Tag: Deaths (Obituaries)

Charlie Daniels, Who Bridged Country Music and Rock, Dies at 83

NASHVILLE — Charlie Daniels, the singer, songwriter and bandleader known for his brash down-home persona and his blazing fiddle work on hits like “The Devil Went Down to Georgia,” died on Monday in Nashville. He was 83. His publicist announced the death, at Summit Medical Center in the Hermitage section of the city, saying the […]

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Ennio Morricone, Influential Creator of Music for Modern Cinema, Dies at 91

Ennio Morricone, the Italian composer whose atmospheric scores for spaghetti westerns and some 500 films by a Who’s Who of international directors made him one of the world’s most versatile and influential creators of music for the modern cinema, died on Monday in Rome. He was 91. His death was confirmed by his lawyer, Giorgio […]

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Broadway Actor Nick Cordero Dead at 41 of Coronavirus

Nick Cordero, a musical theater actor whose intimidating height and effortless charm brought him a series of tough-guy roles on Broadway, died on Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 41. His death was announced on Instagram by his wife, Amanda Kloots. The couple, who moved from New York to Los Angeles […]

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Nick Cordero, Nominated for Tony as Tap-Dancing Tough Guy, Dies at 41

Nick Cordero, a musical theater actor whose intimidating height and effortless charm brought him a series of tough-guy roles on Broadway, died on Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 41. His death was announced on Instagram by his wife, Amanda Kloots. The couple, who moved from New York to Los Angeles […]

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Rudolfo Anaya, a Father of Chicano Literature, Dies at 82

Rudolfo Anaya, a writer whose trailblazing explorations of the folkways of the Southwest helped define the Latino experience in the United States, died on Sunday at his home in Albuquerque. He was 82. His niece Belinda Henry said his death followed a long illness. Mr. Anaya burst onto the American literary scene in 1972 with […]

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Margaret Morton, Photographer at Home With the Homeless, Dies at 71

From her apartment on East 10th Street in Manhattan, Margaret Morton had a front row view of the homeless encampments that engulfed Tompkins Square Park in the late 1980s. As she walked to work at Cooper Union, where she was a professor, she began to photograph these improvised structures, showing the ways people were moved […]

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Lenora Fay Garfinkel, 90, Architect for Orthodox Jewish Communities, Dies

This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about others here. When Leonard Josephy took the admissions exam for Cooper Union in 1949, the circumstances were unusual in two ways. The first was that it was a Sunday, because as an observant Jew, Leonard could not […]

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Hugh Downs, Perennial Small-Screen Fixture, Is Dead at 99

Hugh Downs, whose honeyed delivery and low-key but erudite manner helped make him a familiar face and voice on television for half a century, and whose career included long stints as host of both “Today” on NBC and “20/20” on ABC, died on Wednesday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 99. His family […]

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Lester Grinspoon, Influential Marijuana Scholar, Dies at 92

Dr. Lester Grinspoon, a Harvard psychiatry professor who became a leading proponent of legalizing marijuana after his research found it was less toxic or addictive than alcohol or tobacco, died on June 25 at his home in Newton, Mass. He was 92. His son David confirmed the death. Dr. Grinspoon was an unlikely crusader for […]

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Johnny Mandel, 94, Writer of Memorable Movie Scores, Is Dead

Johnny Mandel, who composed and arranged for some of the leading big bands of the 1940s and ’50s before establishing himself as a writer of memorable movie scores and themes like “The Shadow of Your Smile,” “Emily” and “Suicide Is Painless,” died on Monday at his home in Ojai, Calif. He was 94. His daughter, […]

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Carl Reiner, Multifaceted Master of Comedy, Is Dead at 98

Carl Reiner, who as performer, writer and director earned a place in comedy history several times over, died on Monday night at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 98. His death was confirmed by his daughter, Annie Reiner. Mr. Reiner first attracted national attention in 1950 as Sid Caesar’s multitalented second banana on the […]

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Madeline McWhinney Dale, Trailblazing Banker, Is Dead at 98

In the 1940s and ’50s, when Madeline McWhinney was a young economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, banking was such a men’s club that meetings were often held inside one. At such gatherings at the Union League Club on Park Avenue, which didn’t allow women to join until the late 1980s, Ms. […]

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Ruth Buchanan, Philanthropist and Hostess Extraordinaire, Is Dead at 101

Ruth Buchanan, the Dow Chemical heiress who entertained world leaders as the wife of an ambassador and White House chief of protocol and dazzled American society in her own opulent mansions in Washington and Newport, R.I., died on Nov. 18 at her home in Washington. She was 101. Mrs. Buchanan’s death, which was not widely […]

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Linda Cristal, Who Starred in ‘High Chaparral,’ Dies at 89

Linda Cristal, an Argentine-born actress who played Victoria, the regal, fiery wife of the rancher Big John Cannon on the 1960s television series “The High Chaparral,” died on Saturday at her home in Beverly Hills, Calif. She was 89. Her death was confirmed by her son Jordan Wexler, who said she died in her sleep. […]

