Tag: Black people

Hector Lopez, Who Broke a Baseball Color Barrier, Dies at 93

Hector Lopez, the first Black manager at the highest level of minor league baseball and one of the last living members of the early 1960s Yankees dynasty, playing outfield alongside Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris, died on Thursday. He was 93. His death was confirmed by his son Darrol Lopez, who said he died of […]

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Black People And Seasonal Depression: How To Combat Seasonal Affective Disorder

NewsOne Featured Video Source: Tempura / Getty The summer is over and as the seasons change from fall to winter, so can our moods.  Shorter days mean less time to enjoy the sunlight and lower temperatures can keep us cooped up in the house for longer periods.  These shifts in the seasons can have drastic […]

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In a Reversal, NYC Tightens Admissions to Some Top Schools

New York City’s selective middle schools can once again use grades to choose which students to admit, the school chancellor, David C. Banks, announced on Thursday, rolling back a pandemic-era moratorium that had opened the doors of some of the city’s most elite schools to more low-income students. Selective high schools will also be able […]

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Ron DeSantis’s Race Problem

In July, Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida appointed Jeffery Moore, a former tax law specialist with the Florida Department of Revenue, to be a county commissioner in Gadsden, the blackest county in the state. On Friday, Moore resigned after a picture emerged that appeared to show him dressed in Ku Klux Klan regalia. Neither Moore […]

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NYC Tests Show Children Gained in Reading, but Lost Ground in Math

In the first sign of how New York City public schoolchildren fared during the pandemic, new test score data released Wednesday showed sharp declines in math but steady performance in reading for students in the nation’s largest school system. The results of the state’s standardized exams highlighted the uneven effects of the past two and […]

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Hurricanes ‘Disproportionately’ Harm Black Neighborhoods–It’s Because Of Environmental Racism

NewsOne Featured Video Source: Bloomberg / Getty Floridians are preparing for the worst as Hurricane Ian continues its destructive path.   The National Hurricane Center has reported that around 9 a.m. the center of Ian was located about 85 miles south-southwest of Orlando and moving at about 10mph. With sustained winds up to 155mph and storm […]

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Wendell Pierce Steps Into ‘Death of a Salesman’

“His Willy is so lovable,” she said in a recent interview. “He will make you laugh, he will make you feel joyous, which makes the heartbreak at the end all the more deep and all the more resonant.” Rendering the Loman family as Black aggravates that heartbreak. As Cromwell explained it, the play remains the […]

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Whoopi Goldberg Will Not Shut Up Thank You Very Much

To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. On a recent summer afternoon, Whoopi Goldberg led me to her backyard so I could see her plants. Goldberg, a native New Yorker, lives in New Jersey, in a gated community previously inhabited by Thomas Edison and […]

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The Dazzling Life and Shocking Death of Cheslie Kryst

Dr. Drake said many Black women in the United States must “develop highly effective coping mechanisms against distress,” and mentioned a variety of psychological blows: “microaggressions, generational trauma, limited opportunities, being under threat economically, professionally, constantly.” Last year, Ms. Kryst penned an article for Allure magazine, titled, “A Pageant Queen Reflects on Turning 30.” She […]

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40% Of Black People ‘Definitely’ Want Electric Cars, But Where Can They Plug-In?

NewsOne Featured Video Source: George Rose / Getty Anationally representative survey of 8,027 Americans shows that across all racial demographics, overall interest in purchasing electric vehicles is high. Among those surveyed, 33% of white respondents, 38% of Black respondents, 43% of Latinos, and 52% of Asian Americans say they would “definitely” or “seriously consider” purchasing […]

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Former Texas Police Officer Acquitted in 2020 Shooting Death of Black Man

A white police officer who shot and killed a 31-year-old Black man in Texas two years ago and whose response was deemed “not objectively reasonable” by a preliminary investigation was acquitted of murder by a jury on Thursday. The officer, Shaun Lucas, shot the man, Jonathan Price, four times in the torso on Oct. 3, […]

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Black NFL Players Still Wear Their Hair in Locs Despite the Challenges

It wasn’t until his junior year of college, in 2015, that Aaron Jones decided to rebel and form his hair into dreadlocks. He said his parents, Alvin and Vurgess Jones, had warned him that Black people had long been targeted for discrimination, ostracism or punishment in school and the workplace for wearing their natural hair […]

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Let’s Talk About the Economic Roots of White Supremacy

In my Tuesday column on the political incentives within the Republican Party, I made an analogy to the struggle over civil rights in the midcentury Democratic Party. I brought up the Dixiecrats and mentioned their opposition to labor rights as well as civil rights. Let’s talk about that. Most Americans tend to think of Jim […]

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The Magnificent Poem Jars of David Drake, Center Stage at the Met

At the center of “Hear Me Now: The Black Potters of Old Edgefield, South Carolina,” a revelatory exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, stands a majestic artifact: a stoneware storage jar that may qualify as one of 19th-century America’s great sculptures. It measures over two feet high, with a slightly rippling surface layered with […]

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Jasmine Guillory Finds Her Happily-Ever-After as a Romance Writer

Jasmine Guillory likes H.E.A. As fans of romance novels know, H.E.A. stands for “happily ever after,” a guarantee that the protagonist will find her version of happiness. And probably sex, too. “Romance is a perfect thing to read when things are difficult,” said Ms. Guillory, 46, whose eighth novel was published on Tuesday. “Even if […]

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Mexico Has Tequila. Peru, Pisco. In Colombia, a Push for Viche, Now Legal.

