Tag: Documentary Films and Programs

At 35,853 Feet Down, an Argument About ‘Deepest’

How deep is the deep end of the ocean? The answer turns on an array of factors nearly as wide as the sea itself: the barometric pressure over the site in question, the seawater’s density and temperature, the vagaries of measurement and, perhaps, on whether a world record is at stake. The whereabouts of the […]

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Ken Burns’s ‘Country Music’ Traces the Genre’s Victories, and Reveals Its Blind Spots

Tell a lie long enough and it begins to smell like the truth. Tell it even longer and it becomes part of history. Throughout “Country Music,” the new omnibus genre documentary from Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan, there are moments of tension between the stories Nashville likes to tell about itself — some true, some […]

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Linda Ronstadt, Retired From Singing, Is Still a Glorious Voice

At the start of the new documentary “Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice,” the 10-time Grammy winner talks about why people sing. “For the same reasons birds do,” she says. “For a mate, to claim their territory or simply to give voice to being alive in the midst of a beautiful day. They sing […]

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‘Raise Hell’ Review: For Molly Ivins, Writing Was Fighting

Some crusading journalists write with a scalpel, others with a scythe. Molly Ivins, who famously called President George W. Bush “Shrub,” used both. She was funny and mean, clever and sincere; most of all she was political to the bone or at least that’s how she reads on the page and came across in talks. […]

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‘Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice’ Review: And What a Voice It Is

If you were listening to the radio in the mid-1970s — AM or FM; pop, country, R&B or AOR — at some point you were probably listening to Linda Ronstadt. Kids these days, with their curated playlists and SoundCloud streams, may not understand what it was like back then. A lot of music was never […]

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Matt Tyrnauer: Chronicler of Trump’s Mentor Roy Cohn

HOLLYWOOD — Back in 2016, when Matt Tyrnauer was cutting his documentary “Studio 54,” he was steeped in archival footage from the late 1970s of the Dante-esque disco. One boldfaced name popped off the screen. “So I’m thinking to myself, ‘This is a great character for a film, why has no one done a Roy […]

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The Last Single-Screen Theater in New York Goes Dark

The Paris Theater had its concession stand in the basement and a purple velvet curtain in front of the screen, and when it closed last week after 71 years, it was the last single-screen theater in New York City. The final film to show there was Ron Howard’s documentary “Pavarotti,” a fitting coda for the […]

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‘American Factory’ Review: The New Global Haves and Have-Nots

“The most important thing is not how much money we earn,” the Chinese billionaire Cao Dewang says in “American Factory” soon before we see him on a private jet. What’s important, he says, are Americans’ views toward China and its people. In 2016, Cao opened a division of Fuyao, his global auto-glass manufacturing company, in […]

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‘The Amazing Johnathan Documentary’ Review: The Joke’s on Who?

I’m too trusting to make documentaries. But I’d like to think I’d see a red flag if the subject of my hypothetical documentary was dying of heart disease yet started smoking meth for the camera. I’d talk to a doctor — maybe his. But just before the dying illusionist-comedian John Szeles inhales in “The Amazing […]

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Are Hippies the New Goths?

ImageThe pristinely garbed cult members of “Midsommar” engage in some very dark rituals.CreditCsaba Aknay/A24 All smiles in their ribbon-and-lace-trimmed mini-dresses, the three winsome young women could not have been more eye-catching. That they were members of the Manson clan, photographed, hair swinging, on their way to court, is chilling of course. But fashion, perversely, cannot […]

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The Best Movies and TV Shows New to Netflix, Amazon and More in August

Watching is The New York Times’s TV and film recommendation website. Sign up for our twice-weekly newsletter here. When August heat advisories are in effect, stay inside and cool off with a new show. Below are the most interesting of what we’ve found among the TV series and movies coming to the major streaming services […]

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D.A. Pennebaker, Pioneer of Cinéma Vérité in America, Dies at 94

D. A. Pennebaker, the groundbreaking documentary filmmaker best known for capturing pivotal moments in the history of rock music and politics, including Bob Dylan’s 1965 tour of England and Bill Clinton’s first presidential campaign, died on Thursday at his home in Sag Harbor, N.Y. He was 94. His death was confirmed by his son Frazer […]

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‘Honeyland’ Review: The Sting and the Sweetness

The opening minutes of “Honeyland” are as astonishing — as sublime and strange and full of human and natural beauty — as anything I’ve ever seen in a movie. A woman makes her way on foot across wild meadowlands and up a mountainside, carefully stepping along a narrow ledge to a rocky outcropping, where bees […]

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Where Is Michael Jackson’s Legacy 10 Years After His Death?

LOS ANGELES — There were fedoras and single white gloves and sequined military jackets. There was lots of moonwalking. Four people danced the choreography of “Smooth Criminal” in perfect sync. Five dozen Michael Jackson superfans from around the world had come to a gaming arcade on Hollywood Boulevard on Monday, the beginning of two days […]

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Stephen Curry Finally Gets Some Rest (but Only From Basketball)

Stephen Curry woke up sore on Thursday. He had good reason: It had been only a week since his Golden State Warriors lost a grueling N.B.A. finals series to the Toronto Raptors. In the last five seasons, Curry has played in 93 playoff games, adding more than the equivalent of a full 82-game regular season […]

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Review: ‘Edge of Democracy’ Looks at Brazil With Outrage and Heartbreak

During his eight years as president of Brazil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva — a former steelworker and union organizer known as Lula — was often referred to as one of the most popular politicians in the world. According to one poll, his approval rating among Brazilians when he left office in 2011 was 87 […]

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How Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka Spend Their Sundays

As actors and the parents of 8-year-old twins, Neil Patrick Harris and his husband, David Burtka, who is also a chef, know how to improvise. “There is no consistency to our routine except that we’re together and spending quality time with the kids,” Mr. Burtka, 44, said. Mr. Burtka’s first cookbook, “Life Is A Party,” […]

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In ‘Rolling Thunder Revue,’ Scorsese Tries to Capture a Wild Dylan Tour

Throughout “Rolling Thunder Revue,” the new film by Martin Scorsese chronicling Bob Dylan’s celebrated barnstorming tour in the fall of 1975, the participants struggle with how best to describe the event. It was like a “con man, carny, medicine show of old,” says Allen Ginsberg; “a circus atmosphere, dog and pony show,” says Sam Shepard; […]

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