Tag: Historic Buildings and Sites

Lions, Legends and the Pull of History in Senegal’s Energetic Capital

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Can the Rebirth of a Negro League Stadium Revive a Distressed City?

By Kelly Whiteside PATERSON, N.J. — There used to be a ballpark here, at the corner of Maple and Liberty. Baseball royalty once rounded the bases, and city residents once packed the stands. Now defaced with graffiti, Hinchliffe Stadium looks like a blighted lot about to be razed. Weeds and trees have uprooted the bleachers, […]

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Robert Indiana’s Island Home Still Grapples With His Legacy

VINALHAVEN, Me. — Forty-one years ago, when Robert Indiana, the artist, came to this remote island spotted with idle granite quarries, he fell in love with the place, and with a Victorian confection that he would make into his home. Mr. Indiana bought the building, once a meeting hall for the Independent Order of Odd […]

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Who Owns Gay Street?

Winding south from Waverly Place, north to Christopher Street, Gay Street is one of the shortest stretches of road in New York. But its mythology runs long. Let’s begin with the question “Why is it called Gay Street?’” There is no conclusive answer but plenty of postured certainty. It is called Gay Street because it […]

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South of Sydney, the Australian Coast Becomes Its Own Destination

Australia’s Eurobodalla, Shoalhaven and Sapphire coasts run about 250 miles from the dairy town of Berry — two hours south of Sydney via the Grand Pacific Drive, which is bordered by rolling farmland on one side and gleaming ocean on the other — down to a historic whaling center near the Victorian state border. In […]

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Amid the Renaissance Architecture of Florence, an Unexpected Villa

MARCEL PROUST ONCE referred to Florence as “a city miraculously embalmed.” Milan, largely destroyed during World War II, had no choice but to remake itself during the midcentury as a hub for fashion and design; Rome, its historic ruins lending it a sense of inimitable loucheness, has recently been given an infusion of bohemian energy […]

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In Munich and Dessau, Art and Design Call. But History Is Even More Compelling.

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A Motorcade on Mackinac Island? Pence’s Visit Breaks a Long Tradition

ImageCars and trucks have been banned on Mackinac Island for more than a hundred years, preserving a quaint atmosphere where people get around by bicycle, by horse or on foot.CreditEmily Rose Bennett for The New York Times It’s not hard to see why Mackinac Island, Mich., is called the jewel of the Great Lakes. Vacationers […]

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Who First Circled the Globe? Not Magellan, Spain Wants You to Know

GETARIA, Spain — On Sept. 20, 1519, the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan set out on what was to become the first circumnavigation of the world. The expedition helped reshape world trade and wrote Magellan’s name into the history books. It remains a major point of pride for Portugal, which two years ago asked UNESCO to […]

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The Most Instagrammable Neighborhood in America, Before It Was Cool

The view of the Manhattan Bridge from Dumbo has become so Instagram-famous that it has entered the realm of the Eiffel Tower and latte foam: People take pictures of it because people take pictures of it. Walter Benjamin, the German culture critic who famously warned that artworks lose their “aura” when they’re reproduced endlessly, may […]

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Cable Cars Over Jerusalem? Some See ‘Disneyfication’ of Holy City

JERUSALEM — At a glance, Jerusalem’s Holy Basin still looks pretty much as it must have looked centuries ago. The Old City’s yellow walls still read in silhouette against an ancient landscape of parched hills and valleys. The skyline is still dominated by the city’s great Muslim and Christian shrines: the gold, glistening Dome of […]

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The City Poised to Become Europe’s Next Affordable Creative Haven

Over the past five years, Albania has been discovered by travelers as that rare thing: a largely unexplored corner of Europe (one with some 265 miles of coastline). The small Balkan country sits just across the Adriatic and Ionian seas from Italy’s heel and a mere 45-minute ferry ride away from the Greek island of […]

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Utopia, Abandoned

IN THE 1950S, the small town of Ivrea, which is about an hour’s train ride north of Turin, became the site of an unheralded experiment in living and working. Olivetti, a renowned designer and manufacturer of typewriters and accounting machines, decided to provide for its employees through retirement. They were given the opportunity to take […]

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The Unexpectedly Tropical History of Brutalism

ImageIn the beach town of Ubatuba, Brazil, rises a reinforced concrete house — with an external staircase in the same material — built in 2014 into the canopy by the São Paulo architect Angelo Bucci and his firm SPBR.CreditTodd Hido Long associated with European cities, the style has plenty of history in other parts of […]

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This Land Is a Sanctuary for Aboriginal Women. Bulldozers May Soon Come.

DJAB WURRUNG COUNTRY, Australia — For dozens of generations, this serene stretch in the highlands of southeastern Australia has been a sanctuary for the women of the Djab Wurrung people, where babies were delivered in the hollows of majestic birthing trees and the placentas were planted nearby to imbue saplings with their spirit. “This is […]

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Where Libraries are the Tourist Attractions

About a decade ago libraries across the world faced a dilemma. Their vital functions — to supply books and access to information for the public — were being replaced by Amazon, e-books and public Wi-Fi. To fight for their survival, said Loida Garcia-Febo, president of the American Library Association, libraries tried to determine what other […]

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What Should an Artist Save?

IT WAS THE EARLY ’80S and a low point for Judy Chicago. The artist had spent more than half of the previous decade creating “The Dinner Party,” an ambitious work of art for which she is today perhaps best known but at the time had earned her ridicule. The unapologetically feminist installation piece, a triangular […]

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The Hotel Historian Is at Your Service

Ken Price was hired 36 years ago as director of public relations at the Palmer House Hilton. But it’s his other gig at the renowned Chicago property that speaks more to him: That of hotel historian, an official title he has held for 11 years. Mr. Price is the go-to guy for anything relating to […]

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From Former Mental Hospital to Recreational Hub

COLUMBIA, S.C. — The South Carolina Lunatic Asylum admitted its first patient in 1828. Ever since, its impressive brick wards surrounded by nearly 200 acres of leafy lawns and gardens served as landmarks in Columbia, the state’s capital. Almost 200 years later, and three decades after the last patient was discharged, the old brick buildings […]

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Why Are Native Hawaiians Protesting Against a Telescope?

A last-ditch effort by Native Hawaiians to stop construction at a culturally significant site on Hawaii’s Big Island has begun to attract national attention — echoing in some ways the protests by Native Americans in 2016 and 2017 against the Dakota Access pipeline project. Here is what you need to know about the dispute in […]

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