Tag: art

Can a New Arts Center Revitalize Provincetown?

PROVINCETOWN, Mass. — There was only one destination of choice for the literary set looking to leave New York City during the sweltering summer of 1916: Provincetown, at the outermost tip of Cape Cod. Once there, writers like John Reed and Louise Bryant, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, and an assorted cast of Greenwich Village radicals […]

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3 Art Gallery Shows to Explore From Home

Richard Diebenkorn Ongoing. Van Doren Waxter, vandorenwaxter.com As an artist, Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) started young. His catalog raisonné begins with drawings he made in 1933, the year he turned 11: renderings of cowboys in strokes of dark, heavy pencil whose intensity goes beyond gun battles. “Paintings and Works on Paper 1946-1952,” the main exhibition at […]

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Ten Signature Images From Milton Glaser’s Eclectic Career

With the passing of Milton Glaser on Friday, his 91st birthday, New York lost a favorite son whose designs — and one in particular — radiated the vitality and multiplicity of his beloved hometown. Over seven decades, he produced an uncountable quantity of high-impact graphic imagery: first at Push Pin Studios, the countercultural and politically […]

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Art Auction or Game Show? Sotheby’s Tries Something New

LONDON — “This is what we like: the ping-pong between New York and Hong Kong. We see them on the split screens in perfect clarity,” the auctioneer Oliver Barker said late Monday, sounding like a prime-time TV game show host. He was taking seven-figure bids at a Sotheby’s sale of Impressionist, modern and contemporary art, […]

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‘Through Art, I Hope That We Can Make One Tulsa’

The empty storefronts and abandoned buildings that once lined the streets of the Greenwood district in Tulsa, Okla., are becoming canvases for a suppressed history of black excellence. Decades of segregation and disenfranchisement have plagued the neighborhood on the city’s north side, where Black Wall Street — one of the country’s most prosperous African-American communities […]

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Disputed African Artifacts Sell at Auction

“These artworks are stained with the blood of Biafra’s children,” wrote Chika Okeke-Agulu, an art history professor at Princeton, in an impassioned Instagram post three weeks ago calling for a halt to the sale of two wooden statues made by the Igbo people of Nigeria. Mr. Okeke-Agulu believes the items were looted in the late […]

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Milton Glaser, Designer of Iconic ‘I ♥ NY’ Logo, Is Dead at 91

Milton Glaser, a graphic designer who changed the vocabulary of American visual culture in the 1960s and ’70s with his brightly colored, extroverted posters, magazines, book covers and record sleeves, notably his 1967 poster of Bob Dylan with psychedelic hair and his “I ♥ NY” logo, died Friday, his 91st birthday, in Manhattan. The cause […]

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‘Korean Art From 1953’ Gives a Full View of Modern Art in South Korea

Many rich nations use art, music and movies to project an image to the world, but few take it as seriously as South Korea — today’s uncontested champion of cultural soft power. In the last 20 years, the nation’s singers and actors have thumped to Asian and then worldwide superstardom — signaled in 2012 by […]

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Upheaval Over Race Reaches Met Museum After Curator’s Instagram Post

The turmoil coursing through cultural institutions around the country on the subject of race has made its way to the biggest museum of them all: the Metropolitan Museum of Art. A top curator’s Instagram post that seemed critical of protests over monuments and the Black Lives Matters movement — shared on Juneteenth — has ignited […]

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We Don’t Have to Like Them. We Just Need to Understand Them.

Some sights are so searing that you can’t unsee them. And, like it or not, you end up seeing the world through them. Reality hasn’t changed; you have, which makes you want to change reality. Right now. That pretty much describes the cause-and-effect physics surrounding the release, on May 25, of the cellphone video of […]

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Nine Black Artists and Cultural Leaders on Seeing and Being Seen

“If you’re silent about your pain, they’ll kill you and say you enjoyed it,” wrote Zora Neale Hurston in her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Throughout this country’s history, black Americans have been reminded near daily that this remains true — both literally and more obliquely. In creative fields, for instance, from the […]

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Nine Black Artists and Cultural Leaders on Seeing and Being Seen

“If you’re silent about your pain, they’ll kill you and say you enjoyed it,” wrote Zora Neale Hurston in her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Throughout this country’s history, black Americans have been reminded near daily that this remains true — both literally and more obliquely. In creative fields, for instance, from the […]

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As Museums Get on TikTok, the Uffizi Is an Unlikely Class Clown

LONDON — Last month, the Uffizi Gallery in Florence — long a bastion of tradition — posted a video to its TikTok account featuring Botticelli’s “Spring.” The painting depicts Venus and other mythological figures, and has been gawked at by tourists and studied by academics for centuries. On TikTok, users were treated to a new […]

