Tag: Historic Buildings and Sites

Can a New Arts Center Revitalize Provincetown?

PROVINCETOWN, Mass. — There was only one destination of choice for the literary set looking to leave New York City during the sweltering summer of 1916: Provincetown, at the outermost tip of Cape Cod. Once there, writers like John Reed and Louise Bryant, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, and an assorted cast of Greenwich Village radicals […]

Read More

George Floyd’s Killing Forces Wider Debate on France’s Slave-Trading Past

BORDEAUX, France — At a bend in the river, a succession of stately stone buildings, each more imposing than the last, stretches along the left bank. Their elegant 18th-century facade had helped Bordeaux, already famous for its wineries, become a UNESCO World Heritage site. “This facade, it’s a monumental and extraordinary heritage — and a […]

Read More

New Neolithic Finds Near Stonehenge Site

LONDON — A new archaeological discovery at the site of an ancient village near Stonehenge promises to offer significant clues about life more than 4,500 years ago in the Neolithic period, and could even “write a whole new chapter in the story” of the celebrated structure’s landscape, experts say. The find also makes the site the largest […]

Read More

They Live Alone in Ghost Towns

There are some 3,800 ghost towns in the United States, most abandoned in the 19th and early 20th centuries in favor of bigger cities, or casualties of changing industry. Some languish as ruins, others are designated as national parks. And a rare handful are in the midst of being developed into luxury vacation spots. The […]

Read More

How the Stoop and the Sidewalk Helped New Yorkers Stay Sane

Impromptu concerts from the fire escape. Food relief efforts staged on the sidewalk in front of a church. Friends spread out on the stoop and drinking tallboys. As the city reopens, New Yorkers emerging from quarantine might feel a bit nostalgic for the socially distant bonds they formed outside their homes. From the first days […]

Read More

Solving the Mystery of What Became of J.F.K.’s Other Patrol Boat

For decades, countless motorists and boaters have passed North Cove, a small recess along the Manhattan side of the Harlem River, unaware that a piece of presidential history may well have been embedded in the muddy bottom. That historical remnant may have finally come to light. Late last month, watched by a group of onlookers […]

Read More

Shearing Sheep, and Hewing to Tradition, on an Island in Maine

With travel restrictions in place worldwide, we’ve launched a new series, The World Through a Lens, in which photojournalists help transport you, virtually, to some of our planet’s most beautiful and intriguing places. This week, Greta Rybus shares a collection of photographs from a set of islands in Maine. Three miles off the coast of […]

Read More

Security Concerns Give the White House a Fortified New Look

WASHINGTON — President Trump was furious when news got out last weekend that as protesters gathered outside the White House he had been rushed to an underground bunker. But now, as crowds keep coming back to demonstrate, the entire White House seems to be turning into one. Every day, more fences go up and more […]

Read More

Quarantined in a Museum

Antonio Cruz, like so many New Yorkers in this pandemic, is stuck at home. Except in his case, home is a 28,000-square-foot, Greek-Revival mansion in a forest in the Bronx. And he lives there rent free. Mr. Cruz, 49, is the steward of Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum in the northeast corner of the borough, through a […]

Read More

A London Home Goes From Georgian to Modern, With a Detour

This article is part of our latest Design special report, which is about crossing the borders of space, time and media. When Heather Kane was scouring her favorite London neighborhoods two years ago searching for an apartment to buy, she discovered a promising candidate on the first floor of an 18th-century townhouse on Harley Street, […]

Read More

Can Coney Island Survive This?

This summer was supposed to be big for Coney Island. Memorial Day weekend would mark the 100th anniversary of the Wonder Wheel, Coney Island’s 15-story feat of engineering in the form of a Ferris wheel, with swinging cars and panoramic views of both city and ocean. A three-day centennial celebration was planned, including a performance […]

Read More

David Carter, a Historian of Stonewall, Is Dead at 67

David Carter, whose careful research into the Stonewall Inn uprising of 1969, a pivotal event in gay rights history, culminated in an authoritative book on the subject and helped win the area in Greenwich Village where the episode occurred a listing in the National Register of Historic Places, died on May 1 at his home […]

Read More

Keeping a Distance, From Everything but Nature

New York, we know, is a city of interiors — the museums and the concert halls, the word-of-mouth restaurants and the pheromone-fogged bars. Those places have been unavailable for months now and are likely to stay that way for months more. To protect ourselves and others, we have been asked to remain in our homes, […]

Read More

A Poetic Journey Through Western China

Image For years, Silk Road travelers made the grueling trek past towering mountain ranges and ancient cities now lost to time. Centuries later, one writer attempts to retrace the journey. A temple on Crescent Lake at Mingsha Shan (Echoing Sand Mountain) near the town of Dunhuang in Gansu, China. Dunhuang was an important strategic base […]

Read More

Brooklyn Bridge, Star of the City: Here’s a Tour

When they were home in Brooklyn Heights, Emily Roebling and her husband, Washington, could look toward the East River and see how work was progressing on the Brooklyn Bridge. Washington was in charge of construction. He took over after his father, the bridge’s genius engineer, John Augustus Roebling, died in 1869. Then Washington suffered the […]

Read More

The Hidden Feats That Built New York’s Towering Skyscrapers

Over the years, architects have not been the only ones to inscribe New York’s skyline — the signature image of the last American century — across the urban ether. Among others, structural engineers, practical poets of often towering imagination and import, have also figured out how to scale those heights. Skyscrapers are team efforts, after […]

Read More

A Cast-Iron SoHo Facade and Its Odyssey to New Jersey and Back

After a heavy rain in 2004, the iron-fronted 1886 loft building at 74 Grand Street suddenly began listing to starboard, terrifying the people inside and earning the five-story structure the nickname the Leaning Tower of SoHo. Over time, the tilt toward Wooster Street grew to an alarming 30 inches or so, and in 2010 the […]

Read More

Classic Skyscrapers Define New York. Take a Virtual Tour.

