Tag: Travel and Vacations

Japan to Fully Reopen in October, as Asian Holdouts Dwindle

TOKYO — Nearly two and a half years after it instituted some of the world’s tightest pandemic-related border controls, Japan said on Thursday that it would finally welcome back most tourists next month as it seeks to revitalize its once lucrative travel industry. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, who is in New York for the U.N. […]

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In Istanbul’s Private Retreats of the Sultans, Time Stands Still

Inside one of the elegant pavilions known in Istanbul as a kasir, the clamor and chaos of big city life recedes. The noise of car horns and shouting vendors is replaced by near silence. Listen carefully for the imagined whisper of silk rustling in the breeze or the echo of a once vital conversation abruptly […]

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Amtrak Halts Long-Distance Service Over Freight Rail Labor Dispute

Amtrak said Wednesday that it was canceling all long-distance passenger trains, effective Thursday, because of a possible work stoppage on freight railroads whose tracks Amtrak uses. The announcement was made as the rail freight industry and two key unions remained at an impasse in contract negotiations. A federally mandated 30-day “cooling off” period ends at […]

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Is Cold, Blustery Lake Superior a Perfect Cruise Destination?

It’s an August morning in northern Wisconsin, the kind that residents of the small town of Bayfield dream about in the darkest months of winter. The sun glistens on Lake Superior, a gentle north breeze cools the 70-degree air, and the City Dock, lined by sailboats and yachts, is quiet save for a small circle […]

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Woman Gets 4 Months After Shoving Flight Attendant, Spitting on a Passenger

A New York woman was sentenced to four months in federal prison after spitting on a passenger, then shoving a flight attendant on an American Airlines flight in February 2021, a year that saw a record number of incidents of unruly and violent behavior on airplanes. Kelly Pichardo, a 32-year-old single mother who lives in […]

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A Journey Through Black Nova Scotia

An undated photograph of Africville.Credit…Library and Archives Canada Similar to the urban renewal policies of the 1950s and 60s in American cities, Halifax decided to relocate the residents of Africville in order to build commercial and industrial districts in the area. In 1964, the Halifax City Council voted to authorize the relocation of residents, though […]

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Your Childhood Home Is in Front of You. Do You Go In?

It’s perhaps unsurprising, then, that Americans spend so much time writing, thinking and singing about our bygone places and our ever-elusive roots. Thomas Wolfe insisted that we can never really go home again. (In fairness, so did the — British — Moody Blues.) Bruce Springsteen not only sings “My Hometown” and “My Father’s House” but […]

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Filthy Plane Videos Ignite Debate About Airline Cleanliness

Early this year JetBlue stopped bringing in professional cleaning crews to clean tray tables between flights, something they started doing in the spring of 2020, according to a flight attendant. Similarly, by August 2020, Southwest said it had stopped disinfecting armrests and seatbelts between flights. Tidying up chips on the floor, of course, is different […]

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Finding Peace on a River Float in Texas

When Beyoncé — a Texan, by the way — released her “Renaissance” album this summer, she surprised fans and critics by not delivering heavy social commentary on the problems facing the country. Instead, she offered a nonstop flow of retro dance beats, explaining that the idea was “to feel free and adventurous in a time […]

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How One Couple Uprooted Their Life to Open an Inn in the Catskills

It’s Never Too Late is a series about people who decide to pursue their dreams on their own terms. In 2019, Maureen McNamara and her wife, Jennifer Stark, now both 60, took a leap of faith and decided to sell their popular restaurant, Amici’s Kitchen & Living Room, in the Detroit suburb of Berkley, Mich. […]

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Shakespeare or Bieber? This Canadian City Draws Devotees of Both

STRATFORD, Ontario — It’s a small city that practically shouts “Shakespeare!” Majestic white swans float in the Avon River, not far from Falstaff Street and Anne Hathaway Park, named for the playwright’s wife. Some residents live in Romeo Ward, while young students attend Hamlet elementary. And the school’s namesake play is often performed as part […]

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Tending to Grass, and to Grief, on a Tennis Court in Iowa

Mark Kuhn is hunched over, one knee on the ground, pulling dandelions from an otherwise immaculate lawn. With a small, serrated blade, he carefully carves tiny leaves from the turf, extracting as much of their roots as he can reach, and places them in a plastic container beside him. Dandelions, I learn, are as prolific […]

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New Titanic Footage Heralds Next Stage in Deep-Sea Tourism

New footage of the Titanic wreckage released last week by a commercial exploration company shows the doomed ship in vivid detail and highlighted that the world for wealthy tourists not only extends to space, but also the deep sea. The one-minute clip was shared by OceanGate Expeditions, a company that takes paying tourists in submersibles […]

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The End-of-Summer Child Care Crunch Is Here. I’m Not Amused.

