Tag: Shutdowns (Institutional)

When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

JERUSALEM — As the United States and other countries anxiously consider how to reopen schools, Israel, one of the first countries to do so, illustrates the dangers of moving too precipitously. Confident it had beaten the coronavirus and desperate to reboot a devastated economy, the Israeli government invited the entire student body back in late […]

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For Greece’s Theaters, the Coronavirus Is a Tragedy

EPIDAURUS, Greece — As dusk fell here on Saturday, a white-robed chorus filed onto the sparse stage of a limestone amphitheater for the National Theater of Greece’s production of “The Persians,” the world’s oldest surviving dramatic work. In 472 B.C., when Aeschylus’s play was first performed, the actors would have been wearing masks. This time, […]

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‘The Biggest Monster’ Is Spreading. And It’s Not the Coronavirus.

It begins with a mild fever and malaise, followed by a painful cough and shortness of breath. The infection prospers in crowds, spreading to people in close reach. Containing an outbreak requires contact tracing, as well as isolation and treatment of the sick for weeks or months. This insidious disease has touched every part of […]

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A Better Year for Trump’s Family Business (Last Year, That Is)

Before the coronavirus ripped through the country, upending President Trump’s family business and the broader hospitality industry, the company last year showed modest gains, according to Mr. Trump’s annual financial disclosure report released late Friday. The disclosure report, which offers the only official public detailing of the president’s personal finances, had been delayed for months […]

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Nello, Beloved by Rich New Yorkers, Is Dinged Over Illicit Indoor Dining

Nello, an Italian restaurant and celebrity hot spot on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, has long been a showroom for wealthy New Yorkers undeterred by its lofty prices. When the coronavirus pandemic forced the venue to shut its dining room, its flamboyant spirit was on full display. To promote public health, the restaurant placed […]

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In Britain, the Economic Comeback Is in the Suburbs

READING, England — The British economy is facing its worst recession since “The Great Frost” of 1709, a horrifically cold winter. Large retailers are shutting stores, and inconsistent quarantine rules are raising anxiety about a second pandemic wave. And yet Summertown, a suburb north of Oxford, has something to look forward to: Its main shopping […]

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Are Massage Therapists Considered Essential Workers?

ImageIn mid-July, Gov. Gavin Newsom gave guidelines for barber shops, nail salons and massage businesses that allowed them to stay in practice, if they moved outdoors.Credit…Mario Anzuoni/Reuters Good morning. You cannot give a massage over Zoom. And that means California’s decisions to declare many massage therapists as nonessential workers has made their lives especially challenging […]

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How 2 New York Schools Became Models for Coping in a Pandemic

Around 3 a.m. one day this past spring, a math teacher at Mott Haven Academy was stirred awake by the buzz of a text message. It was from a student, who wrote that his mother had just died from the coronavirus. The Bronx charter school, still in the process of switching to remote learning, sprang […]

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Record Low for U.S. G.D.P. as Coronavirus Takes Huge Toll

The coronavirus pandemic’s toll on the nation’s economy became emphatically clearer Thursday as the government detailed the most devastating three-month collapse on record. Gross domestic product, the broadest measure of goods and services produced, fell 9.5 percent in the second quarter of the year as consumers cut back spending, businesses pared investments and global trade […]

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Virus Cases Are Rising in N.J., Spurred by Young Partygoers at the Shore

Coronavirus cases in New Jersey, which just a week ago had plunged to their lowest levels since the pandemic began, are rising again, fueled in part by outbreaks among young adults along the Jersey Shore. In the past seven days, New Jersey has recorded an average of 416 cases per day, an increase of 28 […]

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The New College Drop-Off

Maureen Rayhill of Seattle sounds like a public health official as she describes the current process for coronavirus testing, rattling off research she’s done on in-person testing centers versus mail-order companies and how their turnaround times for results compare. But she’s not. She’s a mother, just trying to get her oldest child to college. The […]

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A Viral Epidemic Splintering Into Deadly Pieces

Once again, the coronavirus is ascendant. As infections mount across the country, it is dawning on Americans that the epidemic is now unstoppable, and that no corner of the nation will be left untouched. As of Tuesday, the pathogen had infected at least 4.3 million Americans, killing almost 150,000. Many experts fear the virus could […]

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A Viral Epidemic Splintering Into Deadly Pieces

Once again, the coronavirus is ascendant. As infections mount across the country, it is dawning on Americans that the epidemic is now unstoppable, and that no corner of the nation will be left untouched. As of Tuesday, the pathogen had infected at least 4.3 million Americans, killing almost 150,000. Many experts fear the virus could […]

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Why Is There No Consensus About Reopening Schools?

