Tag: Books and Literature

Holocaust Educators Urge Amazon to Stop Selling Nazi Propaganda

Two organizations that educate the public about the Holocaust are calling on Amazon to stop selling Nazi propaganda, rekindling a debate over what should be sold through the world’s biggest digital marketplace. The Holocaust Educational Trust, which trains students and teachers across Britain, posted a letter on Twitter on Friday calling on Amazon U.K. to […]

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A Billion-Dollar Scandal Turns the ‘King of Manuscripts’ Into the ‘Madoff of France’

PARIS — A letter from Frida Kahlo, signed and twice kissed with red lipstick, fetched just over $8,800. A page of scribbled calculations by Isaac Newton sold for about $21,000. A 1953 handwritten speech by John F. Kennedy took in $10,000. “Adjugé!” said a gray-haired auctioneer, over and over, as he gaveled away nearly every one […]

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This Spring’s Most Anticipated New Books, in Pictures

Image Writers & LoversA novel by Lily King And the toasts reveal everything: the rancor between the two families, the promiscuity, the unrequited loves, the bad behavior, the last-minute confessions — all delivered in drunken tangents that end with saccharine platitudes. Having eschewed a more certain path in favor of the writing life, a 31-year-old […]

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‘Emma’ Review: Back on the Manor, but Still Clueless

Your first instinct while watching “Emma” may be to lick the screen (or perhaps blanch). This latest adaptation of Jane Austen has been candied up with the sort of palette you see in certain old-fashioned confectionaries and in fussy Georgian-era restorations. With a rosy blush in her cheeks, her satiny ribbons and bows, Emma (Anya […]

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France Gets Its Weinstein Moment

PARIS — France has spent the last two years or so waiting for its Harvey Weinstein moment: a big trial, the fall of someone powerful, a viscerally indignant country. The conversation around #MeToo in France has been undeniably intense. But when Frenchwomen have spoken up against film directors (Luc Besson, Roman Polanski) and intellectuals (Tariq […]

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Why Tales of Female Trios Are Newly Relevant

AS A GIRL of 6 or 8 or 10, I spent the long Midwestern summers and longer winters reading the sort of books one typically gave to American girls in the mid-1980s, many of which featured trios of female characters: the frontier Ingalls sisters of “Little House on the Prairie” (1935); Nancy Drew and her […]

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Colum McCann’s New Novel Makes a Good-Intentioned Collage Out of Real Tragedy

Colum McCann’s new novel, “Apeirogon,” is based on an uplifting true story. It’s about two fathers — Rami Elhanan, an Israeli, and Bassam Aramin, a Palestinian — who each lost a young daughter to senseless violence. They have become friends and work together, through an organization called Combatants for Peace, to bring the opposing sides […]

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Julian Barnes, Playing Against Character, Writes About a Character of Action and Appetite

The trouble with Picasso, Julian Barnes wrote, reprovingly, in his essay collection, “Keeping an Eye Open,” is that he didn’t make paintings — he made Picassos. It could be Barnes’s aversion to self-parody — to producing a “Barnes” — that has driven his frenetically various career. He has written a cubist biography of Flaubert; a […]

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Her Blog Post About Uber Upended Big Tech. Now She’s Written a Memoir.

WHISTLEBLOWERMy Journey to Silicon Valley and Fight for Justice at UberBy Susan Fowler In December 2015, Susan Fowler was settling into a new job as a software engineer at the technology-transportation company Uber when her boss sent her a series of disturbing chat messages. After asking how her work was going, Fowler’s manager, “Jake,” began […]

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How an Author and His Husband Host Casual Dinners in Their New York Apartment

It’s tempting to call the author Richie Jackson’s new book, “Gay Like Me,” a memoir or an epistolary — but it’s really a manifesto, a 156-page letter from a gay 54-year-old father to his gay 19-year-old son, Jackson Wong, about what it meant to be gay when the writer was young in New York and […]

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His Son Hiked Into the Costa Rican Jungle, and Never Came Out. What Happened?

