Shohl, her husband, said the cause was pancreatic cancer. In her seminal work, Dr. Pager, who was […]

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The Newest Jim Crow

In the midterms, Michigan became the first state in the Midwest to legalize marijuana, Florida restored the vote to over 1.4 million people with felony convictions, and Louisiana passed a constitutional amendment requiring unanimous jury verdicts in felony trials. These are the latest examples of the astonishing progress that has been made in the last […]

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Reimagining Norman Rockwell’s America

In 2012, Hank Willis Thomas saw a poster of Norman Rockwell’s painting of a family seated around a holiday table, the matriarch presenting a turkey to her guests. For Mr. Thomas, a 42-year-old black artist raised in Manhattan, the pale complexions in Mr. Rockwell’s 1943 masterpiece did little to represent his experience of a diverse […]

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Breaking Barriers, Letitia James Is Elected New York Attorney General

Letitia James was overwhelmingly elected as the attorney general of New York on Tuesday, shattering a trio of racial and gender barriers and placing herself in position to be at the forefront of the country’s legal bulwark against the policies of President Trump. With her victory over Republican nominee Keith H. Wofford, Ms. James, 60, […]

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