Tag: Theater

The (Virtual) Theatrical Fringe Moves Front and Center

As the pandemic has sent most art forms scurrying into mole holes, some have had to adapt more than others. In the theater, the change has been especially pronounced, amounting to a complete upside-down flip: Big players can’t squeeze themselves into the new accommodations, but little ones feel right at home. So the experimental, the […]

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For Greece’s Theaters, the Coronavirus Is a Tragedy

EPIDAURUS, Greece — As dusk fell here on Saturday, a white-robed chorus filed onto the sparse stage of a limestone amphitheater for the National Theater of Greece’s production of “The Persians,” the world’s oldest surviving dramatic work. In 472 B.C., when Aeschylus’s play was first performed, the actors would have been wearing masks. This time, […]

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Provincetown: Go for the Mask Compliance, Stay for a Show

PROVINCETOWN, Mass. — Varla Jean Merman has a good arm, and when she threw her hairpiece into the swimming pool the other evening at the end of an increasingly frenzied number in her cabaret show, it landed on the surface just right. Then it floated there, inert and disheveled. “Everyone loves a wig in a […]

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London’s West End Comes Out of Lockdown. For an Afternoon.

LONDON — At just after 2 on Thursday afternoon, Andrew Lloyd Webber walked onstage at the ornate Palladium theater to introduce the first West End show since Britain went into lockdown in March. Before him sat some 640 theatergoers and workers, all somewhat distanced and all wearing masks. Suddenly, they stood up to applaud him […]

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8 Things to Do This Weekend

Art Asia Week’s Virtual ‘Redux’ Image“The Hundred Poems [By the Hundred Poets] as Told by the Nurse: Fujiwara no Yoshitaka” by Katsushika Hokusai. The 19th-century woodblock print is on view at Asia Week’s website.Credit…Scholten Japanese Art This year’s edition of Asia Week, the annual convergence of auctions, museum shows and private dealer exhibitions that provides […]

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Black Plays Are Knocking on Broadway’s Door. Will It Open?

The slate of shows scheduled to be staged on Broadway next spring — or whenever large-scale indoor theater is allowed to resume in New York — includes just three with Black writers. All of them are jukebox musicals. But what if theater owners and operators, mindful of this year’s roiling reconsideration of racial injustice, wanted […]

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Annie Ross, Jazz Vocalist of ‘Twisted’ Renown, Dies at 89

Annie Ross, who rose to fame as a jazz singer in the 1950s, struggled with personal problems in the ’60s, faded from the spotlight in the ’70s, re-emerged as a successful character actress in the ’80s and finished her career as a cabaret mainstay, died on Tuesday at her home in Manhattan. She was 89. […]

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A Director Brings Cerebral, Sexy Style to Opera Classics

SALZBURG, Austria — On a recent afternoon here, Krzysztof Warlikowski sat on a roof terrace, tousling his mane of hair and drawing deeply on a vape pen. Behind him were the spire of a church where Mozart prayed and the hills made famous by “The Sound of Music.” Just as the louche clouds of vapor […]

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Review: Reliving ‘Private Lives,’ This Time Mostly Women’s

An unlikely hodgepodge of names gets dropped in the course of Red Bull Theater’s Short New Play Festival: Virginia Woolf, Rachel Dolezal, Troilus, Cressida, Cervantes, Trump. But the name that gets dropped hardest — dropped in the sense that it all but disappears — is that of the production’s touchstone, Noël Coward. The eight 10-minute […]

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65 Million Tourists, Gone From N.Y.C.

ImageCredit…September Dawn Bottoms/The New York Times They walk a bit too slowly, crowd Times Square and gobble up street vendors’ hot dogs. No, not pigeons: tourists. Before the pandemic, in 2018, the city welcomed a record 65 million tourists from around the world. Those visitors spent $44 billion — money that was crucial to keeping […]

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‘I Have to Go in and Decolonize’: Europe’s Black Theater Makers Discuss the Scene

LONDON — This summer, a coalition of American theater artists issued a statement, “We See You, White American Theater,” calling for an overhaul of the country’s theater landscape. There should be term limits on theater industry leaders to improve representation, it said, and at least half of casts and creative teams should be people of […]

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After #OscarsSoWhite, Disability Waits for Its Moment

If history is a guide, one of the surest ways to get an Oscar is by being a nondisabled person playing a disabled character. About 25 actors have won Oscars for such performances, including Jamie Foxx for “Ray” (2005) and Angelina Jolie for “Girl, Interrupted” (1999), according to the Ruderman Family Foundation, which advocates for […]

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‘Richard II’ Review: A Radio King With a Tottering Crown

You say you want a revolution. Well, you know — we all wanna rule the world. Over four nights this week, the Public Theater and WNYC presented a sound-only revolution — an incompetent king dethroned, humiliated and murdered in an audio performance of “Richard II.” The polished production (presented as Shakespeare on the Radio, subbing […]

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Theater Streams See Stars Pop Up in Unexpected Places

One of theater’s great pleasures is watching actors bring characters to life. The era of online performing arts has added a remarkably democratic element by allowing high-caliber casts to pop up in everything from revisited classics to fresh-from-the-oven efforts by young playwrights. Most stars are available on short notice these days, after all, and now […]

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Missing Theater Under the Stars (Even the Bugs and the Rain)

In any year but this one, outdoor theater is part of the rhythm of summertime. We base our migrations on it, making pilgrimages to favorite seasonal spots. As ancient as Western drama itself, open-air theater is for the most part not happening right now — no queuing for hours to snag a coveted free ticket […]

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When a Corporate Picnic Plus Shakespeare Is Anything but Routine

For a long time after the Sept. 11 attacks, Cantor Fitzgerald curtailed corporate outings. When I arrived as a lawyer in 2002, things were still too raw, busy and fraught. But in 2003, our longtime outside lawyer invited our general counsel, my boss, to attend an event. He picked “Henry V” at Shakespeare in the […]

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A Plague on Your Houses: Reading Covid-19 Into Disease Onstage

“The hateful plague spreads like a raging wildfire, devouring the city without mercy, emptying homes and filling the streets with moans and wailing and heaps of rotting bodies,” declares a priest in “The Oedipus Project,” Theater of War Productions’ recent reading of scenes from “Oedipus the King,” translated and directed by Bryan Doerries. Since the […]

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‘Gotham Refuses to Get Scared’: In 1918, Theaters Stayed Open

War plays were big on Broadway in the fall of 1918. With the nation sending soldiers to Europe to fight in World War I, spectacles like the “Ziegfeld Follies” wrapped themselves in patriotism. The runaway hit of the season, though, was the kind of distraction that people relish in troubled times. They flocked to see […]

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This Is Theater in 2020. Will It Last? Should It?

The megahit live-capture of “Hamilton” on Disney+ notwithstanding, the American theater is not in good shape. The coronavirus shut down almost all productions; tourism ceased; actors, writers and backstage teams lost their jobs. Though we are still miles and months away from a resuscitation, who would have guessed that, in the meantime, the savior of […]

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