Tag: Harvard University

Harvard Won a Key Affirmative Action Battle. But the War’s Not Over.

The bitter fight over Harvard’s race-conscious admissions process — and affirmative action nationwide — is far from done. The university won the first round on Tuesday, when a federal judge ruled there was no evidence of explicit bias in Harvard’s treatment of Asian-American applicants. But from the beginning, the plaintiffs suing Harvard were preparing for […]

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That Affirmative Action Ruling Was Good. Its Rationale, Terrible.

On Tuesday, a federal judge, Allison D. Burroughs, upheld Harvard’s use of race-conscious admissions in a legal challenge from Students for Fair Admissions, which claims the school was unfairly denying Asian-American students in favor of less qualified candidates in violation of the Civil Rights Act. As soon as the lawsuit made news, it set off […]

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5 Takeaways From the Harvard Ruling

In one of the most closely watched lawsuits concerning affirmative action and higher education, a federal judge on Tuesday ruled that Harvard could continue considering race in its admissions process in pursuit of a diverse class. The plaintiffs, Students for Fair Admissions, made four claims: that Harvard had intentionally discriminated against Asian-Americans, used race as […]

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Harvard Does Not Discriminate Against Asian-Americans in Admissions, Judge Rules

A federal judge on Tuesday rejected claims that Harvard had discriminated against Asian-Americans in admissions, saying that the university had a right to choose a diverse class. The challenge to the university’s admissions process came from a group hoping to overturn a longstanding Supreme Court precedent that allows race to be considered as one factor […]

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The College Admissions Trilemma

For decades America’s universities have made extensive efforts to achieve racial diversity within their student bodies. The official justifications for these efforts have changed depending on political currents and Supreme Court whims: What began as explicit redress for African-Americans eventually morphed into a commitment to diversity as an educational good unto itself. But the implicit […]

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End Legacy College Admissions

For nearly a century, many American college and university admissions officers have given preferential treatment to the children of alumni. The policies originated in the 1920s, coinciding with an influx of Jewish and Catholic applicants to the country’s top schools. They continue today, placing a thumb on the scale in favor of students who already […]

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Palestinian Harvard Student Blocked From Coming to U.S. Is Allowed to Enter

Ismail Ajjawi, a Palestinian student denied entry to the United States last month at the airport in Boston, was allowed to enter the country on Monday and was at Harvard in time for the beginning of classes, according to Amideast, the group that sponsored him. Amideast said in a statement that the United States Embassy […]

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Where Does Affirmative Action Leave Asian-Americans?

For the purposes of this article, Alex Chen, an 18-year-old senior at the Bronx High School of Science in New York City, is the “typical Asian student.” Alex has a 98 percent average at one of the city’s elite public high schools, scored a 1,580 on the SAT and, as far as he knows, has […]

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The Remarkable Life of the First Woman on the Harvard Faculty

In late August 1919, 50-year-old Alice Hamilton was sitting onboard a steamship typing quickly on a borrowed Corona typewriter, oblivious to the approaching New York skyline as she finished her return trip from Europe. She wanted to record the searing images she had just seen during an extended tour behind former enemy lines with her […]

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Harvard Freshman Says He Was Barred From U.S. Over His Friends’ Social Media Posts

A Palestinian student from Lebanon who was set to begin his freshman year at Harvard was denied entry to the United States after immigration officials objected to his friends’ social media posts, he said this week, prompting furor among free-speech advocates. The student, Ismail B. Ajjawi, 17, landed at Logan International Airport in Boston on […]

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The Mystery of the Himalayas’ Skeleton Lake Just Got Weirder

Nestled in the Indian Himalayas, some 16,500 feet above sea level, sits Roopkund Lake. One hundred and thirty feet wide, it is frozen for much of the year, a frosty pond in a lonely, snowbound valley. But on warmer days, it delivers a macabre performance, as hundreds of human skeletons, some with flesh still attached, […]

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An Archaeological Puzzle on the Danube

LEPENSKI VIR, Serbia — The faces are haunting. About 8,000 years ago, over a period of perhaps 200 years, artists that lived in this settlement on the banks of the Danube carved about 100 sandstone boulders with faces and abstract designs. The faces are simple, with wide round eyes, a stylized nose and down-turned open […]

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Would You Want a Computer to Judge Your Risk of H.I.V. Infection?

ImageCreditJames Steinberg A few years ago, researchers at Harvard and Kaiser Permanente Northern California had an inspired idea: Perhaps they could use the wealth of personal data in electronic health records to identify patients at high risk of getting infected with H.I.V. Doctors could use an algorithm to pinpoint these patients and then steer them […]

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Pete Buttigieg’s Life in the Closet

The closet that Pete Buttigieg built for himself in the late 1990s and 2000s was a lot like the ones that other gay men of his age and ambition hid inside. He dated women, deepened his voice and furtively looked at MySpace and Friendster profiles of guys who had come out — all while wondering […]

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Harvard Suspends Roland Fryer, Star Economist, After Sexual Harassment Claims

Roland G. Fryer, a onetime rising star in economics who has been accused by multiple women of sexual harassment, will lose his Harvard University research lab and be suspended for two years, the university said Wednesday. Harvard’s actions represent a remarkable fall from grace for an economist who until recently was among the profession’s most […]

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Rick Snyder, Ex-Michigan Governor, Withdraws From Harvard Post Over Flint Uproar

Rick Snyder, a former governor of Michigan, removed himself from an upcoming fellowship at the Harvard Kennedy School amid a backlash over his role in a water contamination crisis in one the nation’s most impoverished cities. The choice of Mr. Snyder as a fellow by the prestigious school of government inflamed Mr. Snyder’s critics after […]

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Why Is There So Much Saudi Money in American Universities?

One spring afternoon last year, protesters gathered on a sidewalk alongside a busy street in Cambridge, Mass. City buses rolled past. Car horns sounded. A few pedestrians paused briefly before continuing on their way. The location was 77 Massachusetts Avenue, in front of a limestone-and-concrete edifice that serves as the gateway into the Massachusetts Institute […]

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Unleashed, Robo-Insect Takes Flight

For years now, scientists have sought to build aerial robots inspired by bees and other flying insects. But they have always run into a fundamental problem: Flying takes a lot of energy. Insects flap their wings, generating the thrust needed to move through the air by utilizing the energy stored in strong muscles. Their robot […]

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