Tag: Books and Literature

Rock Star Patti Smith, Making Paris Swoon

PARIS — The more Patti Smith rips her French audience, the more they love her. She tells the crowd at the Olympia music hall, the scene of concerts by Édith Piaf, Marlene Dietrich and the Beatles, that they should show more appreciation for their beleaguered president because at least he cares about the environment. Five […]

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Ann Patchett Will Eventually Discuss Her Book

NASHVILLE — Although the purpose of this conversation is to promote her new novel, “The Dutch House,” Ann Patchett is in no great hurry to talk about herself. “I think this book could really save the world,” she says, holding up “The Resisters,” by Gish Jen, which is scheduled for release next year. Patchett ordered […]

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Francis Bacon Read Just as He Painted: Deep, Dark and Bleak

PARIS — If good artists borrow while the great ones steal, then Francis Bacon was a particularly savvy thief. His list of artistic influences is a mile long, from Diego Velázquez’s dark Catholic imagery to Picasso’s fragmented perspectives. But perhaps more than any painterly influence, literature shaped Bacon’s art. He thrived off the tragedies, the […]

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U.S. Tries to Seize Edward Snowden’s Proceeds From New Memoir

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department sued the former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden on Tuesday, seeking to seize his proceeds from his new memoir because he did not submit the manuscript for review before it was published so officials could make sure it contained no classified information. Mr. Snowden, whose 2013 leaks of top-secret documents about […]

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Bringing Down Harvey Weinstein

Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play Music | How to Listen In their best-selling new book, “She Said,” the Times reporters Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey recount how they broke the Harvey Weinstein story, work that earned them the Pulitzer Prize and helped solidify #MeToo as an ongoing national movement. On this week’s podcast, the two […]

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She Escaped From Nxivm. Now She’s Written a Book About the Sex Cult.

SCARREDThe True Story of How I Escaped Nxivm, the Cult That Bound My LifeBy Sarah Edmondson with Kristine Gasbarre In 2005, Sarah Edmondson, 28, embarked on a weeklong Caribbean cruise dedicated to spirituality and cinema. Though the fledgling actress lived in a basement apartment and could barely afford the price of passage, she’d been reading […]

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Chris Rock Is Writing a Book on Race and Relationships

Chris Rock, the Emmy-winning comedian and two-time Oscars host, has been talking about race and relationships since he began doing standup in the 1980s. Those who haven’t had seen him onstage will soon be able to read his thoughts on these perennially thorny issues in “My First Black Boyfriend,” a collection of his essays set […]

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Answers to Reader Questions on Our Brett Kavanaugh Essay

The New York Times published an essay in this weekend’s Sunday Review about the culture at Yale when Brett M. Kavanaugh, who now sits on the Supreme Court, was an undergraduate in the 1980s. The piece, which contained a third allegation of sexual misconduct against Justice Kavanaugh, led to questions from readers regarding the reporting […]

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A Big New Biography of Susan Sontag Digs to Find the Person Beneath the Icon

UTRECHT, Netherlands — When asked what she was best known for, Susan Sontag, the formidable 20th-century public intellectual, essayist, novelist and political activist, often told people, with just a hint of irony: the white streak in her dark hair. Sontag, not typically one to downplay her literary achievements or to emphasize her physical attributes, probably […]

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Two Lifetime Crooks Wait for a Missing Daughter, With Shades of Beckett

Maurice Hearne and Charlie Redmond, the antiheroes of the Irish writer Kevin Barry’s buoyant third novel, “Night Boat to Tangier,” are former drug runners — they’re aging and existentialist and twinkling thugs. These two are absconders from responsibility, a pair of croaking ravens, one part Chaplin and two parts Lear. They’re very clearly “two fellows […]

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‘I Think You Need to Rewrite It’: Ruth Reichl on What Makes an Editor Great

Halfway through my last memoir, my editor, Susan Kamil, said, “Maybe you should just move on. This isn’t working.” I threw the phone across the room. I’d been working on the book for a couple of years, sending drafts back and forth to Susan. “I’m sorry,” she continued, “it’s good, but if you’re not willing […]

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Long Before ‘Netflix and Chill,’ He Was the Netflix C.E.O.

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — Long before binge-watching, the streaming wars and “Netflix and chill,” there were two guys barreling down Highway 17 — the California roadway that connects Santa Cruz to Silicon Valley — trying to come up with the next big thing. One was Marc Randolph, an entrepreneur and marketing specialist who had co-founded […]

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David Cameron Says Boris Johnson ‘Didn’t Believe’ in Brexit

LONDON — David Cameron, the British prime minister who called the Brexit referendum, says in a new memoir that Boris Johnson, Britain’s leader now, embraced withdrawing from the European Union only when he sensed it would be politically advantageous. “He risked an outcome he didn’t believe in because it would help his political career,” Mr. […]

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Margaret Atwood’s Dystopia, and Ours

After Donald Trump’s election, sales of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Margaret Atwood’s canonical 1985 novel of theocratic totalitarianism, spiked, along with other dystopian classics like George Orwell’s “1984.” Atwood’s book takes place in a world where a clique of Christian fundamentalists have overthrown the United States government and instituted the rigidly patriarchal Republic of Gilead. Environmental […]

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The Meritocrat Who Wants to Unwind the Meritocracy

NEW HAVEN — In 2015, the graduating class at Yale Law School, as custom has it, elected one of its professors to give the commencement address. And when the day came, the speaker, Daniel Markovits, got onstage and told the students, more or less, that their lives were ruined. “For your entire lives, you have […]

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In Edward Snowden’s New Memoir, the Disclosures This Time Are Personal

Revealing state secrets is hard, but revealing yourself in a memoir might be harder. As Edward Snowden puts it in the preface of “Permanent Record”: “The decision to come forward with evidence of government wrongdoing was easier for me to make than the decision, here, to give an account of my life.” Snowden, of course, […]

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