Tag: Holocaust and the Nazi Era

Extinction Rebellion Co-Founder Apologizes for Holocaust Remarks

LONDON — A founder of the climate activism group Extinction Rebellion apologized on Thursday for the “crass words” he used to describe the Holocaust as “an almost normal event” and just another ugly episode in human history. The founder, Roger Hallam, said in an interview with the German weekly Die Zeit that among various genocides […]

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Hitler’s Birthplace in Austria to Become a Police Station

BERLIN — After years of wrangling over the future of the butter-yellow house in Austria where Hitler was born, the authorities have decided to turn the building into a police station, in a bid make it less of a magnet for neo-Nazis. With the move, announced by the interior minister on Tuesday, the Austrian authorities […]

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NASA Renames Object After Uproar Over Old Name’s Nazi Connotations

What does a small, icy world roughly four billion miles from Earth have to do with the Nazis? That’s the question NASA was wrestling with before it announced on Tuesday that a space object formerly known by the nickname Ultima Thule would now officially be named Arrokoth, a Native American word meaning “sky.” The previous […]

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Holocaust Survivor Is Swept Up in Italy’s Storm of Vitriol

ROME — In a recent lecture at a Milan university, Liliana Segre, an 89-year-old Holocaust survivor honored as a senator for life, told students that “haters are people we should feel sorry for.” These are sorry days for Italy, then. Ms. Segre, who at 13 was deported to Auschwitz, where Nazis killed much of her […]

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Germany Has Been Unified for 30 Years. Its Identity Still Is Not.

East Germans, bio-Germans, passport Germans: In an increasingly diverse country, the legacy of a divided history has left many feeling like strangers in their own land. /* 6 slides ~ 16% each */ /* 100/6 ~ 16 = 16,32,48,64,80,96 */ @keyframes im0 { 0% { opacity: 1; } 15% { opacity: 1; } 17% { […]

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Teenage Rescuer, Now 92, Meets Family She Saved From Nazis

Sarah Yanai, an 86-year-old Holocaust survivor, clutched the handle of her wheelchair as she closed her eyes, and then opened her arms to embrace the woman who helped save her and most of her family from the Nazis more than 75 years ago. “How are you, how are you Melpo?” Ms. Yanai asked in Greek […]

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Florida Principal Who Wouldn’t Call Holocaust ‘Factual’ Is Fired

ImageThe principal of Spanish River Community High School in Boca Raton, Fla., was removed earlier this year and fired this week by school officials.Credit…Zuma Press/Alamy A high school principal in Florida who refused to acknowledge the Holocaust as “a factual, historical event” was fired on Wednesday by the Palm Beach County school board. The board […]

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Classical Music and Fetishes Unite in Historical Center of Gay Culture

BERLIN — A hush fell over the hundreds of kinksters gathered in the pews of the Twelve Apostles Church in Berlin when the cellist, clad in head-to-toe black leather, took a seat in front of the altar and began to play Rachmaninoff. At the back of the room, ushers from the nun-themed drag troupe The […]

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‘Hitler or Höcke?’ Germany’s Far-Right Party Radicalizes

BERLIN — It was a stunt but it was revealing. Lawmakers of the far-right Alternative for Germany were read quotations and then asked: Were these penned by Björn Höcke, the party’s most notorious far-right firebrand — or by Hitler? “I can’t tell,” one said. “I really don’t know,” another replied. “More likely ‘Mein Kampf,’” a […]

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Dorothea Buck, 102, Dies; Nazi Victim and Voice for Mentally Ill

In March 1936, a week before Hitler’s troops reoccupied the Rhineland, violating the treaty that a defeated Germany had signed to end World War I, Dorothea Buck, the 19-year-old daughter of a German pastor, was so traumatized by the prospect of another brutal European war that she had to be hospitalized. Ruled schizophrenic, she was […]

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A Nazi Version of DDT Was Forgotten. Could It Help Fight Malaria?

What if, after the Allies won World War II, world health officials had employed a Nazi version of DDT against mosquitoes that transmit malaria? Could that persistent disease, which still infects more than 200 million people a year and kills 400,000 of them, have been wiped off the planet? That is one of the musings […]

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When We Laugh at Nazis, Maybe the Joke’s on Us

Even if Max Bialystock hadn’t gone to prison for embezzling from the backers of his hit Broadway show, trouble would have found him one way or another. Didn’t he slap his business partner, the accountant Leo Bloom, after dousing the poor man with a glass of water during working hours? And while Max’s hanky-panky with […]

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For Poland, Nobel Prize in Literature Is Cause for Conflict as Much as Congratulation

WARSAW, Poland — Winning a Nobel Prize in Literature is usually a cause for celebration in the writer’s home country, a point of pride and a justification for a bit of patriotic pomp. But in Poland, where the nation is engaged in a bitter and consequential battle over the question of what it means to […]

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Is There Freedom of Speech in Germany?

HAMBURG, Germany — Germany doesn’t have a problem with free speech. It has two — or rather, it is caught between two very different conceptions of free speech, each of which has significant shortcomings and each of which is rooted in our inability to close the chasm that remains between eastern and western Germany, 30 […]

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Revisiting Hitler, in a New Authoritarian Age

When not at work on a book about the roots of anti-Semitism in his country, the German historian and Holocaust expert Peter Longerich has been thinking about 1923. In that year, Longerich explained, Germany faced a severe crisis. The economy teetered, separatist movements accelerated in multiple states and, in November, the upstart politician Adolf Hitler […]

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Dutch Railroad Reckons With Holocaust Shame, 70 Years Later

AMSTERDAM — The indispensable role that German railroads played as part of the Nazi machinery of genocide during World War II has long been known. But it may be only now that the Dutch are beginning to fully reckon with the role that their own national railroad played in the Holocaust. For several decades, according […]

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Hearing the Shofar’s Cry in the Jerusalem of Lithuania

I spend a lot of time in cemeteries. It’s part of the gig: I’m a rabbi. And my Hebrew name — Avraham Yitzhak — is common enough that I often see myself on gravestones, an eerie reminder of the liturgy we’ll recite this Rosh Hashana: “A man’s origin and end is from dust.” But last […]

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Teenager’s Diary Offers Window Into Life Under Soviets and Nazis

ImageElizabeth Bellak under a picture of her sister, Renia Spiegel, in New York, in 2016.CreditBrian Harkin for The New York Times PRZEMYSL, Poland — She was a Jewish teenager in a small trade city in southeastern Poland when she began writing her diary, months before the advent of World War II. By the time she […]

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An Improbable Relic of Auschwitz: a Shofar That Defied the Nazis

For years there have been fragmentary reports of almost unbelievable acts of faith at the Nazi death camps during World War II: the sounding of shofars, the ram’s horn trumpets traditionally blown by Jews to welcome the High Holy Days. These stories of the persistence of hope even in mankind’s darkest moments have been passed […]

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A Nazi Design Show Draws Criticism. Its Curator’s Comments Didn’t Help.

DEN BOSCH, the Netherlands — What do the Volkswagen Beetle, Germany’s autobahn highway system and oak trees all have in common? They were all used as symbols of German strength and ingenuity, part of Adolf Hitler’s propaganda machine intended to market Nazi ideology. A new exhibition at the Design Museum Den Bosch in the Netherlands, […]

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Edda Servi Machlin, 93, Champion of Italian Jewish Cuisine, Dies

Edda Servi Machlin, who survived the harrowing World War II years in Italy by hiding out with anti-Fascist partisans, then immigrated to the United States and wrote a definitive cookbook on Italian Jewish food, died on Aug. 16 at her home in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. She was 93. Her daughter Gia Machlin […]

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