Tag: Books and Literature

Two Brilliant Siblings and the Curious Consolations of Math

At the 1994 reception for the prestigious Kyoto Prize, awarded for achievements that contribute to humanity, the French mathematician André Weil turned to his fellow honoree, the film director Akira Kurosawa, and said: “I have a great advantage over you. I can love and admire your work, but you cannot love and admire my work.” […]

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Andrea Camilleri, Author of Inspector Montalbano Novels, Dies at 93

Andrea Camilleri, who took a late-career stab at writing a mystery novel and came up with the Inspector Montalbano detective books, which became wildly successful in Italy and were the basis for a popular television series, died on Wednesday morning in a hospital in Rome. He was 93. A spokeswoman for the hospital, the Santo […]

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Michael Seidenberg, Who Ran a Not-So-Secret Bookstore, Dies at 64

Michael Seidenberg, whose clandestine bookshop and literary salon on the Upper East Side was much loved by bibliophiles, literati and inveterate browsers, died on July 8 in a hospital in Danbury, Conn. He was 64. His wife, Nicky Roe, said the cause was heart failure. Mr. Seidenberg, who lived in Manhattan and in Kent, N.Y., […]

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In ‘The Nickel Boys,’ Colson Whitehead Depicts a Real-Life House of Horrors

THE NICKEL BOYSBy Colson Whitehead Though the story had been hiding in plain sight for decades, it was not until 2014 that Colson Whitehead stumbled upon the inspiration for his haunted and haunting new novel, “The Nickel Boys.” As he explains in his acknowledgments, he learned through The Tampa Bay Times about archaeology students at […]

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Summer Reads, Recommended by Women of The New York Times

You’re reading In Her Words, where women rule the headlines. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox. Let me know what you think at dearmaya@nytimes.com. “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.” — Anna Quindlen, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning […]

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Buying Lattes Is Not Keeping You From Being Rich

“I Will Teach You to Be Rich” didn’t get as much attention as it deserved when it was first published a decade ago, and it’s easy to understand why. The author, Ramit Sethi, who runs a website with the same name as his book, ignored the emotions people have about money, apparently believing that all […]

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Beware the Writer as Houseguest

Consider the writer as houseguest. Is it a good idea to invite someone into your home whose occupation it is to observe everything? The writer as host might be no better. Even the most thoughtful guest will undoubtedly interfere with the writer’s productivity during the visit. It’s really no surprise that people who write for […]

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He’s Writing 365 Children’s Books in 365 Days, While Holding Down a Day Job

EAGLEHAWK NECK, Tasmania — By the time Matt Zurbo plopped on the couch to write his 282nd children’s book, he’d worked all day at an oyster farm, laughed with his daughter on the beach, gone for a swim in the frigid waves and cooked a vegetarian feast. It was just after 10 p.m., and his […]

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In ‘The Nickel Boys,’ Colson Whitehead Continues to Make a Classic American Genre His Own

“The dirt looked wrong.” A college student noticed it first: a sunken patch in a field, near a shuttered juvenile reformatory school. When the scrub was cleared away, and the broken glass, those who were digging hit bone. The skeletons of more than 50 boys were unearthed, rib cages blasted by buckshot. This is the […]

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A Reckoning With the Wars He Has Known

PLACES AND NAMESOn War, Revolution, and ReturningBy Elliot Ackerman A decade after leading a platoon through the battle of Falluja in 2004, when Iraq gave American troops their most intense urban combat since Vietnam, Elliot Ackerman found himself knocking around the edges of another war. “What I see is Syria,” he writes in his spare, […]

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Text on the Beach: Great Summer Reads

Last summer, I made it to the beach only once — to Asbury Park, N.J., for a day trip with my son. Nevertheless, between Memorial Day and Labor Day, I plowed through a dozen novels, many of which could be described as “beach books.” Now, before I take these words out of quotation marks, and […]

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‘American Carnage’ Shows How War Between Republicans Led to Their Peace With Trump

Over the weekend we learned that President Trump — who has taken credit for an economic turnaround that began under Barack Obama and a hot streak by the Boston Red Sox — insists that he predicted the meteoric rise of Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez long before anyone else did. He says that he called her “Evita,” […]

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To Save Her Abducted Daughter, This Heroine Has to Kidnap a New Victim

It took four countries, three continents, a couple of careers, philosophy studies at Oxford, serious writing awards and major gonna-make-you-a-star-kid machinations in several fields of endeavor to yield this opening sentence from Adrian McKinty: “She’s sitting at the bus stop checking the likes on her Instagram feed and doesn’t even notice the man with the […]

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