Tag: Museums

Oxford Professor Is Accused of Selling Ancient Texts to Hobby Lobby

ImageThe American chain Hobby Lobby is owned by the Green family, which opened the Museum of the Bible in 2017.CreditJoe Raedle/Getty Images LONDON — A trans-Atlantic investigation conducted by a Washington museum and a London-based archaeological group has accused a prominent Oxford University professor of stealing and selling fragments of ancient texts to Hobby Lobby, […]

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Meeting the ‘Mona Lisa’ for an Intimate (Virtual) Rendezvous

PARIS — Mona Lisa’s lingering smile remains the same, but she is getting a first-of-its-kind virtual makeover from the Louvre Museum, which has struggled this year with the popularity of Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece and the throngs of selfie-snapping tourists. With a blockbuster Leonardo exhibition fast approaching, the Louvre and its production partners are fine-tuning […]

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Hans Haacke, Firebrand, Gets His First U.S. Survey in 33 Years

Anyone who knows much about the defiantly political art of Hans Haacke, filling the New Museum in New York later this month, is bound to feel anxious before meeting the famous firebrand. But when Mr. Haacke showed up for an interview at his dealer’s gallery in Manhattan, what was shocking was his quietude: In sensible […]

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Celebrating 30 Years Ahead of the Curve in Art

KARLSRUHE, Germany — Many of the artworks at Z.K.M. are not so much viewed as braved. One installation on show at the interdisciplinary center for arts and technology is designed to trick visitors into thinking there are security cameras filming inside the bathrooms. (There are not.) But the illusion of surveillance, part of the “Safe […]

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With a $450 Million Expansion, MoMA Is Bigger. Is That Better?

In 1939, the Museum of Modern Art opened its first purpose-built home on West 53rd Street, a taut, rectangular, six-story International Style palazzo clad in Thermolux glass and panels of milky white marble. Stylish and surprisingly homey, the building, designed by Philip L. Goodwin and Edward Durell Stone, replaced four old brownstones. The neighborhood was […]

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Robert Indiana’s Island Home Still Grapples With His Legacy

VINALHAVEN, Me. — Forty-one years ago, when Robert Indiana, the artist, came to this remote island spotted with idle granite quarries, he fell in love with the place, and with a Victorian confection that he would make into his home. Mr. Indiana bought the building, once a meeting hall for the Independent Order of Odd […]

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MoMA Keeps Getting Bigger. Is That Better?

In 1939, the Museum of Modern Art opened its first purpose-built home on West 53rd Street, a taut, rectangular, six-story International Style palazzo clad in Thermolux glass and panels of milky white marble. Stylish and surprisingly homey, the building, designed by Philip L. Goodwin and Edward Durell Stone, replaced four old brownstones. The neighborhood was […]

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Two French Cities, Neither of Them Paris. Which One to Love?

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Oligarchs, as U.S. Arts Patrons, Present a Softer Image of Russia

Vladimir O. Potanin, a Russian billionaire who made his fortune in banking and natural resources, has been a donor and board member of the Guggenheim Museum since 2002. More recently he gave $6.45 million to the Kennedy Center in Washington, which used some of the money to install the “Russian Lounge,” a meeting space, in […]

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‘I Have to Get That’: How Henry Chalfant Became a Graffiti Ambassador

When Henry Chalfant arrived in New York City from suburban Pittsburgh in 1973, as an aspiring sculptor, he found a place teetering on the verge of bankruptcy. This was “Ford to City: Drop Dead” New York. But amid the turmoil a new form of art making was taking shape — one that took up space […]

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The New MoMA Is Here. Get Ready for Change.

Picasso and Braque were looking a little forlorn: unsure of their new home, unsure of their new acquaintances. It was early September, six anxious weeks from the reopening of the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan. After three years of piecemeal renovations, the museum had shut its doors for the summer, preparing for a top-to-bottom […]

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New Scrutiny of Museum Boards Takes Aim at World of Wealth and Status

Warren B. Kanders, a vice chairman of the Whitney Museum of American Art, had just been driven out by a cascading protest over his company’s sale of law enforcement and military supplies. And his fellow trustee Kenneth C. Griffin was livid. So hours after Mr. Kanders resigned in July, Mr. Griffin, a hedge fund titan […]

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Iris van Herpen Designs for Nature

ImageFriezes created by the Dutch fashion designer Iris van Herpen wrap the newly renovated Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands.CreditDmitry Kostyukov for The New York Times LEIDEN, the Netherlands — The imposing red stone edifice rises from an otherwise empty area in this old Dutch city like a mesa in the American West, bound — […]

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