Is it possible to reopen school buildings in the fall in a way that keeps kids, educators, staff and their families and communities safe from Covid-19? Is it possible not to do so without harming them in other ways? Already, school closures have set children behind academically. More than 20 million children rely on school […]

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GDP Q2 Report: Why You’ll See Two Figures for Decline

When the Commerce Department releases its preliminary estimate for second-quarter economic output on Thursday morning, the numbers will be historically terrible. They will also be confusing. Forecasters expect the report to show that gross domestic product — the broadest measure of goods and services produced in the United States — fell at an annual rate […]

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The Pandemic Could End the Age of Midpriced Dining

MELBOURNE, Australia — When Victor Liong reopened his restaurant on AC/DC Lane in Melbourne’s city center in June, after months of a coronavirus shutdown order, he carefully considered his options. Since its opening in 2013, Lee Ho Fook had been a restaurant that could cater to just about any occasion. You could stop in at […]

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Florida Man Bought Lamborghini With Coronavirus Aid, U.S. Say

A man in Florida who received nearly $4 million in federal loans intended to help struggling businesses — and spent the money on a new Lamborghini Huracán sports car and other fraudulent purchases — was arrested and charged with three felonies, officials said on Monday. David T. Hines, 29, of Miami, was charged with bank fraud, […]

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Urban Explorers Give Modern Ruins a Second Life

For Jake Williams, nothing means success like wrack and ruin. Mr. Williams had studied business marketing in college before withdrawing and pursuing a full-time career as an urban explorer, researching and telling the stories of abandoned properties. He films his excursions and, as the producer of Bright Sun Films, shares them on YouTube. The subjects […]

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These Businesses Lasted Decades. The Virus Closed Them for Good.

A gun store that opened in 1911. An Irish pub that had drawn crowds since the Reagan administration. A coffee shop that sheltered frightened Brooklyn residents during the 2001 terrorist attacks. These small businesses — John Jovino Gun Shop in Little Italy, Coogan’s in Washington Heights and Cranberry’s in Brooklyn Heights — are among the […]

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Slowly, Italy Is Waking From the Coronavirus Nightmare

ROME — Streets are quiet, squares are empty, you can hear the gurgling of the city’s ubiquitous fountains in the daytime. The platoons of Chinese tourists are nowhere to be seen; the American travelers — their hats, their sandals, their holiday shorts — have disappeared. Only a few German families with young children brave the […]

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Empty Towers, No Power Lunches: Ghostly Midtown Is Omen for N.Y.C.

Editors and account managers at the Time & Life Building in Midtown Manhattan could once walk out through the modernist lobby and into a thriving ecosystem that existed in support of the offices above. They could shop for designer shirts or shoes, slide into a steakhouse corner booth for lunch and then return to their […]

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A Visit to the Classrooms the Kids Left Behind

Over a million New York City students and teachers are still unsure of when and how they might return to school this fall. Their classrooms are capsules of those panicked final days in March, when schools abruptly shut down to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. As a parent, it feels impossible to keep up […]

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Safe to Go Out? Republicans and Democrats Widely Split

Democrats and Republicans are reacting very differently to the coronavirus pandemic. And the divide goes far beyond whether to wear a mask. A majority of Republicans say they would feel comfortable flying on an airplane, eating indoors in a restaurant or seeing a movie in a theater. Large majorities of Democrats and political independents say […]

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Covid Pandemic and Recession Hurt Nonprofits as Need Surges

In the grip of the coronavirus pandemic, the Y.M.C.A. has provided a lifeline to many vulnerable Americans. As the health crisis and its economic disruption eat away at the group’s revenues, the question is whether anyone will throw a lifeline to the rescuers. The group’s 2,600 outposts transformed in the first wave of illness into […]

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Rise in Unemployment Claims Signals an Economic Reversal

New state unemployment claims increased last week for the first time in nearly four months, disturbing evidence that the struggling economy is backsliding at a time when coronavirus cases are on the rise. After a flood of claims as the pandemic shut businesses early in the spring, weekly unemployment filings fell sharply before flattening in […]

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After Picking Up Work Here and There, No Unemployment Check

Annie Frodeman often worked 40 hours a week or more — full time by most lights. She just worked them at two jobs. Four or five mornings a week before the coronavirus outbreak, she worked as an airport ramp agent for Piedmont Airlines in Burlington, Vt. — hoisting bags on and off planes, refilling the […]

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The One Change That Could Save Your Neighborhood Stores

For the typical small business, rent is an enormous expense, second only to payroll. And there’s no blueprint for how small-business owners should deal with their landlords during an economy-toppling pandemic. Here’s one option: ignore your landlord and plan on resuming rent payments when sales hopefully improve, and try to not get evicted in the […]

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How to Sell Books in 2020: Put Them Near the Toilet Paper

If you want to sell books during a pandemic, it turns out that one of the best places to do it is within easy reach of eggs, milk and diapers. When the coronavirus forced the United States into lockdown this spring, stores like Walmart and Target, which were labeled essential, remained open. So when anxious […]

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65 Million Tourists, Gone From N.Y.C.

ImageCredit…September Dawn Bottoms/The New York Times They walk a bit too slowly, crowd Times Square and gobble up street vendors’ hot dogs. No, not pigeons: tourists. Before the pandemic, in 2018, the city welcomed a record 65 million tourists from around the world. Those visitors spent $44 billion — money that was crucial to keeping […]

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N.Y.C. Enters Phase 4, but Restaurants and Bars Are Left Behind

For the 25,000 restaurants and bars in New York City, Monday was supposed to be a day of celebration — the turning point when the city would enter Phase 4, the final phase of reopening after the coronavirus outbreak. Instead, the start of Phase 4 marks a roadblock on New Yorkers’ path to normalcy and […]

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With Tourists Gone, St. Patrick’s Cathedral Pleads for Help

St. Patrick’s Cathedral, one of the most famous churches in the United States, has long depended on tourists and office workers to fill its pews and its collection plates. But now that the coronavirus has left Midtown Manhattan largely deserted, it is facing a $4 million budget shortfall that may threaten its ability to pay […]

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