Tag: Poetry and Poets

A Poet Whose Calling Is Doubt Celebrates Language’s Uncertainty

MUDDY MATTERHORNPoems 2009-2019By Heather McHugh With its irreverence for what’s trending, Heather McHugh’s work fits into a longstanding tradition in American poetry, the tradition of not pledging allegiance to any particular aesthetic flag. Her nonconformist style tempts critics to place her in categories where she doesn’t belong — she’s no dull neo-formalist, though she takes […]

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The Poems That Poets Turn To in a Time of Strife

Even as much of the world is still reeling from the coronavirus pandemic, people across the United States have taken to the streets, calling for racial justice and an end to police brutality. We asked 16 poets, including Rita Dove, Kwame Alexander, Joy Harjo and Arthur Sze, about the poets and poetry they’re reading in […]

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A Poet of Found Language Who Finds Her Language in Archives

CONCORDANCE By Susan Howe “One must cross the threshold heart of words,” Susan Howe writes early in her new book, “Concordance,” an appealingly jagged sequence of collage poems. The “threshold heart,” for Howe, is a kind of echo chamber where sound dazzles the inner ear and resonance dances with meaning. To invite us into this […]

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: America’s No. 1 Literary Celebrity

CROSS OF SNOW A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow By Nicholas A. Basbanes Literary reputations are seldom secure, and with the passing of time tend to sink rather than rise. Even so, the case of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow seems extreme. At his death, in 1882, he wasn’t just the most famous poet in America but […]

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Before the Feminist Revolution, This ‘Messy Experiment’ Nurtured Female Talent

THE EQUIVALENTS A Story of Art, Female Friendship, and Liberation in the 1960sBy Maggie Doherty In the age of fourth-wave feminism, intersectionality and #MeToo, it’s easy to forget how recently acute gender imbalance seemed all but intractable. Milestones of feminism’s second wave — the publication of seminal books like Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” (1963), […]

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Three Poets on Marriage and Female Identity

“Names have a lot of meaning, but I also think that you can create meaning.” — Denice Frohman, a poet and organizer of #PoetsforPuertoRico In Her Words is available as a newsletter. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox. What does marriage mean for a woman’s identity? And more specifically, what does […]

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Follow the Silk Road, Book by Book

Compiled by our contributors, a reading list for recreating the ancient trade route from the comfort of home. ImageAn illustrated detail from the Catalan Atlas (circa 1375) depicting Marco Polo’s caravan traveling along the Silk Road.Credit…© Bibliothèque Nationale de France /HIP/Alamy May 11, 2020 This year, T’s spring Travel issue is devoted to just five stories, each […]

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Prince and the Revolution: Livestreaming Today

Here are a few of the best events happening on Thursday and how to tune in (all times are Eastern). Travel Back in Time With Prince and the Revolution 9 p.m. on YouTube The Prince estate, in partnership with YouTube, is hosting a watch party of “Prince and the Revolution: Live,” the renowned concert captured […]

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A Poetic Journey Through Western China

Image For years, Silk Road travelers made the grueling trek past towering mountain ranges and ancient cities now lost to time. Centuries later, one writer attempts to retrace the journey. A temple on Crescent Lake at Mingsha Shan (Echoing Sand Mountain) near the town of Dunhuang in Gansu, China. Dunhuang was an important strategic base […]

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On Subways as Riders Return: Odes to Their Resilience

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will use many tools in coming weeks in its effort to restore faith in a subway system that has been seen as a vector for infection. But the agency, it seems, will also employ poetry. The people who pick the verse routinely displayed inside subway cars as part of the “Poetry […]

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Joy Harjo Is Named U.S. Poet Laureate for a Second Term

Joy Harjo has been appointed to a second term as the nation’s poet laureate, the Library of Congress announced on Thursday. During her first year in the role, Harjo focused on expanding her digital presence, connecting with other Native poets and highlighting the intersection between music and poetry. “That synergy was something that we wanted […]

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A Dark Debut Propels a Dutch Writer to Reluctant Fame

Marieke Lucas Rijneveld is an author who confides in their reader, rather than family or friends. “I am a private person,” the writer, who identifies as male and uses the pronouns they and them, said on a recent video call from their home in Utrecht, the Netherlands. “I wake up early every day and, after […]

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What Do Letters Reveal About the Creative Mind?

