Tag: Harvard University

Fixes: Closing the Racial Wealth Gap

First of three articles. In her 2018 book, “Give People Money,” the journalist Annie Lowrey delivered a stinging criticism of the ways in which the United States has essentially won the race to the bottom when it comes to distribution of wealth: “We tolerate levels of poverty that are grotesque and entirely unique among developed […]

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Fixes: For Refugee Children, Reading Helps Heal Trauma

As the war in Syria has uprooted lives by the millions, humanitarian organizations have worked to supply food, shelter and medical relief. These services are a lifeline for millions, and it’s a herculean task to fulfill them on the scale that refugee crises demand. But humanitarian workers are also now doing more to address the […]

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Pete Buttigieg’s Focus: Storytelling First. Policy Details Later.

The question was simple enough, but Senator John Edwards squirmed painfully. For 49 long seconds, the North Carolina Democrat, a masterful courtroom orator, sputtered before a crowd at Harvard, unable to settle on a favorite movie. Taunted by the MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews, who accused him of scrambling political calculations in his head, Mr. Edwards […]

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Doctors Use Electrical Implant to Aid Brain-Damaged Woman

More than 3 million Americans live with disabling brain injuries. The vast majority of these individuals are lost to the medical system soon after their initial treatment, to be cared for by family or to fend for themselves, managing fatigue, attention and concentration problems with little hope of improvement. On Saturday, a team of scientists […]

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Harvard Is Investigating Fencing Coach for Sale of Home to Prospective Student’s Father

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Harvard is investigating its longtime fencing coach after learning that he sold his house for a vastly inflated price to the father of a current student, shortly before the student was admitted. The inquiry into the coach, Peter Brand, comes as universities around the country are scrambling to respond to a sweeping […]

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Your Ancestors Were Slaves. Who Owns the Photos of Them?

The haunting daguerreotypes of seven enslaved men and women taken in South Carolina in 1850 have long been an awkward matter at Harvard. Made in a portrait studio at the request of Louis Agassiz, a renowned Harvard biologist out to prove the inferiority of people of African descent, the images have been the subject of […]

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Chop Up a Worm. It Will Regenerate. Scientists Figured Out Why.

An essential rite of passage for many an otherwise nonviolent child involves cutting an earthworm down the middle and watching as the two halves squirm. One half — the one with the brain — will typically grow into a full worm. Scientists have now identified the master control gene responsible for that regrowth in one […]

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Harvard Accused of ‘Shamelessly’ Profiting From Slavery Photos

Photo: John Shishmanian (Associated Press) Harvard University has been accused of “shamelessly” profiting from photos featuring 19th-century slaves, all while ignoring repeated requests to turn over the photos in question to the descendants of those pictured. As such, a lawsuit was filed on Wednesday. According to USA Today, the school is being sued by Norwich, […]

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Who Should Own Photos of Slaves? The Descendants, not Harvard, a Lawsuit Says

NORWICH, Conn. — The two slaves, a father and daughter, were stripped to the waist and positioned for frontal and side views. Then, like subjects in contemporary mug shots, their pictures were taken, as part of a racist study arguing that black people were an inferior race. Little did they know that 169 years later, […]

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DealBook: How Executives Vote With Their Wallets

The Business Roundtable, the top lobbying organization for industry in Washington, is often characterized as a nonpartisan or bipartisan organization. It represents more than 200 large companies — from oil giants to tech sweethearts — with more than $7 trillion of revenue and more than 15 million workers of all political stripes. But nobody is […]

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The Scandals of Meritocracy

In the last year elite college admissions has been touched by three different but related scandals. The newest one is also the most entertaining, because it includes pretend water polo players, staged standardized tests and outright bribery, all to help desperate rich people and TV stars buy their progeny into a top-flight school. The other […]

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Matter: A History of the Iberian Peninsula, as Told by Its Skeletons

For thousands of years, the Iberian Peninsula — home now to Spain and Portugal — has served as a crossroads. Phoenicians from the Near East built trading ports there 3,000 years ago, and Romans conquered the region around 200 B.C. Muslim armies sailed from North Africa and took control of Iberia in the 8th century […]

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‘Whose Side Are You On?’: Harvard Professor Representing Weinstein Hit With Graffiti, Campus Criticism

The graffiti showed up on the door of a Harvard University building last week: “Our rage is self-defense,” and “Whose side are you on?” The unexpected target was Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., the director of Harvard’s criminal-law clinic and the first African-American to be appointed as a faculty dean. Earlier this year, Mr. Sullivan joined […]

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I’m Asian-American. Affirmative Action Worked for Me.

I am a first-generation Korean-American and I’m frustrated by the lawsuit against Harvard, in which the judge will hear closing arguments on Wednesday. The plaintiffs claim that the college should end its very modest consideration of race in admissions. They wrongly assume that Asian-Americans cannot benefit from affirmative action. That wasn’t true for me. I […]

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A High-Tech Pill to End Drug Injections

Here was the challenge for bioengineers: Find a way to for patients to take drugs — like insulin or monoclonal antibodies used to treat cancers and other diseases — without injections. The medicines are made of molecules too big to be absorbed through the stomach or intestines; in any event, the drugs would be quickly […]

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When College Rapists Graduate

As a student at Harvard, I reported a sexual assault by a classmate to the university. After a six-month investigation that ended after I graduated, I received a decision from the administrative board. The board voted to “scratch,” a term defined in the administrative board’s handbook. “Nothing wrong occurred,” it reads. “There are no grounds […]

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These Patients Had Sickle-Cell Disease. Experimental Therapies Might Have Cured Them.

Scientists have long known what causes sickle-cell disease and its devastating effects: a single mutation in one errant gene. But for decades, there has been only modest progress against an inherited condition that mainly afflicts people of African descent. With advances in gene therapy, that is quickly changing — so much so that scientists have […]

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Your Loyalties Are Your Life

In 1900, there were two great philosophers working side by side at Harvard, William James and Josiah Royce. James was from an eminent Boston family and had all the grace, brilliance and sophistication that his class aspired to. Royce, as the historian Allen Guelzo points out, was the first major American philosopher born west of […]

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The New Old Age: Hospitals Stopped Readmitting So Many Medicare Patients. Did That Cost Lives?

ImageCreditCraig Frazier It was a well-intended policy. Almost all parties agree on that much. A decade ago, when Medicare beneficiaries were discharged from hospitals, one in five returned within a month. Older people faced the risks of hospitalization all over again: infections, deconditioning, delirium, subsequent nursing home stays. And preventable readmissions were costing Medicare a […]

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Is Ancient DNA Research Revealing New Truths — or Falling Into Old Traps?

PART I 1. The Ghosts of Teouma A faint aura of destiny seems to hover over Teouma Bay. It’s not so much the landscape, with its ravishing if boilerplate tropical splendor — banana and mango trees, coconut and pandanus palms, bougainvillea, the apprehensive trill of the gray-eared honeyeater — as it is the shape of […]

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