Tag: black people

Black and Latino Voters Are Looking for ‘More Than Just Some Token Words’

LAS VEGAS — Kristina Alvarez, a 36-year-old medical aide in Las Vegas, knows how badly the Democrats want her attention and ideally her vote. So does JA Moore, 34, a state representative in Charleston, S.C., whose endorsement was highly sought after. The people being wooed most aggressively by Democratic candidates at the moment — Latino […]

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What Nevada Wants in a President

LAS VEGAS — No Democratic candidate for president can win the nomination without the overwhelming support of voters of color, and Nevada — with its nearly 30 percent Latino, 10 percent African-American, and about 9.5 percent Asian-American and Pacific Islander population — is the first contest to offer insight into which of the remaining all-white […]

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Why a Black Girl Might Want to Shrink

When I was in high school, I had an eating disorder, and nobody noticed. Sure, I’d always been skinny, so perhaps my weight loss was undetectable at first. Occasionally some shrewd person would pile more food on my plate after taking note of how little I’d served myself. But I could mostly avoid scrutiny by […]

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What It Means to Be Black in America

‘While I Yet Live’ By Maris Curran Gee’s Bend is a rural community in lower Alabama that is widely recognized for its extraordinary quilts. The quilts reflect a collective history and a deep sense of place. And they register the bold individual voices of the women who made them. Video transcript Back 0:00/14:26 transcript While […]

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I Was the Judge in the Stop-and-Frisk Case. I Don’t Think Bloomberg Is Racist.

In 2013, I ruled in Floyd vs. City of New York that the tactics underlying the city’s stop-and-frisk program violated the constitutional rights of people of color. While Michael Bloomberg was mayor of New York, black and Latino people were disproportionately stopped, and often frisked, millions of times, peaking at 690,000 in 2011. After my […]

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When Did Bloomberg Turn Against Stop-and-Frisk? When He Ran for President.

Days before he announced his presidential campaign in November, Michael R. Bloomberg, the mayor of New York City from 2002 through 2013, renounced one of his signature policies: stop-and-frisk, in which police officers stopped and searched millions of New Yorkers, the vast majority of whom were black or Hispanic and had not committed a crime. […]

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New York Times Leads Polk Winners With Four Awards

The New York Times on Wednesday received four George Polk Awards, the most of any news organization, including one for The 1619 Project, a series from The Times Magazine centered on reframing United States history by focusing on the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans. Long Island University, the institutional home of […]

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After Fighting Nazis, Black G.I.s Faced Racism in U.S. Military

In commemoration of Black History Month, the latest article from “Beyond the World War II We Know,” a series by The Times that documents lesser-known stories from World War II, focuses on the challenges of black troops stationed in Germany in the aftermath of the war. When Walter White, the head of the N.A.A.C.P. from […]

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The Case for a More Negative Black History Month

Black History Month is traditionally a time to honor black Americans and, theoretically, accord them their proper place in American history. Every February we re-examine the exemplary lives of Harriet Tubman, Charles Drew, Frederick Douglass and those of lesser known but truly significant leaders, artists, scientists, thinkers and others. The occasion has always felt too […]

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A Hometown Exhibition Will Showcase August Wilson’s Process

Great playwrights are often eclipsed by their work and the actors who give voice to it, but a coming exhibition dedicated to August Wilson will focus on the man behind the words. The August Wilson African American Cultural Center in Pittsburgh announced on Tuesday that this fall it would open “August Wilson: A Writer’s Landscape,” […]

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‘Good Times’ Actress Ja’Net DuBois Dies

Ja’Net DuBois, the actress who played the sassy Willona Woods in the 1970s TV show “Good Times” and sang the theme song to “The Jeffersons,” died on Monday. Ms. DuBois died in her sleep at her home in Glendale, Calif., surrounded by family, her youngest daughter, Kesha Gupta-Fields, said on Tuesday. “Good Times” was one […]

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The Trumpian Liberalism of Michael Bloomberg

Donald Trump is who he is as a politician because of his unapologetically racial vision of the American nation. Trump’s America is white, and he sees his job as protecting that whiteness from black and brown people who might come to the country or claim greater status within it. That’s what it meant to “make […]

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Boris Johnson Aide Quits After Furor Over Racial Comments

LONDON — The warning signs may have been there last month when Dominic Cummings, the influential and iconoclastic aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain, invited “weirdos and misfits” to apply to work at Downing Street. On Monday, one new recruit was at the center of a furor over his past assertions that blacks […]

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No, This Isn’t Biden’s Fault

More than four years ago, in the run-up to the 2016 presidential campaign, many progressives were hoping Elizabeth Warren would run. Only after she passed on the race — evidently deciding that Hillary Clinton was too strong to be beaten — did a less prominent progressive enter: Bernie Sanders. Last year, a different version of […]

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Harriet Tubman on a Debit Card: A Tribute or a Gaffe?

Harriet Tubman was to be commemorated by appearing on the $20 bill in a design that would have been unveiled this year, but the treasury secretary said in May that plans for the bill would be delayed until after President Trump left office. Enter OneUnited Bank, which this month revealed it was honoring the abolitionist […]

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Officer Pointed Gun at Black College Student’s Head, Lawsuit Says

Jaylan Butler and his Eastern Illinois University swim teammates were returning from a championship tournament last year in Sioux Falls, S.D., when their bus driver pulled off Interstate 80 near a rest stop in East Moline, Ill. It was shortly after 8 p.m. and Mr. Butler, 19, got out of the bus, which was headed […]

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The Equality That Wasn’t Enough

Shortly after acquitting President Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, Senate Republicans moved to confirm two nominees for the federal judiciary. The first, 38-year-old Andrew Brasher, was elevated from a Federal District Court in Alabama to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit. The second, Cory Wilson, is a 49-year-old […]

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When Multiracial Democracy First Seemed Possible

A few days ago, 300 people gathered in the Old State Capitol in Jackson, Miss., to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the election of Hiram Revels as the nation’s first African-American member of Congress. As nearly everyone knows, in the nation’s more than two centuries of existence Barack Obama is our only black president. Less […]

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How Rashad Robinson, Racial Justice Activist, Spends His Sundays

Rashad Robinson is the president of Color of Change, a racial justice organization. Lately, he has been busy interviewing Democratic presidential candidates — Bernie Sanders on “Medicare for all,” Pete Buttigieg on criminal justice reform and Elizabeth Warren on corporate accountability, for instance — for Color of Change’s podcast, “Voting While Black.” When he’s not […]

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‘In Italy I Kept Meeting Guys’: The Black Women Who Travel for Love

Italy, a country known for its language of love and for its men who publicly shower overtures on women like a centuries-old art form, is often associated with romantic encounters of the kind portrayed in the movies, from “Roman Holiday” to “The Lizzie McGuire Movie.” So some black women ask, why shouldn’t it be the […]

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Toppled but Not Gone: U.N.C. Grapples Anew With the Fate of Silent Sam

The question of what to do with Silent Sam — the Confederate statue that was toppled by protesters at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in August 2018 — just won’t go away. The university thought it had found an answer in November when it reached an agreement to give the statue to […]

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