“LETTERS ARE ABOVE all useful as a means of expressing the ideal self; and no other method of communication is quite so good for this purpose,” wrote the novelist and critic Elizabeth Hardwick in a 1953 essay about literary correspondence. “In conversation, those uneasy eyes upon you, those lips ready with an emendation before you […]

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The Coronavirus Plague Season, Through the Eyes of Writers

article strong { text-transform: uppercase; font-size: 12px; font-weight: 500 !important; display: block; font-family: nyt-franklin; letter-spacing: 0.5px; margin-bottom: 35px; } article p { margin-bottom: 0 !important; text-align: center; } p.css-jwz2nf.etfikam0 { text-align: left; margin: 0 20px 1rem !important; } It was an uncertain spring. — Virginia Woolf, “The Years” Some days felt longer than other days. […]

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What I Miss During the Coronavirus Pandemic? Swimming.

It’s on the opening pages of “Moby-Dick.” “Yes, as everyone knows,” Ishmael declares, “meditation and water are wedded forever.” He calls our attention to the crowds of dreamy water gazers gathered along the shores of Manhattan on a Sabbath afternoon. They prove him right: The ocean’s liquid fingers have a way of transfixing us in […]

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In ‘Three Poems,’ Hannah Sullivan Writes Beautifully and Covers a Lot of Ground

There are a lot of things you can say about “You, Very Young in New York,” the cosmopolitan poem that opens “Three Poems,” Hannah Sullivan’s first collection. It’s great cocktail-bar (and dive-bar) verse. Her narrator drinks pisco sours and gin and small-batch Mezcal. In one bar, she reports, in a tone that’s rapt yet underpinned […]

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What Can We Learn From the Art of Pandemics Past?

When the pandemic hit, we began gathering around the hearths of our screens, for news, or in solidarity with friends and family, for the cold solace of a cocktail-hour booze-Zoom, even for preschool, the grid of domestic scenes and small, hopeful faces meant to relieve us of our isolation somehow only succeeding in reinforcing it. […]

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‘I Didn’t Know Whether to Mourn or to Celebrate’: An Afghan Reporter’s Girlhood Education

Times Insider explains who we are and what we do, and delivers behind-the-scenes insights into how our journalism comes together. KABUL, Afghanistan — Last spring I visited the Rustam School in a remote corner of the Yakawlang District in central Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Province. While the country’s longest war was continuing to destroy lives in other […]

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When the World Stops, Traveling in John Keats’s ‘Realms of Gold’

In October of 1820, typhus raged in Naples. With his artist friend, Joseph Severn, the British poet John Keats rocked in the city’s harbor for 10 days, not nearly the quaranta giorni — 40 days — that give us our word quarantine. Before this journey, Keats always felt intense melancholy. In “On Seeing the Elgin […]

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A Boston E.R. Doctor’s Poem About the Coronavirus

Dr. Elizabeth Mitchell had just come off back-to-back work shifts in the emergency room at Boston Medical Center last week and was not sure how to think about what she had experienced. In almost three decades as an emergency physician, she, like her colleagues, was used to feeling invincible. She had regularly treated patients facing […]

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Molly Brodak, Poet and Memoirist of Her Father’s Crimes, Dies at 39

Molly Brodak, a poet who chronicled the trauma she experienced as the child of a compulsive liar and bank robber in a critically acclaimed memoir, died on March 8 near her home in Atlanta. She was 39. Her husband, Blake Butler, said the cause was suicide and that Ms. Brodak had a history of depression […]

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Special Episode: A Bit of Relief

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device:Via Apple Podcasts | Via Spotify | Via Stitcher We’re in a moment that feels scary, uncertain and unsettling, and may feel this way for a while. While we’ll continue to cover the coronavirus pandemic until it’s over, we realize that this time requires more than news […]

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