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Charles Webb, Elusive Author of ‘The Graduate,’ Dies at 81

Charles Webb, who wrote the 1963 novel “The Graduate,” the basis for the hit 1967 film, and then spent decades running from its success, died on June 16 in East Sussex, England. He was 81. A spokesman for his son John confirmed the death, in a hospital, but did not specify the cause. Mr. Webb’s […]

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Lester Crystal, Guiding Force Behind ‘NewsHour,’ Dies at 85

Lester M. Crystal, who after 20 years at NBC News, including two as its president, moved to “The MacNeil/Lehrer Report” on PBS and immediately set about transforming it from a half-hour program into “The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour,” a broadcast widely acclaimed for its breadth and depth, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. He was 85. His son […]

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Lester Crystal, Guiding Force Behind ‘NewsHour,’ Dies at 85

Lester M. Crystal, who after 20 years at NBC News, including two as its president, moved to “The MacNeil/Lehrer Report” on PBS and immediately set about transforming it from a half-hour program into “The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour,” a broadcast widely acclaimed for its breadth and depth, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. He was 85. His son […]

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Milton Glaser, Designer of Iconic ‘I ♥ NY’ Logo, Is Dead at 91

Milton Glaser, a graphic designer who changed the vocabulary of American visual culture in the 1960s and ’70s with his brightly colored, extroverted posters, magazines, book covers and record sleeves, notably his 1967 poster of Bob Dylan with psychedelic hair and his “I ♥ NY” logo, died Friday, his 91st birthday, in Manhattan. The cause […]

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Sister Angela Marie Rooney, 103, Dies; Oldest Member of Her Order in New York

This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about others here. When Sister Angela Marie Rooney was 98 years old, she moved out of the Roman Catholic Convent of Mary the Queen in Yonkers, N.Y., and into an assisted living facility run by Jewish Home Lifecare […]

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Li Zhensheng, Photographer of China’s Cultural Revolution, Dies at 79

Li Zhensheng, a photographer who at great personal risk documented the dark side of Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution, producing powerful black-and-white images that remain a rare visual testament to the brutality of that tumultuous period, many of them not developed or seen for years, has died. He was 79. His death was confirmed on Tuesday […]

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Michael Hawley, Programmer, Professor and Pianist, Dies at 58

Michael Hawley, a computer programmer, professor, musician, speechwriter and impresario who helped lay the intellectual groundwork for what is now called the Internet of Things, died on Wednesday at his home in Cambridge, Mass. He was 58. The cause was colon cancer, said his father, George Hawley. Mr. Hawley began his career as a video […]

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Shirley Siegel, Leading New York Civil Rights Lawyer, Dies at 101

Shirley A. Siegel, who as a top law school graduate overcame rejections by 40 male-dominated law firms before forging a career as a leading civil rights lawyer, arguing cases before the Supreme Court and becoming New York State’s first female solicitor general, died on Monday at her home in Manhattan. She was 101. Her daughter, […]

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Joel Schumacher, Director of ‘St. Elmo’s Fire,’ Is Dead at 80

Joel Schumacher, the director whose visually inventive and sometimes subversive movies — including the coming-of-age drama “St. Elmo’s Fire,” the vampire action-comedy “The Lost Boys” and the campy superhero caper “Batman & Robin” — became cultural mile markers of the 1980s and ’90s, died on Monday in New York City. He was 80. The cause […]

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Paolo Giorgio Ferri, Hunter of Looted Antiquities, Dies at 72

When the Italian prosecutor Paolo Giorgio Ferri visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2004, he posed for a picture beside an ancient terra cotta mixing bowl so rare and celebrated that it had held pride of place in the Met’s Greek and Roman galleries for 32 years. Four years later, as a result of […]

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Carlos Ruiz Zafón, Author of ‘The Shadow of the Wind,’ Dies at 55

MADRID — Carlos Ruiz Zafón, whose mystery novel “The Shadow of the Wind” became one of the best-selling Spanish books of all time, died on Friday at his home in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 55. His death was announced by his Spanish publishing house, Planeta. His literary agent, Antonia Kerrigan, said the cause was […]

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Lynika Strozier, Who Researched Early Plant DNA, Dies at 35

This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about others here. For the last 15 years of her short life, Lynika Strozier dedicated herself with increasing fervor to a career in science, much of it as a researcher at the Field Museum in Chicago, where she […]

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Nikita Price, Homeless Father Turned Advocate for Homeless, Dies at 63

Nikita Price’s father named him after Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet premier, during the height of the Cold War, and it was just the sort of gesture Nikita would appreciate, his friends said: defiant, outraged, but with a sly wink at the absurdity of it. Khrushchev! In Rochester, N.Y., in the 1950s! Nikita, of course, called […]

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