Tag: War Crimes, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

How a Historian Got Close, Maybe Too Close, to a Nazi Thief

By the late 1990s, most of the Nazi art experts who helped loot European Jews were either dead or living quiet lives under the radar. Not so Bruno Lohse, who served as the art agent to the Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring, Hitler’s right-hand man. In 1998, Jonathan Petropoulos, a European history professor at Claremont McKenna College, […]

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Germany’s Buchenwald Memorial Urges Visitors to Respect Graves

The memorial at the former Buchenwald concentration camp in central Germany stepped up security this week after some visitors went sledding on graves, the latest example of violations that have happened at former Nazi camps in recent years. The episode at Buchenwald, where tens of thousands of prisoners died, has left historians worried, again, that […]

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U.S. to Declare Yemen’s Houthis a Terrorist Group, Raising Fears of Fueling a Famine

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will designate the Houthi rebels in Yemen as a foreign terrorist organization, four U.S. officials familiar with the decision said on Sunday, deploying one of his last means of hard power against Saudi Arabia’s nemesis at the risk of exacerbating a famine in one of the world’s poorest […]

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It Took a Genocide for Me to Remember My Uighur Roots

The first time I truly realized I was Uighur was just three years ago, when I saw the now-infamous viral photo of rows of Turkic men in dark blue uniforms, sitting in a concentration camp in Hotan, Xinjiang, a so-called Uighur autonomous region in China. Scanning the prisoners’ despondent faces, I was startled by their […]

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Trump’s Most Disgusting Pardons

Gen. Raymond Odierno, then the commander of U.S. forces in Iraq, wrote to Ali’s mother, “In the face of your family’s own personal tragedy, your act of kindness and compassion for grieving American families is truly remarkable.” Until Tuesday, the American system worked to give Ali’s family a modicum of justice. Blackwater settled with the […]

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For a Defeated President, Pardons as an Expression of Grievance

The elder Mr. Kushner set up his brother-in-law, who was cooperating with the investigation, by hiring a prostitute to seduce him and then sending a tape of the act to his wife, Mr. Kushner’s own sister. He was prosecuted by Chris Christie, a U.S. attorney at the time and later the governor of New Jersey. […]

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Blackwater’s Bullets Scarred Iraqis. Trump’s Pardon Renewed the Pain.

BAGHDAD, Iraq — Haider Ahmed Rabia was stuck in traffic in Baghdad 13 years ago when guards with the American security contractor Blackwater opened fire with machine guns and grenade launchers, killing or wounding at least 31 Iraqi civilians. He still carries some of those bullets in his legs. In 2014, he was one of […]

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Laura Poitras: Journalism Is Not a Crime

The charges against Mr. Assange date back a decade, to when WikiLeaks, in collaboration with The Guardian, The New York Times, Der Spiegel and others, published the Iraq and Afghanistan war logs, and subsequently partnered with The Guardian to publish State Department cables. The indictment describes many activities conducted by news organizations every day, including […]

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Sesame Street Creates New Muppets for Rohingya Refugees

BANGKOK — Six-year-old twins Noor and Aziz live in the largest refugee camp in the world. They are Rohingya Muslims who escaped ethnic cleansing in their native Myanmar for refuge in neighboring Bangladesh. They are also Muppets. On Thursday, the Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit that runs the early education TV show “Sesame Street” and operates […]

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I.C.C. Won’t Investigate China’s Detention of Muslims

The International Criminal Court has decided not to pursue an investigation into China’s mass detention of Muslims, a setback for activists eager to hold Beijing accountable for persecution of ethnic and religious minorities. Prosecutors in The Hague said on Monday that they would not, for the moment, investigate allegations that China had committed genocide and […]

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Court Finds Evidence of Crimes Against Humanity in the Philippines

MANILA — The International Criminal Court issued a preliminary report on Tuesday in which it said there was evidence to show crimes against humanity had been committed in the Philippines under President Rodrigo Duterte, whose bloody drug war has left thousands dead since 2016. The report was issued by Fatou Bensouda, the chief prosecutor of […]

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After Nagorno-Karabakh War, Trauma, Tragedy and Devastation

For Armenians uprooted from their homes, and for Azerbaijanis returning to uninhabitable towns, “It’s going to be very hard to forgive.” By Carlotta Gall and Anton Troianovski Photographs by Mauricio Lima and Ivor Prickett FIZULI, Azerbaijan — Venturing into territory that Azerbaijan recently recaptured from Armenia is a journey into a devastated wasteland reminiscent of […]

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Executed Nigerian Farmers Were Caught Between Boko Haram and the Army

ZABARMARI, Nigeria — For years, the farmers had an agreement with Boko Haram militants: They could tend their fields in peace, as long as they did not report the fighters’ presence to the Nigerian Army. But just over a week ago, that deal was broken. The Islamist group killed more than 70 farmers from Zabarmari, […]

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Supreme Court Hears Holocaust Survivors’ Cases Against Hungary and Germany

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court, wary in the past of cases concerning conduct by and against foreigners that took place abroad, heard arguments on Monday over whether American courts have a role in deciding whether Hungary and Germany must pay for property said to have been stolen from Jews before and during World War II. […]

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Decades Later, Liberian Warlord Faces War Crimes Trial in Switzerland

Mr. Kosiah has been detained by Swiss authorities since his arrest in Bern in November 2014 on allegations of war crimes committed in the first Liberian civil war. He had moved to Switzerland and acquired permanent residence in 1997 but was detained after a complaint to the Swiss attorney general’s office by the Swiss-based group […]

