Tag: Poetry and Poets

‘For Colored Girls’ Is a Choreopoem. What’s a Choreopoem?

“For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf” is not a play. Or that’s not what the breakthrough work was called by its author, Ntozake Shange. Her word was “choreopoem,” and any production of “For Colored Girls,” like the major revival now in previews at the Public Theater, has to figure out […]

Read More

George the Poet Is Pushing Podcasting’s Limits

LONDON — Close your eyes, and listen. “The play button is a teleportation device,” says a voice in your headphones, “that allows you to enter another world while physically staying where you are.” Strings and electronic blips whirl around in the background. The next 19 minutes are a spoken-word journey, combining poetry, recorded phone calls, […]

Read More

Colson Whitehead, Marlon James in Running for National Book Awards

Colson Whitehead’s novel “The Nickel Boys,” based on the horrific history of a Florida reform school, was nominated for the National Book Award for fiction on Friday, three years after the writer won the prize for his book “The Underground Railroad.” He was the only author in the fiction category to have been previously nominated […]

Read More

In the Salary Race, Engineers Sprint but English Majors Endure

For students chasing lasting wealth, the best choice of a college major is less obvious than you might think. The conventional wisdom is that computer science and engineering majors have better employment prospects and higher earnings than their peers who choose liberal arts. This is true for the first job, but the long-term story is […]

Read More

A Rebel French Poet Draws New Followers to the Hometown He Hated

CHARLEVILLE-MÉZIÈRES, France — When Bernard Colin took over as caretaker of this city’s cemetery 27 years ago, his predecessor gave him some remarkably non-prescient advice: “Don’t worry, you won’t be bothered by the grave of Arthur Rimbaud — no one visits it.” Now 60, Mr. Colin collects a few letters every week, from as far […]

Read More

What They Left Behind: Toons, the Snurfer and ‘Macho Man’

Obituaries in The New York Times give account of the lives of the people around us — what they accomplished and how they lived — and reading them can be an exercise in discovering, or rediscovering, the marvelous things they left behind. Here is a sampling of such legacies from recent weeks. A World of […]

Read More

‘Huddled Masses’ in Statue of Liberty Poem Are European, Trump Official Says

Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, one of the Trump administration’s top immigration officials, set off a controversy this week with comments about “The New Colossus,” the 136-year-old sonnet at the base of the Statue of Liberty. “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” reads the poem, by Emma Lazarus. But […]

Read More

What the Trump Administration Gets Wrong About the Statue of Liberty

It has happened again. August rolls around and a new, harsher set of immigration restrictions emerges from the White House. Two years ago, President Trump’s senior adviser Stephen Miller rolled out the points-based RAISE Act, which would reduce legal immigration by as much as 50 percent over a decade. Two days ago, the acting Citizenship […]

Read More

From the Country’s New Poet Laureate, Poems Reclaiming Tribal Culture

AN AMERICAN SUNRISEPoemsBy Joy Harjo In June, after decades as a significant presence for poetry readers, Joy Harjo was named United States poet laureate. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, she’s the first indigenous poet to hold the post. This is overdue, and political: a reminder to those who view America as a white […]

Read More

Maya Angelou, Reimagined Through Art

More than two dozen artists honored the poet, artist and activist with murals at the Los Angeles high school that bears her name. Our photographer captured the works being created. By Carlos Gonzalez and Amanda Svachula A Shepard Fairey mural of Maya Angelou, mid-laugh in the sunshine, now sweeps across an exterior wall of a […]

Read More

Marie Ponsot, Prolific Poet of Love, Divorce and Family, Dies at 98

After a promising start as a published poet in the 1950s, Marie Ponsot put her career aside. She was a single mother in New York City, with seven children to raise. But she did not stop writing. She filled notebooks with her poems — and then stashed much of her work in a drawer, showing […]

Read More

Writing With Your Eyes Closed

Joel Burcat’s debut novel, “Drink to Every Beast,” isn’t climbing best-seller lists or getting attention from prominent critics. But it’s remarkable for a different reason. He finished it after he became legally blind. An environmental lawyer in Harrisburg, Pa., Burcat, 64, had been writing in his spare time for many years and had cranked out […]

Read More

‘The Real Debate Is Will They All Fit on a Stage? Dems a Lot of Folks’

As pundits prepped to dissect the first debate of the 2020 election, Jason O. Gilbert, a comedy writer, poked fun at the pageant with a haiku roast of the Democratic candidates. The Opinion staff offered a challenge to readers: “Think you can do better?” The result was a mix of haikus and other wordplay — […]

Read More

Joy Harjo Is Named U.S. Poet Laureate

Joy Harjo started writing as a college student in New Mexico in the early 1970s, during what she described as “the beginning of a multicultural literary movement.” At gatherings around the Southwest, she began meeting poets, including Native American ones. Hearing them perform made her realize that poetry was available to everyone, including her. “It […]

Read More