THE ADVENTURER’S SONA MemoirBy Roman Dial Years ago, I brought a city friend hiking. We had to cross a river of snowmelt on a cold, rainy day, and though the water normally stayed shallow, it was deeper and faster than I’d ever seen it. I crossed first, testing the depth; I showed my friend how […]

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Jeremy O. Harris: Brandon Taylor ‘Subjugates Us With the Deft Hand of a Dom’

REAL LIFE By Brandon Taylor Wallace’s father died several weeks ago, but more pressingly so did the collection of nematodes he has been diligently studying all summer in an unnamed university in an unnamed Midwestern town. Like I was quite recently, and like the novelist Brandon Taylor was once himself, Wallace is a black gay […]

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Charles Portis, Elusive Author of ‘True Grit,’ Dies at 86

Charles Portis, the publicity-shy author of “True Grit” and a short list of other novels that drew a cult following and accolades as the work of possibly the nation’s best unknown writer, died on Monday at a hospice in Little Rock, Ark. He was 86. His death was confirmed by his brother Jonathan, who said […]

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An Undocumented Immigrant Has Information About a Murder. What to Do?

AMNESTYBy Aravind Adiga Halfway through “Amnesty,” Aravind Adiga’s relentless new novel, there is a Coca-Cola sign, standing “like a referee” between the red-light district and the Darlinghurst suburb in Sydney, Australia. If Danny — born Dhananjaya Rajaratnam: an undocumented immigrant from Sri Lanka, house cleaner, a man trying to reinvent himself in a hostile world […]

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Addiction Memoirs Are a Genre in Recovery

A national opioid epidemic. Legal marijuana. Continual attempts to redefine problem drinking. Is it any wonder that the addiction memoir (made modish in the 1940s and 1950s by Charles Jackson’s thinly veiled roman à clef, “The Lost Weekend,” and “Junky,” by William S. Burroughs; revived in the 1990s and 2000s with “Permanent Midnight,” by Jerry […]

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How Colum McCann Shaped Loss Into a Book

“I’m a bit of a magpie,” Colum McCann said, sheepishly gesturing around his office at Hunter College. He has taught creative writing there for 13 years, and in that time has appointed his space with plenty of mementos: old family photographs, a self-portrait his daughter drew in neon crayon, a framed poster of what he […]

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Just a Few Billion Years Left to Go

UNTIL THE END OF TIME Mind, Matter, and Our Search for Meaning in an Evolving UniverseBy Brian Greene “In the fullness of time all that lives will die.” With this bleak truth Brian Greene, a physicist and mathematician at Columbia University, the author of best-selling books like “The Elegant Universe” and co-founder of the yearly […]

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Barbara Remington, Illustrator of Tolkien Book Covers, Dies at 90

Barbara Remington, the illustrator who created the most widely recognized covers for J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy and “The Hobbit” — which she quickly executed before she even had the chance to read the books — died on Jan. 23 in Susquehanna, Pa. She was 90. Her longtime friend John Bromberg said […]

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A Scholar of Democracy Gets a 2020 Lab for His Ideas

WASHINGTON — American democracy has been thoroughly eulogized in recent years, written of with grief and nostalgia in numerous best-selling books. Law professor Ganesh Sitaraman has also taken up the subject, but his has a more aspirational title: “The Great Democracy.” “I’m particularly excited to talk about this book because I’ve been thinking about it […]

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A History of Seduction

Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play Music | How to Listen In his new book, “Seduction: A History From the Enlightenment to the Present,” Clement Knox takes us through the lives of memorable seducers and shows how the art of seduction has influenced politics and power, literature and social movements. “One half of the history of […]

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An Adulterer, a Gang Member, a Dystopian Teacher: 3 Novels of American Womanhood

HOME MAKINGBy Lee Matalone194 pp. HarperPerennial/HarperCollins. Paper, $15.99. Image “Home making” is a phrase so fraught with political and social overtones that before opening this book I went to Google for a sterile definition: “The creation and management of a home, especially as a pleasant place in which to live.” This two-part framework is helpful. […]

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