Tag: Global Warming

World Bank Leader, Accused of Climate Denial, Offers a New Response

The president of the World Bank, David Malpass, on Thursday tried to restate his views on climate change amid widespread calls for his dismissal after he refused to acknowledge that the burning of fossil fuels is rapidly warming the planet. In an interview on CNN International on Thursday morning, Mr. Malpass said he accepted the […]

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The Tonga Volcano Shook the World. It May Also Affect the Climate.

The eruption of an underwater volcano in the Pacific Ocean in January that was so large it produced a global shock wave also spewed huge amounts of water vapor into the upper atmosphere, where it may cause a small, short-term spike in global warming, scientists said Thursday. The injection of what the researchers estimated was […]

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Europe’s Shrinking Waterways Reveal Treasures, and Experts Are Worried

LONDON — Rusted chunks of metal from an old pickup truck disintegrate in the sun. Its windows, tires and interior are long gone, and so are any operable parts. It sits against a collection of hollowed-out homes and derelict buildings, all ruins of Aceredo, a former village in northwest Spain that was submerged three decades […]

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Biden Paints Russia as a Threat to the World in U.N. Speech

President Biden used his first speech at the United Nations since the invasion of Ukraine to accuse one man, President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, of seeking to “erase” another nation from the map and of trying to drag the world back to an era of nuclear confrontation. Hours after Mr. Putin mobilized reservists for […]

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Joe Manchin’s Pipeline Deal Irks Both Parties, Snarling Spending Bill

WASHINGTON — When Senator Joe Manchin III of West Virginia agreed in late July to supply his crucial vote allowing Democrats to pass their landmark climate change, health and tax legislation, he extracted a promise in return: Congress would pass a separate bill by the end of September making it easier to build a natural […]

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Senate Ratifies Kigali Amendment, the Global Pact to Curb Hydrofluorocarbons

WASHINGTON — The Senate voted on Wednesday to approve an international climate treaty for the first time in 30 years, agreeing in a rare bipartisan deal to phase out of the use of planet-warming industrial chemicals commonly found in refrigerators and air-conditioners. By a vote of 69 to 27 the United States joined the 2016 […]

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Are There Better Places to Put Large Solar Farms Than These Forests?

Still, there’s plenty of space for those panels, even in a future in which most or all of our electricity comes from clean sources, and in which widespread deployment of electric cars and heat pumps ratchets up demand for electricity. Several independent estimates suggest the country could power itself with roughly the acreage currently dedicated […]

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We’re Losing the Luxury of a Summer Spent Outdoors

On Labor Day, my husband and I stood at the sliding glass door to our hotel room balcony, staring out at smoky skies. We were at Lake Chelan in Washington, on our first big post-pandemic vacation, with our 3-year-old and 6-week-old baby. Overnight, the wind had brought wildfire smoke from fires in Idaho and Montana. […]

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Lots of Food Gets Tossed. These Food-Waste Apps Let You Buy It, Cheap.

In Hammond, Ind., Jerry Wash, a retired railroad ticket agent, said he regularly looked to see what’s available at his local Meijer. “We wake up in the morning, you know, most people are checking their social media,” he said. “We’re checking Flashfood.” Mr. Wash said he and his wife, Jody, didn’t shop at the regular […]

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Patagonia’s ‘Do Boy’ Does Good

Yvon Chouinard still possesses, in the proud parlance of the climbing community, the “dirtbag” sensibility. In the 1960s, he lived to climb and made do selling handmade climbing gear so he could devote himself to the mountains. Even today, at the age of 83, when he visits my wife and me in our New York […]

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Who gets to use gas?

According to the International Energy Agency, 600 million people in Africa lack access to electricity, and 970 million live without low-pollution cooking fuels, which consigns mostly women and girls to burning charcoal and wood in their kitchens. More shocking, a smaller share of the population has access to electricity today than in 2019, before the […]

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The Single Best Guide to Decarbonization I’ve Heard

Produced by ‘The Ezra Klein Show’ In August, Joe Biden signed into law the Inflation Reduction Act, which included $392 billion towards a new climate budget — the single largest investment in emissions reduction in U.S. history. The CHIPS and Science Act and the Bipartisan Infrastructure Act bring that number up to around $450 billion. […]

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Billions in Climate Deal Funding Could Help Protect U.S. Coastal Cities

NEWPORT BAY, Calif. — Claire Arre, a marine biologist, waded through the sand in search of an Olympia oyster on a recent sunny afternoon, monitoring the bed her organization had built to clean up the surrounding watershed and contemplating all that could be done if she could get her hands on federal funding to expand […]

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How a Quebec Lithium Mine May Help Make Electric Cars Affordable

About 350 miles northwest of Montreal, amid a vast pine forest, is a deep mining pit with walls of mottled rock. The pit has changed hands repeatedly and been mired in bankruptcy, but now it could help determine the future of electric vehicles. The mine contains lithium, an indispensable ingredient in electric car batteries that […]

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Three Reasons Puerto Rico Is in the Dark

More than a million people in Puerto Rico were without power on Monday, and many were without running water, after Hurricane Fiona dropped 30 inches of rain on the mountainous island, causing widespread damage to homes and infrastructure. President Biden authorized the Federal Emergency Management Agency to mobilize and coordinate aid. Gov. Pedro Pierluisi told […]

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Gina McCarthy: Businesses No Longer See Climate Action as Driving Job Losses

Then, we secured the historic Inflation Reduction Act — the most aggressive action on climate in U.S. history. When President Barack Obama took office, there were 500 charging stations nationwide. Now, thanks to President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, we plan to install 500,000 chargers across the country. Every major automaker signed on to the president’s […]

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Are Geotubes the Answer to Nantucket’s Climate Change Threat?