CALI, Colombia — As a child, Lucía Solís watched her family bury a stash of cherished but prohibited cane sugar liquor, called viche, in the woods, fearful of police seizures and even arrest. Yet here she was this August surrounded by bottles of various types of viche, its liquid the color of amber or cream […]

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Apostle of Black Power

I am human. I, too, doubt and worry. I don’t know if I’m an apostle of Black power or a Don Quixote of it. And yet, I remain convinced of the theory I have proposed. Even without me advocating a reverse migration, it would be happening. In a report released this week by the Brookings […]

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At 75, the Father of Environmental Justice Meets the Moment

HOUSTON — He’s known as the father of environmental justice, but more than half a century ago he was just Bob Bullard from Elba, a flyspeck town deep in Alabama that didn’t pave roads, install sewers or put up streetlights in areas where Black families like his lived. His grandmother had a sixth grade education. […]

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As Harvard Makes Amends for Its Ties to Slavery, Descendants Ask, What Is Owed?

“It was astounding,” she said. “Who were these people, what happened to them?” For Ms. Wolff-Platt, the new information has meant reconsidering her past, and the forces that have subtly shaped her life. The Discovery Ms. Wolff-Platt first learned of her connection to enslaved people from James Shea, a former curator at Longfellow House, a […]

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A Journey Through Black Nova Scotia

An undated photograph of Africville.Credit…Library and Archives Canada Similar to the urban renewal policies of the 1950s and 60s in American cities, Halifax decided to relocate the residents of Africville in order to build commercial and industrial districts in the area. In 1964, the Halifax City Council voted to authorize the relocation of residents, though […]

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The Killing of Eliza Fletcher Is a Tragedy, Not a Morality Play

I’m not saying these aren’t worthy subjects for public consideration. Memphis, like many cities, has a problem with violent crime. Five days after Ms. Fletcher’s abduction, another Memphis man went on a shooting rampage, killing four people and wounding three more, at least part of which he livestreamed on Facebook. But the reaction online to […]

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Democrats’ Black Male Voter Problem

Last month in a videotaped appearance for a “Pod Save America” live show, Stacey Abrams, a celebrated Democratic activist and the Democratic nominee for governor of Georgia, said that Black men have the power to determine the election in that state. After explaining that some Black men chose not to vote because “often the leadership […]

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For Florida A&M, Getting on the Field Is Just One of Many Problems

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Here’s what comes with being a football player at Florida A&M: getting booted from the dorms during training camp and sleeping in your car. Bad or uncertain advice from an overwhelmed staff about what classes to sign up for. Monthslong waits for the scholarship check that covers your meals and rent. And, […]

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The Women of ‘Wakanda Forever,’ the ‘Black Panther’ Sequel

When Marvel released the trailer for the sequel “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” in July, it garnered 172 million views in its first 24 hours. That was nearly double the viewership of the original “Black Panther” teaser in 2017. In the intervening years, much had changed. The first one, directed by Ryan Coogler, smashed not only […]

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A Great Podcast, a Worthy Memoir and a Curdled Take on Clarence Thomas

I spent the summer away from New York City and this week am back into the swing of my real life. Already, I’ve been gobsmacked by things relating to the three topics I cover here the most. On music, I’ve had the opportunity to see 14-year-old Charles Kirsch carry off M.C.-ing a cabaret show that […]

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Two Barbers, a YouTube Channel and the Truth About Race at the Racetrack

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. — Rasi Harper and Maurice Davis arrived in Louisville a couple of days before the Kentucky Derby in May, carrying their video cameras and searching, as always, for true stories of life at the racetrack. They found one in a hurry. At one of the first barns they visited at Churchill Downs, […]

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The Audacity of Big Foe

Frances Tiafoe has everything needed to be a difference maker in tennis. The swag. Calm and confident, Tiafoe danced off the court following his quarterfinal win on Wednesday, bathing in the roars from a packed crowd at Arthur Ashe Stadium. The strokes. Propulsive forehands and backhands. Easy, 135-mile-per-hour aces. Volleys with McEnroe-esque touch. The back […]

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Oberlin Says It Will Pay $36.59 Million to a Local Bakery

Oberlin College, known as a bastion of progressive politics, said on Thursday that it would pay $36.59 million to a local bakery that said it had been defamed and falsely accused of racism after a worker caught a Black student shoplifting. That 2016 dispute with Gibson’s Bakery resulted in a yearslong legal fight and resonated […]

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Bernard Shaw, CNN’s Lead Anchor for 20 Years, Dies at 82

Bernard Shaw, CNN’s lead prime-time anchor for 20 years, who was also known for his steely coverage from Tiananmen Square in Beijing during the Chinese government’s crackdown on protesters in 1989 and from Baghdad at the start of the Persian Gulf war two years later, died on Wednesday. He was 82. The death, at a […]

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