Tag: Holocaust and the Nazi Era

Overlooked No More: Else Ury’s Stories Survived World War II. She Did Not.

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Melissa Eddy BERLIN — What stood out was the thick, white “U” of her last name, which had been carefully painted on a brown leather suitcase that was loaded, along with the belongings of 1,190 […]

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Principal Who Tried to Stay ‘Politically Neutral’ About Holocaust Is Removed

A high school principal in Florida has been removed from his position over his refusal to state that the Holocaust was a factual historical event, saying that he had to stay “politically neutral” about the World War II-era genocide of six million Jews. “Not everyone believes the Holocaust happened,” the principal, William Latson of Spanish […]

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Eva Kor, Survivor of Twin Experiments at Auschwitz, Dies at 85

Eva Kor survived the sadistic pseudoscientific medical experiments carried out on twins at the Auschwitz death camp. She dedicated herself decades later to telling of the Holocaust horrors spawned by religious and racial hatred, while preaching the power of forgiveness as a means of healing from devastating trauma. Ms. Kor took young people on annual […]

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A Political Murder and Far-Right Terrorism: Germany’s New Hateful Reality

BERLIN — The death threats started in 2015, when Walter Lübcke defended the refugee policy of Chancellor Angela Merkel. A regional politician for her conservative party, he would go to small towns in his district and explain that welcoming those in need was a matter of German and Christian values. Hateful emails started pouring in. […]

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A Lauded Satirist of the Weimar Republic Who Anticipated the Brutality of the Third Reich

“Germany is an anatomical oddity,” Kurt Tucholsky once wrote. “It writes with its left hand and acts with its right.” He would have known. As the most prominent columnist of the Weimar Republic, he skewered the fashions and follies of the newly ascendant right wing in reams of satirical essays, poems and cabaret songs under […]

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It Depends on What You Mean by Fascism

On July 2, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, after a visit to migrant detention facilities run by Customs and Border Protection in Texas, claimed that the United States is “headed toward fascism.” Much of the response that followed was expected, but little or none of it examined the statement closely or detailed to what degree the United […]

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For Artist at Auschwitz, a Challenge: Stepping Into the Past, Not on It

OSWIECIM, Poland — The letter to Daniel Libeskind’s father arrived shortly after the war ended. His sister, Rozia, informed him that his family was dead. She was the only one of 10 siblings to survive Auschwitz. Over three handwritten pages in Yiddish, she detailed the horrors they endured. “As I write these words,” she concluded, […]

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Should We Call Detention Centers Concentration Camps?

Is it right to call the migrant detainment centers on our southern border “concentration camps,” as Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez did recently? Her comments were meant to evoke the Holocaust, and to call forth our indignation at our government’s mistreatment of refugees. But historical parallels should be drawn carefully; what’s happening in Clint, Tex., is not […]

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Dutch Railway Will Pay Millions to Holocaust Survivors

LONDON — At the height of World War II, the Dutch railway ran special trains to transit camps where Jews and other minorities awaited deportation to Nazi death camps. The trains were commissioned by Germany, which had invaded the Netherlands in 1940, ignoring a Dutch proclamation of neutrality, and the Dutch railway, Nederlandse Spoorwegen, complied. […]

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The Holocaust Survivor Who Deciphered Nazi Doublespeak

They didn’t wait for the war to end. In August 1944, as soon as Soviet troops swept the Nazis out of eastern Poland, a group of Jewish intellectuals rushed to cities like Lublin and Lodz to begin collecting and recording, scouring for any trace of the still fresh horror that had taken their own loved […]

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Ocasio-Cortez Calls Migrant Detention Centers ‘Concentration Camps,’ Eliciting Backlash

WASHINGTON — Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the liberal freshman Democrat from New York who has made fighting for immigrants’ rights a signature issue, on Tuesday described the Trump administration’s border detention facilities as “concentration camps,” provoking backlash from Republicans who said she was minimizing the Holocaust. “This administration has established concentration camps on the southern border […]

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Nazis Killed Her Father. Then She Fell in Love With One.

1. Such appalling events Emilie Landecker was 19 when she went to work for Benckiser, a German company that made industrial cleaning products and also took pride in cleansing its staff of non-Aryan elements. It was 1941. Ms. Landecker was half Jewish and terrified of deportation. Her new boss, Albert Reimann Jr., was an early […]

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The Battle for Europe, Part 1

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher The decades-long plan to stitch together countries and cultures into the European Union was ultimately blamed for two crises: mass migration and crippling debt. Together, those events contributed to a wave of nationalism across Europe. In […]

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Overlooked No More: Alan Turing, Condemned Code Breaker and Computer Visionary

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. This month we’re adding the stories of important L.G.B.T.Q. figures. By Alan Cowell LONDON — His genius embraced the first visions of modern computing and produced seminal insights into what became known as “artificial intelligence.” As […]

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The Fading Chords of Memory of D-Day

At each year’s commemorations of D-Day, there will be a dwindling number of survivors like 95-year-old Harry Read and 94-year-old John Hutton, former British paratroopers who jumped with the British Parachute Regiment team on Wednesday to land in Sannerville, France, as they had 75 years ago. A battle so momentous for the course of history, […]

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For France, a D-Day Ceremony Laced With Paradox

PARIS — President Trump will spend a few hours this week in Normandy, where, 75 years ago on June 6, in Ronald Reagan’s memorable words, “The Allies stood and fought against tyranny in a giant undertaking unparalleled in human history.” Unlike Mr. Reagan, though, Mr. Trump will be hard-pressed to convince skeptical European allies that […]

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The Old Scourge of Anti-Semitism Rises Anew in Europe

For years, Europe maintained the comforting notion that it was earnestly confronting anti-Semitism after the horrors of the Holocaust. It now faces the alarming reality that anti-Semitism is sharply on the rise, often from the sadly familiar direction of the far right, but also from Islamists and the far left. The worrisome trend was underscored […]

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Amid Rising Anti-Semitism, German Official Advises Jews Against Wearing Skullcaps in Public

BERLIN — Germany’s top official responsible for efforts against anti-Semitism suggested this weekend that Jews should not wear their skullcaps everywhere in public, setting off a debate about balancing personal safety and the right to religious freedom in the country. The recommendation by Felix Klein, a federal official, came amid growing evidence that, three-quarters of […]

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Why Fiction Trumps Truth

Many people believe that truth conveys power. If some leaders, religions or ideologies misrepresent reality, they will eventually lose to more clearsighted rivals. Hence sticking with the truth is the best strategy for gaining power. Unfortunately, this is just a comforting myth. In fact, truth and power have a far more complicated relationship, because in […]

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