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A Botched Restoration of a Painting in Spain Draws Outrage

Art restoration experts in Spain called on Tuesday for tighter regulation of their work and condemned reports of a botched restoration of a copy of a Baroque-era painting of the Virgin Mary. A private art collector in Valencia, Spain, paid for the painted copy of “The Immaculate Conception of El Escorial” by the Spanish artist […]

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Facebook, Citing Looting Concerns, Bans Historical Artifact Sales

Responding to criticism that its site has become a bazaar for the sale of looted Middle Eastern antiquities, Facebook said on Tuesday it would remove any content “that attempts to buy, sell or trade in historical artifacts.” The decision came after archaeologists and activists who monitor the illicit antiquities trade said they had identified at […]

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Basketball and Barkley Hendricks: The Lesser Known Work of an Influential Artist

Breaking the rules always came easy to Barkley L. Hendricks. One of the most influential artists and photographers of the 20th century, he was best known for his portrayal of everyday black life in the United States. He often eschewed convention and experimented with shapes and space in his works unlike anyone had before him. […]

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Curators Urge Guggenheim to Fix Culture That ‘Enables Racism’

A letter signed “The Curatorial Department” of the Guggenheim Museum was sent Monday to the institution’s leadership, demanding immediate, wholesale changes to what it described as “an inequitable work environment that enables racism, white supremacy, and other discriminatory practices.” “We write to express collective concern regarding our institution, which is in urgent need of reform,” […]

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Digital Field Trips: Museum Adventures Abound for Kids

Museums have become extraordinarily creative in throwing open their virtual doors to young people still on lockdown. Educators are providing at-home opportunities to emulate renowned artists, go on odysseys to the stars, collaboratively create a picture book on women’s history and even chill out with a skink. Here’s a selection of offerings, many of them […]

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When Luxury Brands Pretend That ‘Protest Art’ Is Enough

Three months ago, when New York government officials ordered nonessential businesses closed to slow the spread of coronavirus, high-end retailers sheathed their stores in plywood barriers, as though readying for civil unrest. Did Louis Vuitton and Coach anticipate this human rights movement catalyzed by the police killing of George Floyd? Probably not. The reflexive impulse […]

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Op-Art: See the Sin

Mass demonstration. Indifference. Slavery. Indifference. Jim Crow. Indifference. My people. Raised fist. Bended knee. Indifference. Just loss. Just pain. Just past. Just murder. Indifference. Loss of breath. Indifference. Loss of life. Indifference. Our pleas. Our hopes. Our demands. Our lives. Indifference. Genocide. Indifference. Mass incarceration. Indifference. Non-violence. Violence. And then indifference. Locked arms. Choked up. […]

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Black Gallerists Press Forward Despite a Market That Holds Them Back

Art Basel’s online viewing rooms went live on Thursday, presenting 281 of the world’s leading modern and contemporary art galleries. Not one of them is owned by an African-American. Despite the increasing attention being paid to black artists — many of whom have been snatched up by mega dealers and seen the prices for their […]

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Museums Embrace Art Therapy Techniques for Unsettled Times

When the instructor asked him to describe his life in two words, Walter Enriquez chose carefully: fear and violence. He had spent decades as a policeman in Peru during the bloodiest days of armed conflict between government forces and guerrilla fighters that killed nearly 70,000 people. But he said that nothing could have prepared him […]

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Elizabeth Alexander on the Spectacle of ‘Black Bodies in Pain’

In 1994, Elizabeth Alexander, poet, scholar, and president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation published “‘Can you be Black and Look at This?’: Reading the Rodney King Video(s).” The essay grieved the beating of Rodney King by four white Los Angeles police officers in 1991. It also grappled with the trauma that African-American viewers, in […]

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Elizabeth Alexander on the Spectacle of ‘Black Bodies in Pain’

In 1994, Elizabeth Alexander, poet, scholar, and president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation published “‘Can you be Black and Look at This?’: Reading the Rodney King Video(s).” The essay grieved the beating of Rodney King by four white Los Angeles police officers in 1991. It also grappled with the trauma that African-American viewers, in […]

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A Long Revered Relic Is Found to Be Europe’s Oldest Surviving Wooden Statue

ROME — For centuries, in a picturesque Tuscan town near the Mediterranean coast, legions of pilgrims came to venerate one of Christendom’s most treasured relics — an eight-foot-tall wooden crucifix known as the “Volto Santo de Lucca.” According to the legend, “The Holy Face of Lucca” had been sculpted by a divine hand and remained […]

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