Tag: Elderly

We Can Help Men Live Longer

All over the country, men are dying. Every kind of man: rich and poor, blue collar and white collar, men of all races, religions and ethnicities. In addition to sex, these dying Americans share another trait: They are no longer young. How can it be that men by the millions are dying while their female […]

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Instead of a Generational Culture War, Let’s Fight the Rich

Generations are pretty bogus. The labels we use to casually slice up society — boomer, millennial, Gen X, Gen Z — are a nearly useless way of thinking about politics, culture or business in America. The very idea that tens of millions of people across different classes and races and geographies might hold similar views […]

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How to (Gently) Help Your Aging Parents Manage Their Money

When Reagan Alonso, a semiretired nurse living in Jacksonville, Fla., first gently offered to help her aging mother with her finances, she encountered resistance. Her mother, now 88, was born in Ohio, and “being from the Midwest and of that generation, we’re very much, ‘you don’t talk about money,’” Ms. Alonso, 60, said. “When it […]

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The Right Kind of Exercise May Boost Memory and Lower Dementia Risk

Being physically fit may sharpen the memory and lower our risk of dementia, even if we do not start exercising until we are middle-aged or older, according to two stirring new studies of the interplay between exercise, aging, aerobic fitness and forgetting. But both studies, while underscoring the importance of activity for brain health, also […]

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Your Uber Driver Is ‘Retired’? You Shouldn’t Be Surprised

Dave Zarrow, who lives in Reston, Va., figures he spends about 20 hours a week in his 2017 Camry driving for Uber, the ride-hailing company. A former small business owner who segued into teaching, he and his wife have left their full-time jobs and could comfortably retire. Even without the $15 to $20 an hour […]

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A 67-Year-Old Inmate Died in a Struggle With Guards. What Happened?

After spending nearly a quarter-century behind bars, John McMillon was counting down to the day that he would be eligible to be released on parole. “I’m going home,” a fellow inmate recalled him saying. Mr. McMillon suffered from mental illness and had had disciplinary problems over the years. He was punished for assaulting a guard […]

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To Treat Chronic Ailments, Fix Diet First

On the kitchen counter in her Leimert Park apartment in Los Angeles, Diane Henry lays out her meals for the week. They’re frozen, in equal-sized containers: Florentine tart, noodles with carrots, oven-fried chicken with brown rice and carrots, and Moroccan chicken. She didn’t choose the menu, but she does get a few options. Generally she’s […]

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Steps to Prevent Dementia May Mean Taking Actual Steps

ImageA study found that participants who were more physically active also had more social contact and engaged in more cognitive activities.CreditJacqueline Dormer/Republican-Herald, via Associated Press To ward off age-related cognitive decline, you may be tempted to turn to brain training apps. Last year, consumers spent nearly $2 billion on them, some of which claim to […]

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Taking Ayahuasca When You’re a Senior Citizen

At 74, the venture capitalist George Sarlo might not have seemed an obvious candidate for an ayahuasca experience. Mr. Sarlo, a Hungarian Jewish immigrant who arrived in the United States in 1956, has had great professional success as the co-founder of Walden Venture Capital. He lives in an upscale San Francisco neighborhood, in a large […]

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Taking Care of Me: Getting Help for Depression and Burnout After Years of Caregiving

The terrible sense of drowning began several months after my mother’s death — though I really started losing her seven years before she died. Vascular dementia had changed her personality, making her angry, paranoid, and fearful. The close relationship we’d once enjoyed began to unravel as her disease progressed. By the time Mom died, she […]

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Rx for Doctors: Stop With the Urine Tests

It’s such a common routine in a doctor’s office or clinic or hospital that patients tend to comply without thinking: Step on the scale, roll up your sleeve for the blood pressure cuff, urinate into a cup. But that last request should prompt questions, at the least. The urine test is the first step into […]

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Potential Mental Health Benefits of Living to Age 100

Taking Things in Stride The older I get, the less likely I am to be bothered by the little things. There are complex problems in the world, granted, yet I’m blessed with the ability to recognize that I will do what I can and make a positive contribution without falling into a negative state over […]

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Medicare Shopping Season Is Almost Here

If you’re enrolled in Medicare but worry about the cost of health care, your chance to do something about it is right around the corner. Most people enroll in Medicare when they become eligible at age 65. But every fall, they have the opportunity to change their coverage during an enrollment season that runs from […]

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Older People Are Ignored and Distorted in Ageist Marketing, Report Finds

Older consumers, who hold trillions of dollars in spending power and make up a growing portion of the global population, would seem to be a prime target for advertisers. Instead, the demographic is shunned and caricatured in marketing images, perpetuating unrealistic stereotypes and contributing to age discrimination, according to a new report. More than a […]

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Taking Up Running After 50? It’s Never Too Late to Shine

Men and women who start running competitively when they are in their 50s can be as swift, lean and well-muscled within a decade as competitive older runners who have trained lifelong, according to a buoying new study of the physiques and performances of a large group of older athletes. The findings suggest that middle age […]

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For Older Patients, an ‘Afterworld’ of Hospital Care

The Hospital for Special Care in New Britain, Conn., had 10 patients in its close observation unit on a recent afternoon. Visitors could hear the steady ping of pulse monitors and the hum of ventilators. The hospital carefully designed these curtained cubicles to include windows, so that patients can distinguish day from night. It also […]

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