Tag: internal-storyline-no

Bring the Kids Along

When I was a child, we rarely went on big family trips. Part of that is generational. I was born in the ’60s, when the lives of children and their parents were more separate. Air travel was still special and, in my family, reserved for the adults. But there was something innate, too. I think […]

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Donald Trump Indicted

A former American president has been indicted. A Manhattan grand jury voted yesterday to indict Donald Trump. The case relates to his involvement in paying hush money to a porn star to bury a sex scandal in the final days of his 2016 presidential campaign. There is still a lot we don’t know, including the […]

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Obamacare Keeps Winning

The next year, voters in Idaho, Nebraska and Utah — red states, all — passed ballot initiatives expanding Medicaid. Oklahoma, Missouri and South Dakota have since done so. Montana’s state legislature has also approved an expansion. Credit…American Medical Association Communications Division In 2019, Gov. Andy Beshear of Kentucky, a Democrat, narrowly won election in a […]

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Meet the Geothermal Champions

There’s a lot to like about geothermal energy. It’s clean, it’s renewable and it generates electricity 24/7. It taps heat from Earth’s interior that, in theory, will last billions of years. I recently traveled to Japan, a country that sits atop the third-largest geothermal resources of any country by some measures, with Chang W. Lee, […]

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A Win for Israel’s Protesters

Much of life in Israel came to a halt yesterday: Hospitals stopped providing nonemergency care, planes were grounded at the country’s main airport, and malls and banks closed. The disruptions were part of an escalation in protests against the government’s proposed judicial overhaul, which has plunged Israel into one of its gravest political crises ever. […]

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A Republican Spending Problem

As congressional Republicans prepare for a budget showdown later this year with President Biden, they say that they will insist on large cuts to federal spending. So far, though, they have left out some pretty important details: what those cuts might be. Republicans have been more willing to talk about what they won’t cut. Party […]

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History in the Rubble

Times graphics reporters Anjali Singhvi and Bedel Saget recently traveled to Antakya, a Turkish city badly damaged by February’s earthquakes. Based on their reporting, they published an article this week that walks through the damage in Antakya’s Old City, a commercial and religious hub. The initial quakes were several weeks ago, but the damage continues […]

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‘Succession’ Returns

What will we watch when it’s over? This question has come up lately whenever I encounter a fellow fan of “Succession,” which begins its fourth and final season tomorrow. We confess to anticipatory grief, pre-missing the despicable, irresistible Roy family, only 10 episodes to go. I wonder if this intensity of emotion isn’t only about […]

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What I’m Reading: The Rise of Fascism Edition

This week, in the same spirit that led me to rewatch all of “Babylon Berlin” last month, I read “Wigs on the Green,” Nancy Mitford’s 1935 comic novel spoofing her sisters Diana and Unity, who were deeply involved with the fascist movements in Britain and Germany. (Diana’s wedding to Oswald Mosley, the leader of the […]

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Cleaner Air Helps Everyone. It Helps Black Communities a Lot.

The Environmental Protection Agency is considering new standards for the maximum amount of fine particulate matter, tiny specks about one-thirtieth the diameter of a human hair that can penetrate the lungs, in outdoor air. A recent study examined how the benefits of stricter limits would be distributed across American society. What’s new in this research […]

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TikTok’s C.E.O. Struggles to Make his Case in Washington

TikTok’s tough day in Congress The C.E.O. of TikTok was grilled for nearly five hours in Congress on Thursday about his company’s ties to China, and his testimony did little to suggest the video platform’s problems are over. The aggressive questioning of Shou Chew has only added fuel to fiery U.S.-China relations and highlighted TikTok’s […]

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Free Speech (or Not) at Stanford

Stuart Kyle Duncan — a federal appeals court judge appointed by Donald Trump — visited Stanford Law School this month to give a talk. It didn’t go well. Students frequently interrupted him with heckling. One protester called for his daughters to be raped, Duncan said. When he asked Stanford administrators to calm the crowd, the […]

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Investors Try to Parse Powell and Yellen’s Next Moves on Banks

No clear path on helping banks U.S. banking regulators gave investors a lot to chew on yesterday. The Federal Reserve went ahead with a quarter-point increase in interest rates, signaling that, for now, it remained more worried about inflation than banking stability. But while Jerome Powell, the central bank’s chair, and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen […]

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The Threat of TikTok

The platforms are so powerful, their names are verbs: Google, Uber, Instagram, Netflix. For years, the dominance of American tech companies has brought economic benefits to the United States. It has also offered an advantage in a less obvious area — national security. Tech companies gather incredible amounts of data about their users. They know […]

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The Fed’s Unpleasant Choice

The Federal Reserve faces a difficult decision at its meeting that ends this afternoon: Should Fed officials raise interest rates in response to worrisome recent inflation data — and accept the risk of causing further problems for banks? Or should officials pause their rate increases — and accept the risk that inflation will remain high? […]

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Notes From One Woman’s Decade of Eating Scones

When Sarah Merker sat down one day in 2013 to snack on a scone at one of Britain’s many, many historic sites, she had no idea that she was embarking upon a quest that would take her a decade to complete and transform her into a kind of national celebrity. She and her husband had […]

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The I.P.C.C. Report Offers a Clear Message

“There is a rapidly closing window of opportunity to secure a livable and sustainable future for all (very high confidence).” This is the most striking sentence in a 37-page summary, issued today, of the latest report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. It tells us what’s possible. It tells us the stakes. The report […]

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Spring Returns

I like to be up when it’s dark in the morning, to move sleepily around in the dark, working and sipping coffee and listening to music undistracted. I keep the lights off, which keeps the visual noise off. Outside, only the moon, maybe one neighbor’s television flashing blue and green on the living room wall. […]

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Wild neighbors

What’s wild around you? Turns out, quite a bit. A few weeks ago, we asked you about the interactions you’ve been having with wildlife in your communities, and, wow, I’m jealous. Don’t get me wrong, I’m lucky to live in Rio de Janeiro. I’ve been harassed by sneaky marmosets, shouted at by croaking toucans and […]

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March Madness Is Here

For many Americans, the next few days are among the most entertaining of the year. They will be filled with dozens of college basketball games, featuring major surprises and thrilling finishes. When a team loses, its season is over. The main portion of the men’s March Madness starts today, and the women’s tournament follows tomorrow. […]

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A Hungarian Town Seethes Over a Giant Chinese Battery Plant

The small-town mayor, long a loyal foot soldier for Hungary’s governing party, recently committed what he described as “political suicide,” throwing himself in the path of an enormous $7.8 billion Chinese battery factory project promoted by his dissent-intolerant prime minister, Viktor Orban. “It is like lying in front of a steamroller,” Zoltan Timar, the mayor […]

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Goldman Sachs Eyes a Big Payout from Silicon Valley Bank Deal

But not all Democratic senators and their allies agree that the 2018 deregulation was to blame here: Both Jon Tester of Montana and Angus King, independent of Maine, said they stand by their votes for the rollback five years ago. That divide, combined with broad Republican opposition to tougher banking rules, means it’s hard to […]

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The Bank Failures, Explained

Imagine, then, that you want to buy bonds today. You would want the newer bonds because they have a higher payout. So when SVB needed to sell bonds, to raise cash that it could use for its customers’ withdrawals, it could do so only for a discount, taking a loss. The bank failed to follow […]

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A New Bank Panic?

Last night’s announcement has the benefit of reducing the likelihood of a panic today. It also prevents seemingly innocent victims — the workers and executives at companies that used SVB or Signature as their bank — from being hurt. Federal officials emphasized that they would not use taxpayer money to repay those companies. Ultimately, the […]

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