Tag: Theater

Rethinking Tiny Tim: Should a Disabled Actor Play the Role?

Sebastian Ortiz, 7, a first grader now making his Broadway debut in “A Christmas Carol,” scrunched up his face as he paused to think about what it means to be playing Tiny Tim onstage. “Always be brave,” he said. “Always look on the bright side,” suggested Jai Ram Srinivasan, 8, a third grader sharing the […]

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Get Ready for the Masterwork No One Has Seen

When the Cuban-American director and playwright María Irene Fornés died last fall, the New York Times obituary referred to her as “an underrecognized genius.” Now, what is perhaps her finest work, “Fefu and Her Friends,” can be seen at the Polonsky Shakespeare Center. Revolutionary in its form and daring in its philosophy, “Fefu,” from 1977, […]

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Review: Reflections That Sear in a Reborn ‘Fires in the Mirror’

Nearly three decades after it was first unveiled, the panoramic view provided by Anna Deavere Smith’s “Fires in the Mirror” still makes you catch your breath and shake your head in sorrow. In the Signature Theater’s crystalline revival of this documentary drama about the Crown Heights race riots of 1991, its reflective surfaces seem, if […]

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Review: The ‘Tina’ Musical Is One Inch Deep, Mountain High

“What is a musical?” I heard the perpetual question raised again a few days ago, and not innocently or idly. A showbiz veteran was concerned about the prospects for “Tina: The Tina Turner Musical,” which opened on Thursday at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater. How would it be different from a rock concert? she wondered. Would a […]

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Édouard Louis Would Like to Talk About Theater Now

Édouard Louis was relieved to be talking about something else. Journalists will often ask about politics, since Louis — a wunderkind of French literature who at 27 has already risen to the status of public intellectual — is seen as a firebrand of the left and a voice for the Yellow Vests movement. Or they’ll […]

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Harry Potter’s Sophomore Slump: ‘Cursed Child’ Loses Steam on Broadway

Harry Potter could use a little more magic. The boy wizard — actually, he’s all grown up now — triumphed in the worlds of books, movies and theme parks. But he’s having a tougher time on Broadway. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,” the two-part play set 19 years after the conclusion of the final […]

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Secret From ‘Slave Play’ Creator: Surprise Show in Brooklyn

Jeremy O. Harris, the provocative playwright behind Broadway’s “Slave Play,” has been keeping a secret. While adjusting to the spotlight that comes with a much-talked-about Broadway debut — he has recently been a guest on “Morning Joe” and “Late Night With Seth Meyers” — he has also been using a pseudonym to develop an even […]

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He Took Her Parts in ‘Fires in the Mirror.’ All 29 of Them.

On August 19, 1991, in the Crown Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, a car in the motorcade of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, leader of the Lubavitch Hasidic movement, sped through a red light, struck another car, swerved onto the sidewalk and hit and killed Gavin Cato, a 7-year-old black boy from Guyana, while severely injuring his […]

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From Annie to Tina Turner, and Trained to Go the Distance

“There is only one.” That’s the tagline for “Tina: The Tina Turner Musical,” which opens on Broadway Nov. 7. When Adrienne Warren, who plays the title role, saw those words, she took them personally, but she didn’t disagree. “She’s incomparable,” Warren, 32, said of Turner. “I looked at it and thought, ‘I know there’s only […]

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Seeing ‘Oklahoma!’ One More Time? She Cain’t Say No

Legs splayed and eyelashes batting, the comic cowboy Will Parker was flirting with a woman seated in the front row at “Oklahoma!” The audience whooped as her neighbors squirmed. Tricia Tait cackled from across the theater, clearly in on the joke. “I’ve been in that gal’s seat before,” she whispered. A Bud Light was cracked […]

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What Generations of Gay Men Hand Down in ‘The Inheritance’

ImageThe younger cast members of “The Inheritance.” Clockwise from top left: Carson McCalley, Dylan Frederick, Andrew Burnap, Samuel H. Levine, Jonathan Burke, Jordan Barbour, Kyle Harris, Darryl Gene Daughtry Jr., Kyle Soller and Arturo Luís Soria.Credit…Erik Tanner for The New York Times “I can’t imagine what those years were like,” says a young gay man […]

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How Do You Impersonate Judy Garland? Ask a Drag Queen

Half a century after Judy Garland died and 80 years after “The Wizard of Oz” made her famous, she remains the rare golden-age performer whose popularity and mythology reach beyond Las Vegas and the Turner Classic Movies channel. Last year, Lady Gaga’s performance in “A Star Is Born” alerted many younger viewers to Garland’s in […]

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Think He’s a Jerk? Then He’s Doing His Job

Ian Barford can tell when the audience turns against him. It begins with a kiss, and escalates during a breakup scene. By the time he hobbles through a door, desperate to reconcile, “they’re just hissing at me, practically throwing things at me,” Barford said. The whole audience? “The women,” he clarified. “The men are usually […]

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Zawe Ashton: On Broadway and Off Broadway, All at Once

For the last five weeks, the British actress and playwright Zawe Ashton has been zipping back and forth between West 45th Street and Lower Manhattan. She has gone from speaking the words of her character Emma in an acclaimed Broadway revival of Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal” to watching her own words brought to life by a […]

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‘For Colored Girls’ Review: Ntozake Shange’s Women Endure

Their individuality was always undeniable. But in their latest appearance on a New York stage, it’s clear that their combined strength is what has made these women so vital, so enduring. There are, technically, seven title characters in “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf,” Ntozake Shange’s milestone work of theater […]

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