Tag: Black people

​Tennessee Drag Law Sows Fear Among Performers Ahead of Pride Month

Renae Green-Bean had started taking precautions in public even before the Tennessee legislature approved a law in March limiting where “adult cabaret” can be performed. Ms. Green-Bean had watched the uptick in legislation restricting L.G.B.T.Q. rights and worried that restaurant nights with her wife, children or grandchildren, or her preference for masculine attire and closely […]

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Maternity’s Most Dangerous Time: After New Mothers Come Home

Sherri Willis-Prater’s baby boy was 2 months old, and she was about to return to her job at a school cafeteria in Chicago. But as she walked up the short flight of stairs to her kitchen one evening, she nearly collapsed, gasping for breath. At the hospital, Ms. Willis-Prater, who was 42 at the time, […]

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Reparations Are a Financial Quandary. For Democrats, They’re a Political One, Too.

What should Americans pay for the legacy of slavery and a century of Jim Crow segregation? For decades, the question was mostly academic. Then it was seized on by Democrats and activists during a time of racial re-examination after the murder of George Floyd in 2020, and a number of cities and states set up commissions […]

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How Greenwood, Tulsa’s ‘Black Wall Street’, Grew a Thriving Economy

When W.E.B. Du Bois visited the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Okla., in early 1921, he, like so many others, was impressed by what he found. The famed intellectual had been on the road for weeks on a Southern lecture tour. In his travel diary, he wrote of brutal lynchings and brutalization that were as old […]

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How Greenwood, Tulsa’s ‘Black Wall Street’, Grew a Thriving Economy

When W.E.B. Du Bois visited the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Okla., in early 1921, he, like so many others, was impressed by what he found. The famed intellectual had been on the road for weeks on a Southern lecture tour. In his travel diary, he wrote of brutal lynchings and brutalization that were as old […]

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The Elusive Quest for Black Progress in the U.S.

Life expectancy is one of the oldest and surest indicators we have of both human suffering and human progress. Wars, famines, the 1918 flu, vaccines, pasteurization, rising crop yields — so many events over time are encoded in the line of life expectancy, but its overall astonishing ascent is among the best cases for 20th-century […]

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The Elusive Quest for Black Progress in the U.S.

Life expectancy is one of the oldest and surest indicators we have of both human suffering and human progress. Wars, famines, the 1918 flu, vaccines, pasteurization, rising crop yields — so many events over time are encoded in the line of life expectancy, but its overall astonishing ascent is among the best cases for 20th-century […]

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Three Years After a Fateful Day in Central Park, Birding Continues to Change My Life

Birding, however, offers things those other passions do not. It’s accessible. No matter where you are around the globe or what kind of environment you’re in — city, suburb, country, mountains, woodland, field, swamp, shore or sea — the presence and variety of birds are astonishing. With birds, no matter the time of year, there’s […]

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She Said She Was Fired for Being a Black Woman. A Jury Agreed.

Between 2018 and 2019, Röbynn Europe, a former professional body builder, worked at an Equinox on the Upper East Side, where she managed personal trainers. Years earlier, as a scholarship student at Brearley, the girls’ school several blocks away, where she began in seventh grade, commuting first from Canarsie and then Coney Island, she had […]

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The Americans Who Most Need a Greener Future May Get a Dirtier One

If the United States can figure out how to quickly build more clean energy, places like Port Arthur, Texas, and Lake Charles, Louisiana, may have the most to gain. These communities have for decades shouldered a disproportionate burden of fossil fuel pollution and residents paid dearly with their health. With fewer oil, gas and petrochemical […]

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Reflections on Stephen L. Carter’s 1991 Book, ‘Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby’

In 1991, Stephen L. Carter, a professor at Yale Law School, began his book “Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby” with a discomfiting anecdote. A fellow professor had criticized one of Carter’s papers because it “showed a lack of sensitivity to the experience of Black people in America.” When the professor, who was white, learned […]

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Highways Have Sliced Through City After City. Can the U.S. Undo the Damage?

Anthony Roberts set out to walk to a convenience store on the opposite side of a busy highway in Kansas City, Mo., one afternoon. It wasn’t an easy trip. First, he had to detour out of his way to reach an intersection. Then he had to wait for the light to change. When the walk […]

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Biden to Nominate Gen. Charles Q. Brown to Be Joint Chiefs Chairman

WASHINGTON — President Biden intends to nominate Gen. Charles Q. Brown, the Air Force chief of staff, on Thursday to become the country’s most senior military officer, formalizing what had been one of the worst kept secrets in Washington. If confirmed by the Senate, General Brown would be only the second Black man, after Colin […]

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Elite Virginia High School’s Admissions Policy Does Not Discriminate, Court Rules

Why It Matters: The case could be a test of “race neutral” admissions policies. The Supreme Court is expected to rule soon on race-conscious affirmative action in college admissions, but the Thomas Jefferson case could break new ground. The high school’s new admissions criterion never even mentions race, but the lawsuit challenges the use of […]

