Tag: Civil Rights Movement (1954-68)

Harlem Mourns the Rev. Calvin Butts III

Sitting in the front row of the Abyssinian Baptist Church’s upstairs pews on Sunday for the first service since the Harlem church’s beloved pastor died, Lisa White-Tingling began to tear up. “I’m not ready for this,” she said. “I’m not ready for him not to be here.” The church gathered for a special service to […]

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New York to Pay $26 Million to Men Wrongly Convicted of Killing Malcolm X

New York City has agreed to pay $26 million to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of two men whose convictions in the 1965 assassination of Malcolm X were thrown out last year after a judge found “serious miscarriages of justice,” according to the city and federal court records. The two men, Muhammad A. Aziz and […]

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Kari Ann Lake’s Hijacking of Martin Luther King

Let’s stop here and start to set the record straight. The Democratic Party is not the party of Dr. King. He was devoted to principles and policies, not parties. In fact, he once said: “I don’t think the Republican Party is a party full of the almighty God, nor is the Democratic Party. They both […]

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There Is a Way to Make America Safe for Democracy

There was, however, a majority vote to protect the rights of voters in the South. But that vote — the vote to pass the 1890 Federal Elections Bill, which would have empowered the national government to supervise elections in the former Confederate states — failed to overcome a Senate filibuster. We cannot know how American […]

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When Segregationists Offered One-Way Tickets to Black Southerners

When two planeloads of asylum seekers were flown to Martha’s Vineyard last month, Peola Denham Jr. recognized an echo of his own experience from six decades ago — one nearly forgotten in the long history of Black Americans’ struggle for civil rights. “What really took me back,” recalled Mr. Denham, 73, “is that when the […]

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The Fiery Brilliance of Obama’s Lost Book Manuscript

The fruits of that education were on display in “Transformative Politics.” Written during Mr. Obama’s final semester, the manuscript updated Bayard Rustin for the age of Ronald Reagan. Mr. Obama’s and Mr. Fisher’s plan hinged on recruiting blue-collar whites back into a reborn version of the March on Washington coalition. According to Mr. Obama and […]

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Let’s Talk About the Economic Roots of White Supremacy

In my Tuesday column on the political incentives within the Republican Party, I made an analogy to the struggle over civil rights in the midcentury Democratic Party. I brought up the Dixiecrats and mentioned their opposition to labor rights as well as civil rights. Let’s talk about that. Most Americans tend to think of Jim […]

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Glenn Youngkin Is Playing a Dangerous Game

Their arrival marked the beginning of a tectonic shift in American political life. “The difference in laws between the North and the South created a political coming-of-age for Black migrants,” the political scientist Keneshia N. Grant writes in “The Great Migration and the Democratic Party: Black Voters and the Realignment of American Politics in the […]

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Education in America: School Is for Making Citizens

Why do we have public schools? To make young people into educated, productive adults, of course. But public schools are also for making Americans. Thus, public education requires lessons about history — the American spirit and its civics — and also contact with and context about other Americans: who we are and what has made […]

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Mississippi Grand Jury Declines to Indict Woman in Emmett Till Murder Case

A grand jury in Mississippi examining the case of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old Black boy whose 1955 abduction and killing became a galvanizing force for the civil rights movement, has declined to indict the white woman whose accusations spurred the attack, prosecutors said on Tuesday. The Leflore County, Miss., jury found that there was not […]

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Eli N. Evans, Who Wrote About Jews in American South, Dies at 85

Eli Nachamson Evans was born on July 28, 1936, in Durham. According to his son, family lore had it that Evans was an Anglicized version of Eban, the Hebrew word for stonecutter. (Coincidentally, Mr. Evans was good friends with the Israeli diplomat Abba Eban, though they were not related.) Mr. Evans’s paternal grandfather, Issac, was […]

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Nichelle Nichols Helped Show America a Different Future

“She walks in beauty like the night. …” A grinning Spock greets Lieutenant Uhura with a line of Byron at one point in their decades of shared “Star Trek” adventures. Now, this was way, way back when Leonard Nimoy’s Spock occasionally grinned, but walk with me here: Even the alien knew a queen when he […]

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Among Pro Athletes, Bill Russell Was a Pioneering Activist

It’s easy to remember the shots that Bill Russell blocked or the N.B.A. championships he won. After all, there were so many of each that he is considered one of the greatest basketball players in history, and in some corners, the greatest, period. But after his nearly nine decades of life, his most consequential legacy […]

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Jackie Robinson Museum Focuses on Civils Rights and Baseball

Jackie Robinson’s family home in Stamford, Conn., had a den featuring trophies, artifacts and a big scrapbook commemorating his many achievements. David Robinson, his son, fondly recalled in an interview how one wall held photos and plaques depicting his father’s success in sports. Another wall — with a collection twice as big — highlighted his […]

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