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‘The Lessons of Nuremberg Must Be Continually Relearned’

To the Editor: Seventy-five years ago this week, my father, Thomas J. Dodd, stepped to the podium to address for the first time one of the most important trials in history: the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. Over the next 11 months, he and his fellow prosecutors presented overwhelming evidence of the machinery of death […]

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Casualties From Banned Cluster Bombs Nearly Doubled in 2019, Mostly in Syria

Casualties from cluster bombs, the internationally banned weapons that kill indiscriminately, nearly doubled last year, mostly because of use by the Russian-backed armed forces of Syria in that country’s nearly decade-old war, a monitoring group reported on Wednesday. At least 286 people were killed or wounded in 2019 from cluster-bomb attacks or from remnants of […]

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Amnesia Grips a Bosnian Spa That Served as a Rape Camp

VISEGRAD, Bosnia and Herzegovina — As night falls, owls hoot and frogs croak in the forest around Vilina Vlas, a spa getaway in eastern Bosnia. A gentle wind rustles the pine trees that swaddle the health resort, described by one guidebook as “a perfect spot for a romantic evening.” Eager for a good rest after […]

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Under a Divisive Peace, Wartime Rifts Hobble Hope in Bosnia

TRNOPOLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina — Heartened by a peace deal between Bosnia’s warring tribes brokered 25 years ago by the United States, Jusuf Arifagic, a Bosnian refugee sheltering in Norway, returned home to help rebuild his traumatized country. He took with him 100 Norwegian cows. Mr. Arifagic took the cows to his home village — […]

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Lee Hyo-jae, Champion of Women’s Rights in South Korea, Dies at 95

When Lee Hyo-jae learned of a university colleague’s research into the Korean “comfort women” taken by the Japanese military for use as sex slaves during World War II, she came to view the government-sanctioned enslavement as one of history’s most brutal war crimes. She spent the next two decades fighting to bring attention to the […]

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How a Human Rights Angel Lost Her Halo

When Daw Aung San Suu Kyi emerged from years of house arrest a decade ago, having never used a smartphone or Facebook, she held court in the office of her banned political party, the smell of damp emanating from the human rights reports piled on the floor. Armed with nothing more than a collection of […]

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Nobel Peace Prize: A Growing List of Questionable Choices

One ordered his country’s armed forces to crush a defiant region’s resistance. Another ignored genocidal killings of a minority. Some had pushed for peaceful outcomes, but the achievements exalted at the time proved flawed or ineffective in hindsight. All were winners of the Nobel Peace Prize. At least six times in recent decades, the Norwegian […]

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How to Shame a Dictator

Op-Docs Their neighbors carried out crimes against humanity — and were exposed for it. Video transcript Back 0:00/13:51 transcript Atención! Murderer Next Door What to do when your neighbors have carried out crimes against humanity. In the mid 1990’s, we found ourselves in a tragic and uncomfortable situation of living amongst known torturers, kidnappers, and […]

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Kosovo President Resigns to Fight War Crimes Case in the Netherlands

The president of Kosovo, a guerrilla leader during Kosovo’s fight for independence against Serbia, resigned on Thursday to face charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity at a special international court in the Netherlands. President Hashim Thaci, 52, said at a news conference in Pristina, Kosovo’s capital, that he was stepping down to protect […]

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Kosovo President Resigns to Face War Crimes Case in the Netherlands

The president of Kosovo, a guerrilla leader during Kosovo’s fight for independence against Serbia, resigned on Thursday to face charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity at a special international court in the Netherlands. President Hashim Thaci said at a news conference in Pristina, Kosovo’s capital, that he was stepping down to protect the […]

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Armenians Under Fire: Who Will Help?

To the Editor: Re “Resignation and Despair Stoke Armenian Conflict” (front page, Oct. 19): Your reporting on the escalating attacks on Armenians in the ethnic Armenian enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh filled me with dread. Large-scale military action carried out by Azerbaijan with Turkey’s support, reports of human rights violations, and continued bombings on the civilian population […]

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Trump’s Sanctions on International Court May Do Little Beyond Alienating Allies

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo came to the State Department briefing room ready to punish. On Sept. 2, he took to the lectern and called the International Criminal Court — which investigates war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide — a “thoroughly broken and corrupted institution.” Then he announced sanctions on the tribunal’s […]

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For Young Rohingya Brides, Marriage Means a Perilous, Deadly Crossing

BANGKOK — Haresa counted the days by the moon, waxing and waning over the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Her days on the trawler, crammed into a space so tight that she could not even stretch her legs, bled into weeks, the weeks into months. “People struggled like they were fish flopping around,” […]

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How Turkey’s Military Adventures Decrease Freedom at Home

ISTANBUL — A procession of cars filled with men waving the flag of Azerbaijan, honking and whistling drove through the Kumkapi area in Istanbul, which is home to the Armenian Patriarchate of Istanbul and many Armenian families. The car rally, on Sept. 28, was a provocation, a threat that filled my community, the tiny Armenian […]

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Facebook Bans Content About Holocaust Denial From Its Site

In 2018, Facebook’s chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, famously cited Holocaust deniers in a fumbled attempt to make a point about free speech. At the time, he said the deniers — those who reject or distort the Holocaust, a genocide in which millions of Jews and others were killed by Nazis and their collaborators during World […]

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