Tag: Computers and the Internet

What Ads Are Political? Twitter Struggles With a Definition

SAN FRANCISCO — The Alzheimer’s Association, a health care advocacy group, recently spent more than $200,000 on an ad campaign on Twitter. The campaign had a singular purpose: To persuade people to ask Congress for larger investments in medical research for the disease. Now the nonprofit is worried about whether those messages will still fly. […]

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Can FaZe Clan Build a Billion-Dollar Business?

This article is part of our continuing Fast Forward series, which examines technological, economic, social and cultural shifts that happen as businesses evolve. LOS ANGELES — FaZe Clan could be called a media company, or an esports team, or an influencer marketing agency, or all of the above. “Something like who we are has never […]

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Amazon Protesting Pentagon’s $10 Billion JEDI Contract

Amazon on Thursday said it planned to officially challenge the Pentagon’s surprise decision last month to award a $10 billion cloud-computing contract to Microsoft, setting off another legal battle over the lucrative, decade-long project. Amazon said it had notified a federal court of its plans to protest the government’s decision. In a statement, a spokesman […]

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Whistle-Blower’s Name Keeps Evading Facebook and YouTube Defenses

SAN FRANCISCO — A week ago, YouTube and Facebook said they would block people from identifying the government official thought to be the whistle-blower who set in motion an impeachment inquiry into President Trump. It hasn’t worked out so well. A name believed by some to be the whistle-blower has been shared thousands of times […]

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Google Makes a Bid for Banking, Where Tech Firms Go to Stumble

Google already has a valuable stash of your digital data. Now it wants your cash, too. The search giant is teaming up with two banks, Citigroup and the Stanford Federal Credit Union, to begin offering a “smart checking” account next year. What fancy new features will “smart checking” include? Google isn’t sure. Neither are its […]

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Steve Jobs Was Right: Smartphones and Tablets Killed the P.C.

I got an iPad Pro recently, and I’ve fallen madly in love with it. This was unexpected. I’ve had iPads before, but like a lot of people, I hadn’t found them to be very useful. Tablets were good for surfing the Web and watching Netflix, but they’ve always been dogged by the charge that you […]

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How to Beat the Market

THE MAN WHO SOLVED THE MARKETBy Gregory Zuckerman There are few books in the investing world as well known as Burton Malkiel’s “A Random Walk Down Wall Street.” First published in 1973, it has never been out of print, and is now in its 12th edition. Its thesis is that “a blindfolded monkey throwing darts […]

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Dear Reader: Watch Where You’re Going

You’re walking around and a thought occurs: “I should check my phone.” The phone comes out of your pocket. You type a message. Then your eyes remain glued to the screen, even when you walk across the street. We all do this kind of distracted walking, or “twalking.” (Yes, this term is really a thing.) […]

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Superhero or Supervillain? Technology’s Role Changes Comic Books

This article is part of our continuing Fast Forward series, which examines technological, economic, social and cultural shifts that happen as businesses evolve. Comic books have been around since the 1930s, each story taking shape as it moves from its writer to its artists (usually a penciler and an inker) and then to its letterer […]

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How to Be a Whistle-Blower

This article is part of a limited-run newsletter. You can sign up here. Last week, at a conference in Portugal, I met John Napier Tye. He is a former State Department employee, a whistle-blower and a co-founder of Whistleblower Aid, a nonprofit law firm that represents individuals trying to expose wrongdoing. As you may have […]

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We Teach A.I. Systems Everything, Including Our Biases

SAN FRANCISCO — Last fall, Google unveiled a breakthrough artificial intelligence technology called BERT that changed the way scientists build systems that learn how people write and talk. But BERT, which is now being deployed in services like Google’s internet search engine, has a problem: It could be picking up on biases in the way […]

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The SoftBank Effect: How $100 Billion Left Workers in a Hole

For five years, Sunil Solankey, a retired captain in the Indian Army, had run the 20-room Four Sight Hotel in a New Delhi suburb. Business was steady, but he longed to make the establishment a destination for lucrative business travelers. Last year, a hospitality start-up called Oyo told Mr. Solankey that it would turn the […]

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How Laws Against Child Sexual Abuse Imagery Can Make It Harder to Detect

Child sexual abuse photos and videos are among the most toxic materials online. It is against the law to view the imagery, and anybody who comes across it must report it to the federal authorities. So how can tech companies, under pressure to remove the material, identify newly shared photos and videos without breaking the […]

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BART Apologizes for Handcuffing Man Eating Sandwich on a Train Platform

The general manager of the Bay Area Rapid Transit system apologized Monday to a man who was detained and handcuffed by a police officer last week after he was seen eating a sandwich on the train platform — an episode captured in a video that was widely shared and that prompted a weekend protest. BART’s […]

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Google to Store and Analyze Millions of Health Records

In a sign of Google’s major ambitions in the health care industry, the search giant is working with the country’s second-largest hospital system to store and analyze the data of millions of patients in an effort to improve medical services, the two organizations announced on Monday. The partnership between Google and the medical system, Ascension, […]

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With ‘Shadow Stalker,’ Lynn Hershman Leeson Tackles Internet Surveillance

This article is part of our continuing Fast Forward series, which examines technological, economic, social and cultural shifts that happen as businesses evolve. SAN FRANCISCO — “I found my voice through technology,” the artist and filmmaker Lynn Hershman Leeson is saying, sitting in an old-world bar here, wearing a long jacket with quotes from French […]

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On the Internet, No One Knows You’re Not Rich. Except This Account.

In February, an Instagram account called @BallerBusters cropped up and began wreaking havoc on the flashy Instagram entrepreneur community. Its goal: To expose phony entrepreneurs. Using a mix of screen-shotted receipts, memes and crowdsourced information from followers, the account seeks out people who don’t “act their wage.” Often, these are people who call themselves entrepreneurs […]

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Europe Is Toughest on Big Tech, Yet Big Tech Still Reigns

LONDON — Richard Stables should have felt vindicated when the European Union announced a $2.7 billion fine in 2017 against Google for breaking antitrust laws. He had raised alarms about the search giant’s power for years. But rather than feel victorious, Mr. Stables felt resigned. His company, Kelkoo, once a leading online shopping destination in […]

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SpaceX to Launch 60 More Starlink Satellites

Early on Monday morning, SpaceX is scheduled to launch 60 satellites into space at once — the second installment of Starlink, its planned constellation of tens of thousands of orbiting transmitters to beam internet service across the globe. The launch, from Cape Canaveral, Fla., is set for 9:56 a.m. Eastern and will be streamed live […]

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