The homeowners may have won the first round, but as the years dragged on, Mr. Posner said, he and his neighbors were becoming increasingly frustrated that they hadn’t received approval to expand the project. Opponents of the project said they had the photos to prove the geotubes were causing erosion on other Nantucket beaches, despite […]

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A Sneaky Form of Climate Obstruction Hurts Pension Funds

In several Republican-led states, the officials who oversee pension funds for millions of state workers are being told, or may soon be told, to ignore the financial risks associated with a warming world. There’s something distinctly anti-free market about policymakers limiting investment professionals’ choices — and it’s putting the retirement savings of millions at risk. […]

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The climate philanthropists

Yvon Chouinard, the founder of Patagonia, on Wednesday revealed that he and his family had given away the company and that all future profits from the apparel maker would go toward fighting the climate crisis. It’s a groundbreaking act of philanthropy. In voluntarily forfeiting all their shares in Patagonia, which is valued at more than […]

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The Promise and Pitfalls of Deep-Sea Mining

Eric Lipton contributed reporting. The Daily is made by Lisa Tobin, Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Dan Powell, Dave Shaw, Sydney Harper, Robert Jimison, Mike Benoist, […]

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How Far Should We Go to Save a Species?

If we want to maintain a livable Earth, we must prepare radical measures to safeguard biodiversity. And we will need to grapple with some queasiness about extending humankind’s manipulation of “natural” systems, when our track record as stewards is so poor. We should proceed with extreme caution. As genetics and other biosciences race ahead, they […]

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At Old Coal Mines, the American Chestnut Tries for a Comeback

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ohio — Michael French trudged through a thicket of prickly bramble, unfazed by the branches he had to swat away on occasion in order to arrive at a quiet spot of hilly land that was once mined for coal. Now, however, it is patched with flowering goldenrods and long yellow-green grasses and dotted […]

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Nuclear Power Still Doesn’t Make Much Sense

“The best way to become good at building nuclear power plants is to build nuclear power plants,” said Sama Bilbao y Léon, the director general of the World Nuclear Association. John Kotek, an executive at the Nuclear Energy Institute, the industry’s American trade group, pointed out that the U.S. Navy builds nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft […]

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In ‘Cancer Alley,’ Judge Blocks Huge Petrochemical Plant

Louisiana activists battling to block an enormous plastics plant in a corridor so dense with industrial refineries it is known as Cancer Alley won a legal victory this week when a judge canceled the company’s air permits. In a sharply worded opinion released Wednesday, Judge Trudy White of Louisiana’s 19th Judicial District in Baton Rouge […]

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In a First Study of Pakistan’s Floods, Scientists See Climate Change at Work

Pakistan began receiving abnormally heavy rain in mid-June, and, by late August, drenching downpours were declared a national emergency. The southern part of the Indus River, which traverses the length of the country, became a vast lake. Villages have become islands, surrounded by putrid water that stretches to the horizon. More than 1,500 people have […]

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Solar Energy Is Helping Schools Make Ends Meet

About 30 other school districts in the area have since adopted solar, he said. Tish Tablan, program director at Generation180, said the normalization of solar was especially potent when it came to public schools. “When schools go solar, students learn about it, they talk to parents, families are inspired,” she said, “We see a ripple […]

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Patagonia Founder Gives Away the Company to Fight Climate Change

A half century after founding the outdoor apparel maker Patagonia, Yvon Chouinard, the eccentric rock climber who became a reluctant billionaire with his unconventional spin on capitalism, has given the company away. Rather than selling the company or taking it public, Mr. Chouinard, his wife and two adult children have transferred their ownership of Patagonia, […]

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Oil Executives Privately Contradicted Public Statements on Climate, Files Show

Documents obtained by Congressional investigators show that oil industry executives privately downplayed their companies’ own public messages about efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and weakened industry-wide commitments to push for climate policies. Internal Exxon documents show that the oil giant pressed an industry group, the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative, to remove language from […]

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Where the New Climate Law Means More Drilling, Not Less

HOUMA, La. — Justin Solet planted his foot on the edge of his camouflage green boat in Bayou Chauvin and pointed to a natural gas rig protruding from the waters ahead. A web of pipelines and rusted storage tanks jutted up from the marsh behind him as a shrimp boat floated past and markers for […]

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