Tag: Real Estate and Housing (Residential)

Why Black Homeowners in Brooklyn Are Being Victimized by Fraud

Broadies Byas’s home is a hidden gem. From the outside, it looks unassuming, if somewhat neglected. But past the porch of the Victorian townhouse a rich interior reveals itself: tall ceilings, a mahogany staircase, stained glass doors and picture frames virtually untouched since the home was built in 1856. The house, in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood […]

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As Homelessness Surges in California, So Does a Backlash

[Sign up for our daily newsletter about news from California here.] OAKLAND, Calif. — Insults like “financial parasites” and “bums” have been hurled at them. Fences, potted plants and other barriers have been erected to keep them off sidewalks. Citizen patrols have been organized, vigilante style, to walk the streets and push them out. California […]

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Everyone Is Dead, but the Pizza Oven Works

“Larry Hall touts his condominium’s high ceilings and spacious living rooms. Then there are the swimming pool, saunas and movie theater. But what really sets the development apart, in his view, is its ability to survive the apocalypse.” (The New York Times) ImageCreditIllustrations by George Wylesol Exquisite perch over smoldering ashes, available for swap or […]

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When the Dream of Owning a Home Became a Nightmare

When tens of thousands of African-Americans held the keys to their first homes in the early 1970s as part of a new federal program that encouraged black homeownership, they thought they were about to fulfill the American dream. Instead they got an American nightmare. The story begins with the urban uprisings of the late 1960s, […]

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First Ones In

Samantha and Jasper Larsen were among the very first residents to move into 277 Fifth Avenue, and they wear that distinction with pride. “We’re the O.G.,” said Ms. Larsen, a 30-year-old executive assistant at a private equity firm, referring to the term, “Original Gangster.” “We got our foot in the door before the other tenants.” […]

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The Return of Golden Age Design

Once the scaffolding comes down and construction crews move on, the new Beckford House and Tower condominium buildings now taking shape on Manhattan’s Upper East Side could easily be mistaken for structures built nearly a century ago. On the outside, the two buildings, which have already topped out at 301 East 80th Street and 301 […]

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1,713 Mammoth Boilers, and Winter Weeks Away

The seven steel boilers should have been replaced years ago. Instead, they continue to sputter inside a cavernous brick building, producing steam that travels through a maze of old pipes providing heat and hot water to the Breukelen Houses in Canarsie, Brooklyn, a public housing complex where 3,500 people live. On a recent morning, a […]

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Empty Garages: The Answer to California’s Housing Shortage?

“Steps from USC campus, a modern, newly built detached studio apartment. Full kitchen w/ brand-new gas stove, dishwasher. Washer/dryer, full bath, a/c, bedroom nook, ready-to-go entertainment hookups. Scandinavian design appeal. Walking distance to L.A. Metro. $1,400/month.” A dream Los Angeles rental listing? At 20 percent below market, in a neighborhood where the alternative is a […]

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An Artist’s Personal Museum in Brooklyn

When Nayland Blake’s ever-expanding vinyl collection threatened to take over their railroad-style one-bedroom apartment in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, the artist and educator, who uses “they” and “them” pronouns, transformed the 2,500 or so records into an immersive installation. Blake, whose work explores the fluidity of race and gender, has long been an accumulator […]

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WeWork Planned a Residential Utopia. It Hasn’t Turned Out That Way.

After first pledging to upend the way people worked, WeWork vowed to change how they lived: WeLive, a sleek dormitory for working professionals with free beer, arcade games in the laundry room and catered Sunday dinners, would spread around the world. It has not quite turned out that way. WeLive has not expanded beyond its […]

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Who’s Afraid of a Transit Desert?

For a city crisscrossed with subway and rail lines, New York has its share of remote outposts — considered by some to be transit deserts, but to others urban oases. Now a growing number of bargain hunters, including real estate developers, are homing in on properties farther from the train — at least a 15-minute […]

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Their Friends Come for Dinner — and Remake Their Home

LIKE MANY OF the millions of immigrants who have arrived in New York City in the last three centuries, Laila Gohar and Omar Sosa live in one of the downtown walk-ups that were built to accommodate the surge of new residents who have defined the city’s culture since the mid-1800s. Less common, though, is the […]

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The Green Revolution Spreading Across Our Rooftops

When David Michaels moved to Chicago this year, he chose the Emme apartment building in part because of the third-floor green roof, which has a lawn, an area for grilling, fire pits and a 3,000-square-foot vegetable garden. “The green space was a huge factor in choosing this apartment,” Mr. Michaels said. “My wife and I […]

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In Berlin, a Creative Paradise That’s Easiest to Reach by Boat

Thirty years ago, when the Berlin Wall came down, the city was left with huge swaths of empty buildings in the former East: old German Democratic Republic embassies and factory complexes, some still riddled with toxic waste. It was both a daunting and heady opportunity for Berlin to reinvent itself and start over. Artists and […]

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Bill de Blasio Needs to Get to Work

In 1972, Mayor John Lindsay came home to New York in April after winning just 7 percent of the vote in the Wisconsin Democratic presidential primary, the stench of failure following close behind. “He came back with his tail between his legs,” said Jay Kriegel, who served as Mr. Lindsay’s chief of staff. Back home, […]

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For Churches, a Temptation to Sell

The Church of the Redeemer, at Pacific and Fourth Avenues in Brooklyn, had been closed to the public since 2010.CreditChristopher Lee for The New York Times A rendering of Five Six One Pacific, which is being built on the site of the church.Creditrendering by Visualisation One The sight of old spires squeezed between new towering […]

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Let’s Fill Our Cities With Taller, Wooden Buildings

Across North America, trees stand ready to help us solve the climate crisis. Trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store it in their wood. One way to respond to a challenge from the United Nations secretary general, António Guterres, to seek “bold action and much greater ambition” on climate change is to protect […]

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A Roof of One’s Own, With or Without the Gingerbread

DETROIT — Colorful little homes are springing up alongside an arid freeway bank in the Dexter-Linwood neighborhood here, a few miles northwest of downtown. Although tourists sometimes think the buildings are playthings and knock on the doors, the site is actually intended to help solve desperate urban problems. “Every single house is different on purpose,” […]

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What if You Could Rent an Apartment Without a Security Deposit?

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] Nothing is certain in the grueling hunt for a New York City apartment, except perhaps the inevitability of shelling out thousands of dollars upfront in broker fees, one month’s rent and a security deposit. In 2016, New York City […]

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