Tag: Civil Rights Movement (1954-68)

Juanita Abernathy, a Force in the Civil Rights Movement, Dies at 88

Juanita Abernathy, who helped organize the Montgomery bus boycott and took part in other pivotal protests at the outset of the civil rights era alongside the Rev. Dr. Ralph Abernathy, her husband and a leader of the movement, died on Thursday at a hospital in Atlanta. She was 88. The cause was a stroke, her […]

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Robert F. Kennedy Assassin Sirhan Sirhan Is Said to Have Been Stabbed

Sirhan B. Sirhan, who is serving a life sentence for the 1968 assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy, was in stable condition at a Southern California hospital on Friday night after reports that he had been stabbed in prison by another inmate, the state prison system said. The state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation would […]

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Episode 1: The Fight for a True Democracy

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher “They had been made black by those who believed themselves to be white. And where they were headed, black equaled slave.” Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans […]

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Introducing ‘1619,’ a New York Times Audio Series

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the British colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by […]

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Georgia Elementary School Is Accused of Racial Insensitivity Over Hairstyle Guidelines Display

From New Age box fades to braids, a display on the wall of a suburban Atlanta elementary school tried to illustrate a variety of “inappropriate” haircuts and hairstyles. But there was one thing the children who were photographed had in common: They were all black. The display by the Narvie J. Harris Theme School in […]

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Overlooked No More: Georgia Gilmore, Who Fed and Funded the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Klancy Miller It took all of Georgia Gilmore’s willpower not to explode at the driver of the crowded bus in Montgomery, Ala., one Friday afternoon in October 1955. She had just boarded and dropped her […]

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Emmett Till Sign Photo Leads Ole Miss Fraternity to Suspend Members

Three students at the University of Mississippi were suspended by their fraternity on Wednesday after an Instagram photo surfaced of them brandishing guns in front of a bullet-riddled memorial sign for Emmett Till, whose brutal murder in 1955 served as a catalyst for the civil rights movement. The photo of the smiling Kappa Alpha members […]

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Once Trump Talked About ‘American Carnage.’ Now He Says Critics Should Leave.

WASHINGTON — America stinks. At least that’s what Donald J. Trump seemed to be saying before becoming president. He did not believe in “American exceptionalism,” he said, because America was not exceptional. Instead, it was a “laughingstock” that was no better than Vladimir V. Putin’s Russia. By promising to make America great again, he made […]

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Ed Dwight Was Set to Be the First Black Astronaut. Here’s Why That Never Happened.

The bone-rattling trip to the upper reaches of Earth’s atmosphere used to require a steady hand, a powerful jet and the precision of an airman ready to dodge enemy fire. The dangers were immense. You could black out. Gravitational force could pull blood from your eyes, rendering you sightless. Or you could merely end up […]

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Sadie Roberts-Joseph, 75, Baton Rouge Community Leader, Is Found Dead in Homicide

Louisiana was bracing for a dangerous tropical storm over the weekend when the call came about a different kind of crisis: a dead body in a car trunk near downtown Baton Rouge. What the police discovered Friday was a surprising blow. The body was that of Sadie Roberts-Joseph, 75, a community leader and the founder […]

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Is It Time to Play With Spaceships Again?

[Read all Times reporting on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. | Sign up for the weekly Science Times email.] Most earthlings alive today were not yet around when humans landed on the moon. Millions of them seem willing to consider the far-out theory that it never even happened. To some of […]

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2019 Belongs to Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm stares out from the side of a dozen coffee mugs these days, her epochal glasses, brocade dresses and distinct crown of curls recognizable trademarks of the most regenerative political figure in modern American culture. As a number of new congresswomen begin to emerge in her image, Ms. Chisholm, who 50 years ago began […]

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2020 Democrats Address Poverty and Systemic Racism at Presidential Forum

WASHINGTON — Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Monday defended his approach to working with Republicans, suggesting that those who cannot conceive of compromising with the opposition might as well “start a real, physical revolution.” “Folks, look, if you start off with the notion there’s nothing you can do, well, might you all […]

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His Martin Luther King Biography Was a Classic. His Latest King Piece Is Causing a Furor.

When David J. Garrow, a Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., sat down last spring to dig through a trove of previously unreleased government records, it was business as usual for a researcher known for prodigious reporting and doorstop books. “There’s this weird ability I have of complete recall with […]

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A Black Feminist’s Response to Attacks on Martin Luther King Jr.’s Legacy

As a black feminist and a civil rights historian, I do not need to be persuaded that many black male ministers during the civil rights era were morally duplicitous, felt sexually entitled and slept around. So did many Catholic priests, politicians, Hollywood celebrities and some award-winning male academics. Many historians have already argued that the […]

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Leah Chase, Creole Chef Who Fed Presidents and Freedom Riders, Dies at 96

Leah Chase, the nation’s pre-eminent Creole chef, always knew what to feed her famous customers. The Rev. Martin Luther King Sr. liked barbecued ribs, and James Baldwin preferred gumbo. The singer Sarah Vaughan ordered stuffed crab to go, and Nat King Cole always wanted a four-minute egg. She once had to stop President Barack Obama […]

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Leah Lange Chase, Famed Creole Cook Who Fed Civil Rights Leaders and Presidents, Is Dead at 96

Leah Lange Chase, the Creole cook whose gumbo sustained everyone from jazz superstars and two United States presidents to troubled families in the housing projects across the street from her family’s New Orleans restaurant, died on Saturday. She was 96. Her death was announced by her family. Mrs. Chase fed fried chicken, jambalaya and red […]

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At 90, Photographer Fred Baldwin Still Has ‘So Much Work Left to Do’

Fred Baldwin reckons he could have become a writer — if the manual Olivetti typewriter he used while studying at Columbia in 1955 had spell-check. But his spelling was atrocious and he was impatient, so he tried photography instead. He had beginner’s luck: He talked his way into Pablo Picasso’s villa in the south of […]

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