It’s a metaphor for Manhattan, a synonym for “Mad Men,” the apex of midcentury modernist New York. It supplanted some of the city’s stateliest mansions with corporate palaces in blue glass and bronze. The Park Avenue School of Architecture is the term the critic Ada Louise Huxtable employed to define the “sleek and shiny” postwar […]

Read More

That Face Shield Might Have Been Made in a Party Space

Last spring, Manhattan’s meatpacking district was hopping with stylish hotels, rooftop cocktail lounges, luxury boutiques, overpriced brunch spots and nightclubs with velvet ropes. This spring, a refurbished loft with white-painted brick walls and a chef’s kitchen was supposed to be part of the scene. It would serve as a high-end showroom and co-working space by […]

Read More

500 Years Ago, This Port Linked East to West. Its Fate Was to Fade Away.

ImageA tourist boat in the old part of Malacca, Malaysia, in February. MALACCA, Malaysia — About the fastest moving force these days in the old Portuguese Settlement of Malacca is the sweat trickling down the torsos of the underemployed. In the stifling heat — it’s always hot in Malacca — a group of such shirtless […]

Read More

Mystery Shipwreck Dates to Before Revolutionary War, Researcher Says

In 1769, a cargo ship laden with flour, pork and English goods set sail from Salem, Mass., headed to Portland, Maine. The ship encountered a fierce storm and never made it to its destination. Now a maritime archaeologist believes he may have solved the mystery. Every few years, the remains of a shipwreck have surfaced […]

Read More

Take a Virtual Tour of New York’s Museum District

The Metropolitan Museum was preparing to celebrate its 150th anniversary right about now. But with Covid-19, it has closed along with the Guggenheim, the Neue Galerie, the Cooper Hewitt and all the other museums along the tony stretch of the Upper East Side known as Museum Mile. This is the second in a series of […]

Read More

A Brooklyn Dodgers Fan Who Never Gave Up on Ebbets Field

Nobody ever accused Rod Kennedy Jr. of thinking too small. A Brooklyn Dodgers fan who took a beating in a Pelham, N. Y., schoolyard in the 1950s defending his team’s honor against partisans of the New York Yankees and Giants, he began making his living 35 years later by manufacturing tiny tin replicas of ballparks. […]

Read More

Broadway Is Shuttered but Its Buildings Sing: A Virtual Tour

Weeks ago, back when New Yorkers were starting to shelter at home but it was still kosher to get a little fresh air and take a walk, I invited a few people to suggest modest strolls, one on one, around places meaningful to them. They would guide the tour. The goal? Simple. Distraction, joy, consolation, […]

Read More

After the Fire, a Chinatown Museum Sifts Through What Survived

When a fire ripped through the upper floors of the red brick building that held the archives of the Museum of Chinese in America, the staff thought that all was lost. The second floor of 70 Mulberry Street, a 130-year-old building that is a cherished cultural landmark in Chinatown, had been home to 85,000 items […]

Read More

A Big Idea and a Big Donor Bring a New Art Museum to Austria

VIENNA — Amid hammering and drilling, works by the Austrian artists Valie Export, Arnulf Rainer and Günter Brus waited quietly in a row against a white wall, ready to be hung. The building where they are to be displayed is a longstanding, if long decrepit, landmark: the Künstlerhaus, on Vienna’s grand Ringstrasse, provided in 1868 […]

Read More

The Neighborhood Name Game

Manhattan, for all its charms, can sometimes fail the imagination. From the “financial district” to “Midtown” to the “Upper West Side,” the names of neighborhoods can seem just-the-facts dull, seeming to prefer literal and safe over style and mystery. It wasn’t always this way. Checkering the borough once were names far more novel, like Mackarelville […]

Read More

5 Caribbean Islands Where You Can Go Beyond the Beach

Think of the Caribbean, and a certain image comes to mind: an unblemished white-sand beach, lapped by clear turquoise waters. And there’s little doubt that many of the millions of visitors who come to the region annually do so to simply sit at the beach with sunscreen, a must-read novel and perhaps a rum-based drink […]

Read More

Secret Passage Dating to 1660 Is Found Inside U.K. Parliament

LONDON — A 360-year-old passageway once used by British monarchs has been rediscovered inside Parliament, revealing a piece of history that was thought to have been permanently covered up after World War II. For decades, it was thought that the only remnant of the passageway, built in 1660, was a brass plaque inside Westminster Hall, the […]

Read More

A Bittersweet Homecoming for Egypt’s Jews

CAIRO — Clutching a decades-old black-and-white photo, Doris Wolanski directed a vehicle through Cairo’s chaotic traffic, her gaze trained on the street corners, in search of rue du Metro. The photo showed an 8-year-old girl and her mother on a balcony overlooking a wide, deserted boulevard. The girl was Mrs. Wolanski, now 71; the apartment […]

Read More