Tag: Historic Buildings and Sites

The Unexpectedly Tropical History of Brutalism

ImageIn the beach town of Ubatuba, Brazil, rises a reinforced concrete house — with an external staircase in the same material — built in 2014 into the canopy by the São Paulo architect Angelo Bucci and his firm SPBR.CreditTodd Hido Long associated with European cities, the style has plenty of history in other parts of […]

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This Land Is a Sanctuary for Aboriginal Women. Bulldozers May Soon Come.

DJAB WURRUNG COUNTRY, Australia — For dozens of generations, this serene stretch in the highlands of southeastern Australia has been a sanctuary for the women of the Djab Wurrung people, where babies were delivered in the hollows of majestic birthing trees and the placentas were planted nearby to imbue saplings with their spirit. “This is […]

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Where Libraries are the Tourist Attractions

About a decade ago libraries across the world faced a dilemma. Their vital functions — to supply books and access to information for the public — were being replaced by Amazon, e-books and public Wi-Fi. To fight for their survival, said Loida Garcia-Febo, president of the American Library Association, libraries tried to determine what other […]

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What Should an Artist Save?

IT WAS THE EARLY ’80S and a low point for Judy Chicago. The artist had spent more than half of the previous decade creating “The Dinner Party,” an ambitious work of art for which she is today perhaps best known but at the time had earned her ridicule. The unapologetically feminist installation piece, a triangular […]

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The Hotel Historian Is at Your Service

Ken Price was hired 36 years ago as director of public relations at the Palmer House Hilton. But it’s his other gig at the renowned Chicago property that speaks more to him: That of hotel historian, an official title he has held for 11 years. Mr. Price is the go-to guy for anything relating to […]

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From Former Mental Hospital to Recreational Hub

COLUMBIA, S.C. — The South Carolina Lunatic Asylum admitted its first patient in 1828. Ever since, its impressive brick wards surrounded by nearly 200 acres of leafy lawns and gardens served as landmarks in Columbia, the state’s capital. Almost 200 years later, and three decades after the last patient was discharged, the old brick buildings […]

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Why Are Native Hawaiians Protesting Against a Telescope?

A last-ditch effort by Native Hawaiians to stop construction at a culturally significant site on Hawaii’s Big Island has begun to attract national attention — echoing in some ways the protests by Native Americans in 2016 and 2017 against the Dakota Access pipeline project. Here is what you need to know about the dispute in […]

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Crystal Cathedral in California Gets a New Life as a Catholic Church

A prominent house of worship in Southern California has been flipped — from a towering glass megachurch of a flamboyant televangelist to the new seat of the seventh-largest Roman Catholic Church diocese in the United States. The landmark, originally named the Crystal Cathedral, hosted its first Mass on Wednesday following a $77 million renovation by […]

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An Eccentric Upstate Home That Some People Confuse for a Restaurant

When the artist Cary Leibowitz and the creative director Simon Lince purchased their farmhouse in upstate New York in 2005, they intended to use it first and foremost as a quiet weekend retreat. The fact that it also provided a second home for the enormous trove of antiques and art objects that already filled their […]

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A Southern California Without Orange Groves? One of the Last Could Soon Be Gone

LOS ANGELES — Drive through the San Fernando Valley and it is easy to spot the hallmarks of suburban Southern California: streets lined with palm trees, carefully sheared hedges and red-tiled roofs, a blur of tidy development. But turn a corner in one neighborhood and a 12-acre orange grove comes brightly into view. Bothwell Ranch […]

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Should Neil Armstrong’s Bootprints Be on the Moon Forever?

[Read all Times reporting on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. | Sign up for the weekly Science Times email.] When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin visited the moon 50 years ago, they left roughly 100 objects behind, including a portion of their lunar lander, the American flag and, yes, various kinds […]

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Unesco Recognizes Heritage Sites, Ancient to Modern, Around the World

From iron works in Burkina Faso that date back nearly three millenniums, to the fortified and planned city of Jaipur in India, to the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan, Unesco has added a broad array of cultural and natural marvels to its World Heritage List. To be included on the list, a site must meet at […]

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‘We Cannot Save Everything’: A Historic Neighborhood Confronts Rising Seas

NEWPORT, R.I. — The Point, a waterfront neighborhood here, is one of the largest, best preserved and most important Colonial-era communities in the United States. Its grid of 18th-century streets contains scores of houses built before the American Revolution, and dozens more that are almost as old. “It’s incredible to walk around a neighborhood like […]

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James Monroe Enslaved Hundreds. Their Descendants Still Live Next Door.

[For more coverage of race, sign up here to have our Race/Related newsletter delivered weekly to your inbox.] CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — So many Monroes in rural Albemarle County remember the moment they asked a parent or grandparent if they were somehow connected to the nation’s fifth president, James Monroe. The telltale entrance sign to Monroe’s […]

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For Artist at Auschwitz, a Challenge: Stepping Into the Past, Not on It

OSWIECIM, Poland — The letter to Daniel Libeskind’s father arrived shortly after the war ended. His sister, Rozia, informed him that his family was dead. She was the only one of 10 siblings to survive Auschwitz. Over three handwritten pages in Yiddish, she detailed the horrors they endured. “As I write these words,” she concluded, […]

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Will Space-Age Houston Survive Into the Future?

A midcentury-modern house on the banks of languid Dickinson Bayou in Southeast Texas changed hands recently. While it could be mistaken for just another home, it is a place of outsize significance in aerospace history. In a small garage on West Bayou Drive, the space shuttle was born in secrecy 50 years ago. Today new […]

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Martinis at the Bar. Sinatra on Repeat. The TWA Hotel Sells a Jet-Age Fantasy.

Within the first couple of weeks there were half a dozen marriage proposals. Guys dropping to their knees in the Sunken Lounge and on the cantilevered catwalk — popping the question on the Solari split-flap departure board or in “Connie,” the 1958 TWA Lockheed Constellation Starliner parked outside on the roof of a new underground […]

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NASA Reopens Apollo Mission Control Room That Once Landed Men on Moon

[Read all Times reporting on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. | Sign up for the weekly Science Times email.] HOUSTON — After Gene Kranz retired in the 1990s, he started to give occasional tours to VIPs at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. It was there in the Apollo Mission Control Center that […]

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What’s It Like to Live in Barcelona’s Most Famous Gaudí Home? A Bit Inconvenient

BARCELONA, Spain — Every year, more than a million people visit the home of Ana Viladomiu in Barcelona. She does her best to avoid them. Ms. Viladomiu lives in La Pedrera, the last house built by Antoni Gaudí, the brilliant Catalan architect who died after being hit by a tram in 1926. His works around […]

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