Tag: Children and Childhood

Tae Keller Wins Newbery Medal for ‘When You Trap a Tiger’

The American Library Association announced two of the country’s most prestigious prizes for children’s books on Monday: the Newbery Medal, which went to Tae Keller for “When You Trap a Tiger,” and the Caldecott Medal, an award for picture books, for “We Are Water Protectors,” illustrated by Michaela Goade. “When You Trap a Tiger,” published […]

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There’s No Easy Fix for Children’s Weight Gain

Dr. White said it was important not to view pandemic weight gain as a product only of diet and exercise behaviors. “The social context and the physical context of our families is so incredibly important in terms of their risk of weight gain,” she said. My colleague Dr. Mary Jo Messito, who directs the pediatric […]

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Adoption Used to Be Hush-Hush. This Book Amplifies the Human Toll.

Adoption agencies became the middleman to meet both needs. And in the rush to create perfect families — and to collect a fee for each child they placed — agencies like Louise Wise blurred what, through today’s lens, are clear ethical lines. Not only did the agencies fail to consider “the lifelong emotional impact of […]

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‘I Know I’m Not Alone’: The Importance of Mentors Right Now

“We tried to do virtual open houses and to start background checks,” Ms. Content said, “but we stopped since we couldn’t bring anyone in for interviews or observe candidates interacting with young people,” which is an important process to monitor, she explained, when such a vulnerable demographic is involved. Almost 250 mentees are on a […]

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A Living Legacy in Pediatric Cancer Research

According to Dr. Renbarger, “in about 85 to 90 percent of cases, we’ve found something clinically relevant about the patient or the tumor as a result of testing to help further guide therapy.” Dr. Renbarger is drawn to targeted therapies because they “may have fewer side effects than previous treatments, helping the child have a […]

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A Stutter Brought Biden and This Teen Together. Now He’s Writing a Book About It.

They bonded nearly a year ago after Joseph R. Biden Jr. bent down to greet Brayden Harrington, a 13-year-old boy who stutters, at a campaign stop in New Hampshire. “Don’t let it define you,” Mr. Biden said, squeezing Brayden’s shoulder and looking him in the eye. “You are smart as hell.” Months later, Brayden spoke […]

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Children’s Screen Time Has Soared in the Pandemic, Alarming Parents and Researchers

Over all, children’s screen time had doubled by May as compared with the same period in the year prior, according to Qustodio, a company that tracks usage on tens of thousands of devices used by children, ages 4 to 15, worldwide. The data showed that usage increased as time passed: In the United States, for […]

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What Does a More Contagious Virus Mean for Schools?

“When we look at what’s happened in the U.K. and think about this new variant, and we see all the case numbers going up, we have to remember it in the context of schools being open with virtually no modification at all,” Dr. Jenkins said. “I would like to see a real-life example of that […]

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Book Review: ‘Troubled,’ by Kenneth R. Rosen

As soon as she comes home, Hazel reverts to her former self, and her problems continue for years. This is also true of Rosen’s next subject, Avery, a child-abuse victim whose godmother promised her a shopping spree to get her in the car before dropping her at a wilderness program that preceded her time at […]

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An Appreciation for Vaccines, and How Far They Have Come

The first pertussis vaccines were developed and tested in the 1920s and 1930s and were in universal use by the end of the 1940s. And they worked. Dr. James Cherry, a distinguished research professor of pediatrics at David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and an expert on pertussis who […]

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Foster Care Was Always Tough. Covid-19 Made It Tougher.

The last step in the long journey to adopt a child through the foster care system is the courtroom finalization. Though mostly a formality, it’s traditionally provided an important opportunity for loved ones to gather and pose for pictures as a judge blesses the creation of a new “forever family” with a smack of the […]

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Gary Paulsen’s Real-Life Survival Guide

GONE TO THE WOODSSurviving a Lost ChildhoodBy Gary Paulsen Authors’ childhood experiences — no matter how joyous or upsetting — often lay the groundwork for their fiction. Gary Paulsen’s name is synonymous with gritty survivalist stories, so it should come as no surprise that his memoir, “Gone to the Woods,” leaves you gritting your teeth […]

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The Sperm Kings Have a Problem: Too Much Demand

There have always been infertile straight couples in need of donor sperm, but with the legalization of gay marriage and the rise of elective single motherhood, the market has expanded over the last decade. About 20 percent of sperm bank clients are heterosexual couples, 60 percent are gay women, and 20 percent are single moms […]

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Juggling My Children, Their Alcoholic Sitter and My Own Sobriety

The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous says she should stay. Being of use is important, it says. The fellowship of another alcoholic is crucial, it says. Still, I wish she hadn’t confessed. I wish she hadn’t told me over the kitchen island, in front of the children as they were eating spaghetti, as they were […]

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The Challenge of Parenting While Watching a Mob Storm the Capitol

Like many of us, I stood speechless yesterday as I watched rioters storm the nation’s Capitol. My daughters, ages 10 and 17, watched alongside me and were shocked, too. Feeling rattled and helpless, I wanted someone to look after me much more than I wanted to do any parenting myself. As a psychologist, I’m used […]

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Kai Jones, at 14, Is a Veteran Freeskiing Daredevil

Although the sport of freeriding or freeskiing — which means skiing or snowboarding on ungroomed, usually off-piste terrain without a set course — is not currently included in the Winter Olympics, Kai has other interests and options, like college film study programs. Todd Jones joked that everything his son had done so far might be […]

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How to Take Your Family Geocaching

If it feels as if you’ve already explored every last nook and cranny of your cramped lockdown life know this: Right under your nose, there’s a hidden world operating entirely out of view. That world is geocaching, a no-contact game of hide-and-seek between hundreds of thousands of strangers. Players hide caches — waterproof containers, usually […]

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Do Kids Really Need to Learn to Code?

Unemployment has remained a great concern in India over time, and parents forced their children, irrespective of their aptitudes, to become doctors or engineers or to get management degrees because of the fear that if their children did not join any of those professions, they were certain to be failures. Mr. Bajaj, who studied engineering […]

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5 Things to Do This New Year’s Weekend

Since September, the Joyce Theater has been offering a free virtual fall season that is as good as some of its best in-person ones. The secret has been surprise and an avoidance of the usual suspects. If that is a little less true of the latest batch of videos — available through Sunday at joyce.org/joycestream […]

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5 Dance Picture Books

I WILL DANCEWritten by Nancy Bo FloodIllustrated by Julianna Swaney “I want to dance, but I can hardly move.” In “I Will Dance,” Nancy Bo Flood parts the curtain on the life of a girl who was born with cerebral palsy and expected to live “one minute, maybe two, not 10 years of minutes.” Our […]

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Hilaria Baldwin Talks Spain, Boston, Alec and Instagram

Ms. Baldwin first visited Spain with her parents when she was a baby, she said, and she went at least yearly thereafter. She declined to explain in detail how frequently they traveled there or how long they stayed. “I think it would be maddening to do such a tight time line of everything. You know, […]

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How the Pandemic Has Been Devastating for Children From Low-Income Families

Since the coronavirus arrived in her neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., this past spring, 11-year-old Grenderline Etheridge has burst into tears many times for reasons she cannot explain. She has crawled into bed with her mother, something she had not done for a very long time. Her siblings also have had trouble: Her brothers, who […]

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