Tag: Families and Family Life

Writing From Real Life, in All Its Excruciating Detail

OSLO — One year after the publication of her novel “Will and Testament,” the Norwegian author Vigdis Hjorth was at home with her two daughters when she received a surprising email. Hjorth’s widely read 2016 book, which tells the story of an Oslo woman who accuses her father of sexually assaulting her as a child, […]

Read More

Cory Booker’s Unique Strength: 80-Plus Relatives in Iowa

WEST DES MOINES, Iowa — Travel with Senator Cory Booker and it will quickly become apparent that he has family in nearly every politically important state for a presidential candidate. His mother lives in Nevada. There’s the uncle from North Carolina, and a cousin in Florida. In Iowa, the most important state to Mr. Booker’s […]

Read More

This Top Gifted and Talented School Is Integrated. Is It the Future?

Every morning, students from each of New York City’s five boroughs pull on red plaid uniforms and head to an unusual school in East Harlem. TAG Young Scholars is one of the highest-performing schools in the city. It is also the only ultra-selective gifted and talented school in New York that is more than a […]

Read More

Stay-at-Home Parents Work Hard. Should They Be Paid?

ImageA 1976 poster by Jacquie Ursula Caldwell.CreditLibrary of Congress It’s not uncommon in the United States for two parents to spend long hours working hard — but the one who works outside the home is paid for it, while the one who does housework and child care is paid nothing. Now, several Democratic presidential candidates […]

Read More

Intensive Care: What Makes a ‘Good’ Parent?

Last year when Patrick Ishizuka published a parenting study, he set off another round of discussion about what we call good parenting, and who is able to do it. The study looked at the results of a nationally representative survey in which parents were presented with fictional vignettes about elementary school-aged children; alternate responses suggested […]

Read More

Weeknight Dinner Around the World

Bangkok, Thailand Wasa Khuhaprema, center, prepares dinner for her family, including her parents, with help from her two young sons; the boys cook at least one night a week. This night, they ate an omelet with carrots, stir-fried minced pork and eggplant, and southern Thai sour curry with cauliflower. Family members are expected to clean […]

Read More

Cats Like People! (Some People, Anyway)

In the perennial battle over dogs and cats, there’s a clear public relations winner. Dogs are man’s best friend. They’re sociable, faithful and obedient. Our relationship with cats, on the other hand, is often described as more transactional. Aloof, mysterious and independent, cats are with us only because we feed them. Or maybe not. On […]

Read More

Saving Money, and Your Sanity, on College Visits (Hint: Resist the Swag)

College application season is approaching, and that means prospective students are in the midst of campus visits. Nearly half of students starting college in the fall of 2017 said a visit was “very important” in their decision, according to a report in April from the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California, Los […]

Read More

What to Do When Your Tween Is Trash-Talking You

“I don’t want to hurt your feelings, Mom, but I don’t want you picking out my clothes anymore,” my very independent 10-year-old daughter announced recently. “We have different taste, and yours isn’t good for me.” Her in-your-face delivery has the tone of an athlete taunting someone on a rival sports team. When did I become […]

Read More

‘I Put My Own Life on Hold’: The Pain and Joy of Caring for Parents

Daughters said they sacrificed careers when their relatives wouldn’t. Others said hiring help sapped finances. And more than a few found treasured final moments with loved ones despite the overwhelming work of caring for them. After The Times published a pair of articles on elder care — one about a Connecticut home health aide and […]

Read More

Does America Care About Care? Not Enough

First of three articles. Caretaking occupies a paradoxical place in the American mind. On the one hand, we cast caretaking for babies and children as a sacred duty of the private sphere. We lionize the bonds between parents and their children in movies, songs and storybooks. We romanticize the kinds of wisdom that are passed […]

Read More

The Studio That Turned Out to Be a Family Heirloom

Lindsay Rosenblum, a New Orleans native, thought it was a happy coincidence when she realized that a West Village studio she was thinking about renting happened to be in a building where her mother and uncle lived in the late 1970s. On a train to New York from Boston to start her hunt for apartments […]

Read More