Tag: Museums

Can Virgil Abloh Fit in a Museum?

CHICAGO — There is one room in “Figures of Speech,” the Virgil Abloh exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, that vividly demonstrates how his aesthetic principles, emotional range and commercial ambitions all cohabitate cozily. On one wall is an Inez & Vinoodh triptych of a young black child playing with Louis Vuitton items, […]

Read More

David Koch, Embraced as an Arts Patron, Even as Criticism Grew

David H. Koch, whose death was announced by his family on Friday, was to some a polarizing figure because of his lavish support of conservative political causes that helped advance Libertarian ideas and the far-right, while countering the science of climate change. But within cultural circles, he was largely uncontroversial, a result of his prodigiously […]

Read More

Art, Exercise or a Nap? All Could Be Yours During a Long Layover

You’ve been in this situation before: After arriving at Chicago O’Hare, or Dallas/Fort Worth, or Boston Logan, your connecting flight is delayed by several hours. Or maybe you have a long layover, and want to make better use of your down time. Sure, you could window shop at Hudson News, or nurse a venti soy […]

Read More

Beep Beep! Who Got the Keys to the Jeep in NYC? Because There’s a Museum of Missy Elliott

Missy Elliott performs onstage at SOMETHING IN THE WATER – Day 2 on April 27, 2019 in Virginia Beach City.Photo: Craig Barritt (Getty Images for Something in the Water) Hit ’em with the hee! Melissa Arnette “Missy” Elliott has a whole museum, y’all! On Wednesday morning, I was scrolling my Twitter timeline minding everyone else’s […]

Read More

The Met Reviews Items It Received From a Dealer, Now a Looting Suspect

Officials of the Indian government and the Metropolitan Museum of Art are discussing whether a number of prized antiquities that the museum began acquiring three decades ago were the product of looting by Subhash Kapoor, a Manhattan art dealer accused of being one of the world’s most prolific smugglers of stolen artifacts. Since 1990, the […]

Read More

Where the Resistance Helped Plan the Liberation of Paris

The tunnel to the subterranean bunker that played a pivotal role in the liberation of Paris is long and narrow, each step down deceptively steep. It takes 100 of those steps to reach the former military command post where, for six days, members of the French Resistance helped orchestrate the city’s release from the Nazi […]

Read More

Art Disappears in Private Hands. Can Social Media Resurface It?

The private art collection of Roberto Toscano and his wife, Nadia Toscano-Palon, features works by artists including Daniel Turner, Anish Kapoor, James Turrell and Oscar Tuazon. Since 2012, the collection has grown to more than 100 works, which are partly in storage because of renovations — and, like most private collections, are rarely seen by […]

Read More

Looking Twice at Renoir and O’Keeffe (Ida, not Georgia)

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — Poor Pierre-Auguste Renoir. On the centennial of his death, his achievements are still something art historians, feminists, artists and critics argue about. His work has not settled quietly into the canon, especially not his nudes, and most especially not his late nudes. There is something invigorating about this state of affairs, which […]

Read More

Summer Art Trek: Gallery Hopping in the Hudson Valley

The day will come this month when you’ll feel compelled to flee the city, at least for an afternoon. Luckily the visionaries of the New York art world have built a number of entrancing destinations around which to organize an easy day trip or a relaxing weekend. With the exception of Jack Shainman’s the School, […]

Read More

Tate Modern Museum in U.K. on Lockdown After Child Falls

LONDON — London’s Tate Modern museum was on lockdown after a child fell from the building, witnesses and the Metropolitan Police said on Sunday. A teenager was arrested in connection with the episode, the police said. The circumstances of the fall and the conditions of the child were not immediately known, but images and video […]

Read More

Manet’s Last Years: A Radical Embrace of Beauty

CHICAGO — I wonder how often he thought back on it: the outrage, the reproaches, the shame, the folly. In 1865, two years after they rejected his “Déjeuner sur l’herbe,” the gatekeepers of the Paris Salon accepted two paintings by Édouard Manet into Europe’s most prestigious exhibition. One was a slablike, Spanish-influenced religious scene of […]

Read More

The Forbidden City Opens Wide as China Projects New Pride in Its Past

ImageVisitors now throng the Forbidden City in Beijing.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times BEIJING — For much of the past century, the Forbidden City has been an imposing void in the otherwise bustling heart of Beijing. The 180-acre compound, where emperors and their advisers plotted China’s course for centuries, was stripped of its purpose […]

Read More

New York Knows Its Arts Organizations Have a Diversity Problem. Now What?

In a city that prides itself on both the diversity of its population and its globally recognized cultural institutions, there is a lopsided reality: While about two-thirds of New Yorkers are people of color, two-thirds of the people who run its cultural institutions are white. This disparity is outlined in the results of a new […]

Read More

At Last, Sam Gilliam’s Star Ascends in New York

Sam Gilliam, the abstract artist who rose to prominence in the 1960s with his large-scale draped canvas paintings, will join Pace Gallery’s roster of artists, the gallery announced Monday. It will be the first time in the 85-year-old painter’s long career that he will be represented by a New York gallery. Considered a master in […]

Read More

After Investigation, Neil deGrasse Tyson Will Keep His Job

Neil deGrasse Tyson, the astrophysicist who leads the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, will keep his job, the institution said on Thursday. The museum has closed an investigation into sexual misconduct accusations against him. “The museum’s investigation into allegations concerning Neil deGrasse Tyson is complete,” a museum spokeswoman said in a […]

Read More

Glimpsing Our Post-Consumption Future at the Cooper Hewitt

Plastics transformed the material world after World War II. Today, they pollute our oceans. A better future will be made with … algae. Or bacteria. That’s the dominant theme of a sweeping exhibition, “Nature: Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial.” On display here at the Smithsonian’s temple to the culture of design, on upper Fifth Avenue, are […]

Read More

Museums Need to Step Into the Future

America’s museums are more than repositories of ancient Greek statues and Renaissance paintings. They are guardians of a fading social and demographic order. On Thursday, Warren Kanders resigned from the board of the Whitney Museum of Art, after protests over his company’s sale of tear gas grenades that were reportedly used on asylum seekers. His […]

Read More

Whitney Trustee Warren Kanders Resigns After Protests Over His Company’s Sale of Tear Gas

A vice chairman of the Whitney Museum of American Art stepped down on Thursday after months of protests over his company’s sale of tear gas, culminating in the withdrawal of eight artists last week from the prestigious Whitney Biennial exhibition. “The targeted campaign of attacks against me and my company that has been waged these […]

Read More