Tag: War Crimes, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

What Samantha Power Learned on the Job

THE EDUCATION OF AN IDEALISTA MemoirBy Samantha Power Whenever The New York Times invites me to do a book review, I look for an excuse. I’d rather spend my extra time writing books than reviewing them. But when the Book Review editors asked me to review Samantha Power’s “The Education of an Idealist: A Memoir,” […]

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A Million Refugees May Soon Lose Their Line to the Outside World

BANGKOK — About one million Rohingya Muslims in camps in Bangladesh could soon lose a vital connection to the outside world if the government moves forward with a threat to suspend cell service to the world’s largest refugee settlement. Citing “state security” and “public safety,” the Bangladeshi telecommunications minister ordered a halt this week to […]

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A Season of Hope in Sudan

The sight of the former president of Sudan, Omar Hassan al-Bashir, sitting caged inside a courtroom in Khartoum on Monday had an absurdly theatrical aspect to it. For nearly 30 years Mr. al-Bashir pranced arrogantly about, overcoming political opposition and surviving global condemnation after his 2009 indictment for war crimes. The old man in his […]

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2 Years Ago, They Fled Into Danger and Squalor. Myanmar Still Looks Worse.

When things go wrong, those in power often promise to make it right. But do they? In this series, The Times investigates to see if those promises were kept. NGA KHU YA, Myanmar — Rusting behind barbed wire, rows of trailers at a repatriation center sit empty and uninviting, evocative of a prison awaiting its […]

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How Nationalism Can Destroy a Nation

Nationalism comes in many flavors — the ethnic and the civic, the religious and the secular, the right and the left. A century ago, Theodore Roosevelt’s New Nationalism called for inheritance taxes, a ban on corporate money in politics, workers’ compensation and a living wage. By contrast, the recent National Conservative Conference outlined a “new […]

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Al-Bashir Is on Trial in Sudan. He’s Not the First Dictator to Land in Court.

Omar Hassan al-Bashir, the former president of Sudan, appeared in court this week, peering out through a metal defendant’s cage as his trial began. Mr. al-Bashir, a dictator who spent more than three decades in power before being ousted in April, is facing charges of corruption and money laundering. While some celebrated the trial as […]

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Nuon Chea, Khmer Rouge’s Chief Ideologist, Dies at 93

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — Nuon Chea, the most senior surviving member of the Khmer Rouge, who was convicted of genocide and crimes against humanity and sentenced to life in prison, died on Sunday in Cambodia. He was 93. His death at Khmer Soviet Friendship Hospital, where he had been transferred for medical treatment on July […]

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Trump Orders Navy to Strip Medals from Prosecutors in War Crimes Trial

WASHINGTON — President Trump intervened Tuesday once again on behalf of a Navy SEAL who was charged but acquitted of war crimes in the death of a captured Islamic State fighter in Iraq, ordering the military to punish the prosecutors who tried the case in the first place. Mr. Trump angrily lashed out at the […]

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Toby Walsh, A.I. Expert, Is Racing to Stop the Killer Robots

Toby Walsh, a professor at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, is one of Australia’s leading experts on artificial intelligence. He and other experts have released a report outlining the promises, and ethical pitfalls, of the country’s embrace of A.I. Recently, Dr. Walsh, 55, has been working with the Campaign to Stop Killer […]

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Netherlands Was 10 Percent Liable in Srebrenica Deaths, Top Dutch Court Finds

LONDON — The Dutch Supreme Court on Friday upheld a decision that the Netherlands was partly responsible the deaths of 350 Muslim men during the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, while slashing the level of liability for damages set in an earlier ruling. An estimated 8,000 Muslim men and boys were killed by Bosnian Serb paramilitaries after […]

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Top Myanmar Generals Are Barred From Entering U.S. Over Rohingya Killings

BANGKOK — The United States has imposed sanctions on Myanmar’s top military commander, Senior Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, and three of his highest-ranking generals for their roles in the atrocities carried out against Rohingya Muslims since 2017, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced. The four generals and their immediate family members will be barred from […]

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‘Our Duty to Fight’: The Rise of Militant Buddhism

GINTOTA, Sri Lanka — The Buddhist abbot was sitting cross-legged in his monastery, fulminating against the evils of Islam, when the petrol bomb exploded within earshot. But the abbot, the Venerable Ambalangoda Sumedhananda Thero, barely registered the blast. Waving away the mosquitoes swarming the night air in the southern Sri Lankan town of Gintota, he […]

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Bosco Ntaganda, ‘The Terminator,’ Is Convicted of Congo War Crimes by I.C.C.

THE HAGUE, Netherlands — The International Criminal Court on Monday convicted a notorious rebel commander known as “The Terminator” of 18 counts of crimes against humanity and war crimes, including murder, rape and sexual slavery for his role in atrocities in an ethnic conflict in a mineral-rich region of Congo in 2002-2003. Bosco Ntaganda, the […]

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The Trial of a Navy SEAL Chief

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher The trial of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, a decorated member of the Navy SEALs, offered rare insight into a culture that is, by design, difficult to penetrate. Our colleague tells us what he learned from […]

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Excavating a Horror That Some Koreans Wish Would Stay Buried

ASAN, South Korea — On a lush hillside torn open by an excavator, Park Sun-joo and volunteers combed through the soil with trowels and brushes, looking for villagers, including children, who were bludgeoned and buried, some still alive and moaning, by their own neighbors in 1950, at the outset of the Korean War. Mr. Park, […]

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Acquittal of Navy SEAL May Deter Others From Reporting Crimes, Some Officials Worry

SAN DIEGO — Edward Gallagher, a decorated member of the Navy SEALs, was pleased and relieved when he emerged from his court-martial on Wednesday with just a demotion and time served, and not the life sentence he could have faced if convicted on the most serious charges. But many in the Navy were in no […]

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They Hoped to Reach Europe. They Were Massacred in Libya.

On Wednesday at least 44 migrants were killed and more than 130 injured when an airstrike hit a migrant detention center in Tajoura, 10 miles east of Tripoli, the capital of Libya. Hundreds of men, women and children, mostly from African countries, who left their homes for Europe, have been locked up for months — […]

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Navy SEAL Acquitted of Murder Is Sentenced Over Posing With a Corpse

SAN DIEGO — A day after finding a decorated Navy SEAL platoon leader not guilty of war crimes including murder and attempted murder, a military jury in San Diego sentenced him on Wednesday for the one charge on which he was convicted: posing for inappropriate photos with the corpse of an enemy fighter. The SEAL, […]

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Edward Gallagher, Navy SEAL Chief Accused of War Crimes, Is Found Not Guilty of Murder

SAN DIEGO — Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, a Navy SEAL platoon leader accused of war crimes, was found not guilty on Tuesday of first-degree murder of a captive fighter and attempted murder of civilians in Iraq, but was convicted of a single charge for posing with the dead body of an ISIS captive. Chief […]

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