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The Good News on Unemployment for Black Americans

In a recent article that stressed America’s impressive recovery from the Covid economic slump, I compared current conditions with those in late 1988, when George H.W. Bush won an electoral landslide in part because of the perception that the economy was in great shape. As I noted, inflation at the time was roughly what it […]

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The First 10 Words of the African American English Dictionary Are In

In a recent online presentation, editors and researchers working on a first-of-its-kind dictionary of African American English gave a status update on the project. As academics explained their various methodologies, slides displayed behind them showed words that are more often associated with Twitter than Oxford: “Bussin,” virtual attendees were told, means impressive or tasty, while […]

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The Last-Known ‘Colored’ School in Manhattan Will Become a Landmark

For years, New York City Department of Sanitation workers ate their lunch in a three-story yellow brick building on West 17th Street in Chelsea without knowing about its history: It was once a “colored” school that served Black Americans during racial segregation in New York City public schools. On Tuesday, the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission […]

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Do New York’s Affordable Housing Lotteries Fuel Segregation?

For decades, affordable housing in New York City has followed a seemingly simple rule: To make new development more palatable, half of new affordable apartments must first be offered to people already living in the area. The policy, put in place in 1988 by Mayor Ed Koch, was designed to benefit low-income communities. It has […]

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Tim Scott Announces Presidential Campaign, Adding to Trump Challengers

Tim Scott, the first Black Republican elected to the Senate from the South since Reconstruction, announced his campaign for president on Monday, adding to a growing number of Republicans running as alternatives to former President Donald J. Trump. Mr. Scott’s decision, which followed a soft rollout in February and the creation of an exploratory committee […]

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Google’s Photo App Still Can’t Find Gorillas. And Neither Can Apple’s.

Credit…Desiree Rios/The New York Times Eight years after a controversy over Black people being mislabeled by image analysis software — and despite big advances in computer vision — the tech giants still fear repeating the mistake. May 22, 2023 When Google released its stand-alone Photos app in May 2015, people were wowed by what it […]

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NAACP Issues Travel Advisory for Florida in Response to DeSantis DEI Bill

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People on Saturday issued a travel advisory for Florida, saying that under Gov. Ron DeSantis the state has become “openly hostile toward African Americans, people of color and L.G.B.T.Q.+ individuals.” The N.A.A.C.P. joins the League of United Latin American Citizens, a civil rights organization that issued a […]

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Jim Brown Should Be Seen Fully, Flaws and All

For all his athletic prowess, all the heft he brought to his social activism, Jim Brown’s power sprang from his unyielding resistance to the narrow definitions imposed by American society on its Black citizens and, in his case, Black male athletes. The resounding power of no. That is what Jim Brown embodied. Brown, who died […]

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Jim Brown Set Records With the Cleveland Browns Then Left on Top

A few days before Super Bowl X in 1976, some of the N.F.L.’s biggest stars mingled at a private party at a nightclub in Miami. Chuck Foreman, then a fearsome running back with the Minnesota Vikings, remembered rubbing shoulders with some of the biggest stars of the time at the position, including Walter Payton and […]

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Jim Brown, Football Great and Civil Rights Champion, Dies at 87

Jim Brown, the Cleveland Browns fullback who was acclaimed as one of the greatest players in pro football history, and who remained in the public eye as a Hollywood action hero and a civil rights activist, though his name was later tarnished by accusations of violent conduct against women, died on Thursday night at his […]

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Jamaal Bowman Speaks Out on Marjorie Taylor Greene Spat

Many of his colleagues had already left for the night, but as Representative Jamaal Bowman, Democrat of New York, stepped out onto the Capitol steps on Wednesday, he had business left to do: heckling Republicans. “Have some dignity!” he yelled toward Representative George Santos, the New York freshman who is fighting federal fraud charges, and […]

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Tim Scott Is Set to Join 2024 Race, Already Flush With Campaign Cash

Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina will announce his candidacy for president on Monday and will enter the race with around $22 million cash on hand, making him one of the most serious competitors for the front-runner, Donald J. Trump, even as Mr. Scott has hovered around 2 percent in Republican primary polls. After announcing […]

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Tim Scott Is Set to Join 2024 Race, Already Flush With Campaign Cash

Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina will announce his candidacy for president on Monday and will enter the race with around $22 million cash on hand, making him one of the most serious competitors for the front-runner, Donald J. Trump, even as Mr. Scott has hovered around 2 percent in Republican primary polls. After announcing […]

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After Historic Primary in Philadelphia, a New Mayor Will Face Old Problems

PHILADELPHIA — The afternoon before Election Day, Jennifer Robinson, 41, was trying to manage her two small children in the quiet corner of a public library in a pocket of her city that had endured generations of abandonment. She was despondent about the state of Philadelphia, most of all about the crime, but she talked […]

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