Tag: Writing and Writers

An Interview With Caroline Calloway’s Ghostwriter, Natalie Beach

ImageThrough the dirty lens of history: Caroline Calloway, left, and Natalie Beach. CreditNatalie Beach In its top left corner, Instagram invites you to share “your story.” The platform’s savviest users log on not to share what’s happening with them spontaneously, but to create the story of themselves. Natalie Beach, a writer who helped her college friend […]

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‘This Is a Possibility’: Akwaeke Emezi Writes a Trans Story Where Nobody Gets Hurt

After “Freshwater,” Akwaeke Emezi’s critically acclaimed debut novel, came out in 2018, publishers were eager for more from the Nigerian writer. Emezi, 32, was ready, having already sold “Pet,” a young adult novel, to Make Me a World, a diversity-focused imprint of Penguin Random House, and signing a lucrative two-book deal with Riverhead. The first, […]

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James Atlas, an Ambassador for Biographies, Dies at 70

James Atlas, a leading figure in New York literary circles as an editor and publisher and as a writer whose books included well-regarded biographies of Saul Bellow and the poet Delmore Schwartz, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. He was 70. His wife, Dr. Anna Fels, said his death, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, was […]

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Previously Unknown Sources Come Forward in a New Book About Harvey Weinstein

Two years before the allegations of sexual harassment and abuse against Harvey Weinstein became public, his own brother and business partner, Bob Weinstein, confronted him, pleading with him to get medical treatment for what he described as many years of “misbehavior.” “You have brought shame to the family and your company through your misbehavior,” Bob […]

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Cheating, Inc.: How Writing Papers for American College Students Has Become a Lucrative Profession Overseas

By Farah Stockman and Carlos Mureithi Sept. 7, 2019 Tuition was due. The rent was, too. So Mary Mbugua, a university student in Nyeri, Kenya, went out in search of a job. At first, she tried selling insurance policies, but that only paid on commission and she never sold one. Then she sat behind the […]

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‘Giovanni’s Room’ Revisited

Nobody wanted it. Certainly not the folks at Alfred A. Knopf, who published his first novel, “Go Tell It on the Mountain,” in 1953. Back then, the young James Baldwin — he was just 28 when “Mountain” came out — had a protector named William Cole, who was Knopf’s publicity director. Always on the lookout […]

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‘I’m Too Old to Be Scared by Much’: Margaret Atwood on Her ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Sequel

TORONTO — Margaret Atwood wasn’t sure she had a “Handmaid’s Tale” sequel in her, even as fans clamored for one. “What they were begging for was a continuation in the voice of Offred, which I would not have been able to do,” she said over tea and juice at a cafe near her home. “You […]

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Harry Potter Brought Him to Broadway. Now His Work is Everywhere.

LONDON — Jack Thorne has no shortage of ways to characterize his own eccentricity. “I’m a slightly deranged adult.” “I’m not very good with other people.” “I’m mental.” He points out a Ralph Steadman poster on the wall of his book-lined home office, an image grotesque enough to prompt objections from his 3-year-old son. “I […]

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Anonymous Stories for the Instagram Age

Handwriting is not dead. On a recent Thursday at the Fountain House Gallery in Hell’s Kitchen, 70 people milled about and read some 800 handwritten stories that were hung on clothespins along lengths of twine affixed to the wall. Each row of stories had a string of fairy lights glowing between them. Passers-by stop to […]

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Life Is Imitating Stephen King’s Art, and That Scares Him

Stephen King wouldn’t still be in business if all he had to sell was fear. Within every terrifying story about a shape-shifting killer clown, homicidal father in a haunted hotel or super flu that depopulates the planet, the relentlessly prolific writer has filled his pages with equally powerful supplies of strength, selflessness and even hope. […]

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What Beyoncé Taught Veronica Chambers, Past Tense Editor, About Self-Motivation

You’re reading In Her Words, where women rule the headlines. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox. Let us know what you think at inherwords@nytimes.com. “My conservative estimate is that I’ve received over 5,000 rejections in my life. So I’ve had a lot of practice at picking myself back up.” — Veronica […]

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Trump’s Twitter War on Spelling

It was late May, and the president of the United States could not seem to get off Twitter. The low IQ-ness of Joe Biden. The idiocy of the Democrats. The Wall! The opinions spewed forth like unguided missiles, delighting those who support Donald Trump and dismaying those who do not. As he followed along from […]

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No, Your Kid Shouldn’t Get a Gold Star for Reading

A novelist recently told me that before having kids, she came up with a brilliant plan. Instead of punishing her child for misdeeds, she would instead order her to read a book. How better to turn a timeout into something productive and positive? She excitedly informed an experienced parent about her plan who told her […]

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A Novelist Inspired by the Cold War, a C.I.A. Typing Pool and ‘Dr. Zhivago’

AUSTIN, Tex. — In 2018, two weeks before Lara Prescott’s agents sent publishers the manuscript of her first novel — about the C.I.A. plot to influence Cold War Russia with the banned love story “Doctor Zhivago” — a famous male writer warned her, “You’re not going to get anything for this. You need to edit […]

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17 New Books to Watch For in September

After the sleepy months of summer, September brings a windfall of new titles. Fans of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” rejoice: Decades after the novel was published, Margaret Atwood returns with a sequel. A new biography of Susan Sontag — a 700-page, exhaustive, doorstop of a book — explores her intellectual development and sexuality in unsparing detail. […]

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If Kafka Was Israeli and Wrote About Talking Goldfish

The car crash brought it all into focus. For the short-story writer Etgar Keret, a new collection usually takes shape in response to some overwhelming event in his life. He’ll be writing his three- or four-page tales, saving them to folders on his computer that he occasionally loses, then boom, something happens that ties them […]

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