Tag: Real Estate and Housing (Residential)

The Cursed Legacy of the Most Expensive Plot of Land in Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES — A giant vacant lot that sits atop Beverly Hills, known as both “The Mountain” and “The Vineyard,” finally sold this week after sitting on the market for a year — not for the billion dollars at which it was initially priced but for $100,000, in foreclosure, to a lone bidder. It’s an […]

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Can a Puppy Help Sell Your Home?

When Kelcey Otten, a Compass agent, recently received a listing at 80 East End Avenue in Manhattan, she immediately saw an opportunity. The one-bedroom co-op is in a pet-friendly building. Ms. Otten, who lives in Brooklyn Heights, was fostering two abandoned dogs in her apartment that were in desperate need of forever homes. “I thought […]

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Who’s to Blame When Algorithms Discriminate?

When the Fair Housing Act was passed in 1968, the injustice it aimed to root out in the housing market was often egregious: Real estate agents steered black families away from white neighborhoods; landlords refused to rent to them; and property managers’ racism was plainly stated in apartment listings. The culprits were clear and their […]

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When You Give Your House Keys to a Stranger

One Saturday afternoon in late May, I puzzled over my toilet seat, attempting to decipher the strange Hieroglyphics someone had drawn onto the porcelain surface using Sharpie marker. Or maybe waterproof mascara? Weeks earlier, my husband and I had listed our home for rent through a broker. We live in Cape May, a quaint Victorian […]

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A Gentler Way to Gentrify?

Don’t call the real estate development company Venn a developer. Its founders prefer “neighboring start-up.” And don’t call the company’s tenants, who are scattered across 20 buildings in the quickly gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick, renters. They are “members” or “Venners.” “We describe ourselves as a new way of living,” said Or Bokobza, the chief […]

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‘Keep the Hasidic Out’: A Small-Town Housing Showdown

CHESTER, N.Y. — In a peaceful corner of the Hudson Valley, a broad expanse of land sits at the ready for hundreds of homes ranging between 2,500 and 3,400 square feet, with views of the surrounding hills. There will be a recreation center and tennis courts, and nearly half of the development’s 117 acres will […]

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A Boom Time for the Bunker Business and Doomsday Capitalists

201 FEET UNDERGROUND, Kan. — In his pitch to potential buyers, Larry Hall touts his condominium’s high ceilings and spacious living rooms. Then there are the swimming pool, saunas and movie theater. But what really sets the development apart, in his view, is its ability to survive the apocalypse. Mr. Hall has converted a former […]

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Could Your House Be an Instagram Star?

Erin Vogelpohl has tried mixing darker blues and greens into the décor of her five-bedroom house in Dallas, but they don’t play well with her 447,000 Instagram followers. So she sticks with a soft blush palette, the millennial pink that is ubiquitous on Instagram, and in her living room. For home-décor Instagram influencers like Ms. […]

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Overlooked No More: William Byron Rumford, Pioneering Black Politician in California

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Conor Dougherty When William Byron Rumford Sr. arrived at his hotel in Sacramento the night before starting his first term in the California state legislature, a clerk told him there were no rooms available. But […]

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Housing Crisis Grips Ireland a Decade After Property Bubble Burst

DUBLIN — For generations, the Irish took for granted that affordable, plentiful housing was the bedrock of their economic security and government policy. Not long ago, Ireland had one of the world’s highest rates of homeownership. The last several years have torn up those assumptions, leaving the country in the grip of a worsening housing […]

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A Broadway Performer Finds His Spot in Harlem

When Jawan M. Jackson learned he had landed an ensemble role in “Motown: The Musical” on Broadway in December 2012, he knew he wanted to live in Harlem. Mr. Jackson, a Detroit native, had stayed with a friend there when he came to the city for his callback audition. “It immediately felt comfortable,” he said. […]

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Is This Tower Too Tall for the Lower East Side?

Weather: The week starts cool. Today will be dry and sunny, with temperatures in the low 80s. Alternate-side parking: In effect until Sunday (Eid al-Adha). ImageCreditSarah Blesener for The New York Times On the Lower East Side of Manhattan, developers had been planning three luxury buildings, one of which would stand over 1,000 feet. Then […]

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As Mortgage-Interest Deduction Vanishes, Housing Market Offers a Shrug

PLAINFIELD, Ill. — The mortgage-interest deduction, a beloved tax break bound tightly to the American dream of homeownership, once seemed politically invincible. Then it nearly vanished in middle-class neighborhoods across the country, and it appears that hardly anyone noticed. In places like Plainfield, a southwestern outpost in the area known locally as Chicagoland, the housing […]

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How a Brutal Race Riot Shaped Modern Chicago

“The relation of whites and Negroes in the United States is our most grave and perplexing domestic problem.” So wrote the authors of “The Negro in Chicago,” a landmark 1922 study of a race riot that ripped through that city a century ago this summer. That conflagration, which began on July 27, consumed the city […]

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Plan for Supertall Tower Looming Over Lower East Side Is Halted, for Now

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] The constant charge of high-rise developments that have demolished, rebuilt and reshaped so many New York City neighborhoods has largely marched on unimpeded in recent years despite fierce objections from community groups and preservationists. That changed on Thursday. A […]

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Looking for a Beach House? It’ll Cost You

In the first century B.C., the Roman poet Horace wrote, “Reason and sense remove anxiety/Not villas that look out upon the sea.” Two thousand years later — reasonable or not — people are still paying top dollar for waterfront homes, attracted by hypnotic waves, briny top notes and deep-blue horizons. Even with the effects of […]

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Much Ado About a Little More Housing

The agenda said the Montgomery County Council would vote on an ordinance allowing homeowners in the county, a wealthy Maryland suburb of Washington, D.C., to create basement or backyard apartments, a modest proposal to ease a crucial shortage of affordable housing. The protesters who filled the front rows of the Council chambers last week thought […]

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Lower Rates Already Hit Housing. They’re Not Helping Much.

Cheaper mortgages are usually a boon to the housing market. But this year, a sharp drop in mortgage rates hasn’t provided much of a lift, and that could bode poorly for the Federal Reserve’s efforts to shore up economic growth. To see why, take a look at what has happened in housing since mortgage rates […]

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After a Catastrophic Fire, a Long Road Back

The day the Treadmark apartment building went up in flames in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, James Keefe, the $45 million property’s developer, waited anxiously on the back porch of his home a few blocks away. A few friends and key employees commiserated with Mr. Keefe, a principal at Trinity Financial, as swarms of firefighters […]

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