According to Helms’s reporting, some counties simply defied the law in 2022, because educators want high schoolers in particular to have a more balanced school year, instead of a much shorter fall semester that ends after winter break. Starting earlier puts these high schools more in line with the community college schedule, which is important […]

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Pete Buttigieg Is Trying to Fix Air Travel With a ‘Dashboard.’ What’s on It?

On Thursday, the Department of Transportation unveiled its most concrete endeavor yet to fix air travel: an online dashboard featuring 10 U.S. airlines with green check marks next to the services they offer when flights are delayed or canceled for reasons within their control. The website, which is reminiscent of the sort of brand comparison […]

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Heat, Water, Fire: How Climate Change Is Transforming the Pacific Crest Trail

The already grueling 2,600-mile hike now includes the added challenges of global warming, which can mean a lack of shade and exposure to smoke and fire. Send any friend a story As a subscriber, you have 10 gift articles to give each month. Anyone can read what you share. Give this article By Rowan Moore […]

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Exploring Spain’s Arab Influence

There is a way through Spain that is all horseshoe arches, keyhole windows and bronze doors carved in Arabic script. It meanders into crenelated forts, Moorish castles overlooking the Mediterranean and grand mosques reconfigured by Christians into cathedrals. As the child of an Iraqi woman and a Swedish-American man, I have always been drawn to […]

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Low Water Levels Disrupt European River Cruises, a Favorite of U.S. Tourists

Mark Farmer’s two-week river cruise from Amsterdam to Budapest got off to a bad start. For the first four days, there were no luxurious dinners overlooking the Rhine River or views from the top-deck balcony room that he and his wife had booked. In fact, there was no boat at all. He and the other […]

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In ‘Little Venice,’ Cruise Ships and an Influx of Tourists

Authentic and a bit rough But Chioggiotti take great pride in being “veraci” — authentic and a bit rough — in contrast to Venetians’ sophistication. Each year, in early August, a local theater company presents Goldoni’s play “Baruffe Chiozzotte” in the streets, and tickets get sold out quickly. Venetians mock Chioggia, by calling the city […]

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At One of Canada’s Top Destinations, Tourists Are Back but Much Has Changed

A little over a year had passed since my last visits to the Alberta mountain towns of Banff and Canmore, and the contrast was startling. After a protracted pandemic-induced absence, tourists were back. An old and tricky problem was also back with a vengeance in Banff: too many cars. Even though the town introduced paid […]

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San Franciscans Are Done Apologizing for Their Cold Weather Summers

SAN FRANCISCO — While Americans from Seattle to Memphis to New York sweated their way through the swampy summer of 2022, here was the scene on an August afternoon at Fisherman’s Wharf, on the northern tip of San Francisco: Among a group of friends from Germany gawking at dozens of barking sea lions splayed on […]

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‌A Social Media Star of a Changed Middle East: An Arab From Israel in Dubai

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — All along the Dubai waterfront, Nuseir Yassin kept bumping into fans. An Egyptian tourist asked for a photograph. A yacht club manager from Zimbabwe stopped for a chat. A group of Filipinos gasped and called after him. “That’s him!” one shouted as Mr. Yassin hurtled home on a scooter. “See […]

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Making the Rounds on Nashville’s Singer-Songwriter Circuit

On a recent Sunday night in a Holiday Inn lounge on the fringe of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Paul Jefferson, a local songwriter with spiky hair and skinny jeans, took the stage to sing a couple of his better-known tunes, popularized in recordings by Keith Urban and Aaron Tippin. Between “You’re Not My God” and […]

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‘It’s My Tradition Too’: Oberammergau’s Centuries-Old Passion Play Evolves

OBERAMMERGAU, Germany — This is a town of wild-haired men. Their locks are scruffy, scraggly; tousled for the boys, and wispy for those whose boyhoods were long ago. There are beards, too, sported by those old enough to grow facial hair — generally ungroomed, and bushy. Once per decade, in fulfillment of a vow they […]

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‘It’s My Tradition Too’: Oberammergau’s Centuries-Old Passion Play Evolves

OBERAMMERGAU, Germany — This is a town of wild-haired men. Their locks are scruffy, scraggly; tousled for the boys, and wispy for those whose boyhoods were long ago. There are beards, too, sported by those old enough to grow facial hair — generally ungroomed, and bushy. Once per decade, in fulfillment of a vow they […]

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Aman Resorts Brings Serenity to Midtown Manhattan. Will It Work?

Over the last decade, a gilded collection of elite hotels near Central Park have vied for the distinction of being the most expensive in New York. Several, including the St. Regis, Carlyle and the Plaza, opened more than 80 years ago. Most, including the Baccarat, a relative newcomer, greet guests with sparkly chandeliers. This month, […]

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Europeans Debate Barring Russian Tourists Over the Invasion of Ukraine

BRUSSELS — A proposal that the European Union ban visas for all Russian tourists because of the Ukraine invasion has set off a debate in the continent’s capitals about morality, legality, collective guilt and the use of power. Already, some nations, like Estonia, are implementing their own bans, canceling some visas and refusing to allow […]

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