Tag: income inequality

The Real Pandemic Gap Is Between the Comfortable and the Afflicted

Rates of Covid-19 are far higher among the poor, according to a federal analysis reported by The Washington Post. For Medicare beneficiaries also eligible for Medicaid, the rate of coronavirus cases was 1,732 per 100,000. For those with incomes too high for Medicaid, it was just 320 per 100,000. Earlier in the pandemic, poor neighborhoods […]

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Families Priced Out of ‘Learning Pods’ Seek Alternatives

WASHINGTON — When Shy Rodriguez heard about one of the hottest trends in education during the pandemic — “learning pods,” where parents hire teachers for small-group, in-home instruction — she knew immediately it was something she could never afford for her sons. Like many parents, Ms. Rodriguez, a single mother and nursing assistant in Wilkes-Barre, […]

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Remote Learning Is Hard. Losing Family Members Is Worse.

SAN DIEGO — Last month, I learned that my uncle died of Covid-19. Not long after, his mother passed away from the virus, too. Since my parents are essential workers, I’m starting my senior year of high school worrying whether they’re next. I live in one of San Diego’s most infected ZIP codes. And I’m […]

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Why Parents, With ‘No Good Choice’ This School Year, Are Blaming One Another

ImagePreschoolers at a summer school session in Monterey Park, Calif., last month. School will look very different this year, and it leaves parents with difficult choices and little support.Credit…Frederic J. Brown/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images It’s the newest front in America’s parenting wars. Parents, forced to figure out how to care for and educate their […]

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With the Biden-Harris Ticket, Environmental Justice Is a Focus

WASHINGTON — Just six days before Joseph R. Biden Jr. tapped Kamala Harris to be his running mate in the presidential election, the California senator released sweeping environmental justice legislation. The timing, climate activists said, was important if not prescient. The Climate Equity Act, an expanded version of a bill Ms. Harris and Representative Alexandria […]

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Kurt Andersen Asks: What Is the Future of America?

EVIL GENIUSESThe Unmaking of America: A Recent HistoryBy Kurt Andersen It used to be called the New World. Now it’s run by a man who wants to make it great “again.” Sometime between then and now, the writer Kurt Andersen argues in his essential, absorbing, infuriating, full-of-facts-you-didn’t-know, saxophonely written new book, America lost one of […]

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The Real Reason the American Economy Boomed After World War II

The United States long reserved its most lucrative occupations for an elite class of white men. Those men held power by selling everyone else a myth: The biggest threat to workers like you are workers who do not look like you. Again and again, they told working-class white men that they were losing out on […]

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Why Black Workers Will Hurt the Most if Congress Doesn’t Extend Jobless Benefits

ImageProtesters calling for economic relief this week in New York.Credit…Angela Weiss/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images When Congress expanded unemployment insurance this year to meet the staggering economic toll of the pandemic, it had one less-noticed effect: It made America’s fractured jobless benefits system more fair. Starting in April, the federal government provided $600 weekly payments […]

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Black and Pregnant During Covid: ‘They Never Had Time to See Me’

In March, with the coronavirus lockdown in full swing, Chrissy Sample was feeling anxious. Furloughed from her job and stuck at home with her 8-year-old son, she was also pregnant with twins, who were due in mid-July. Although she often felt immobilized by an intense pain in her legs and lower abdomen, her doctor regularly […]

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Where Will the New Good Jobs Come From? Look Here

The United States long reserved its most lucrative occupations for an elite class of white men. Those men held power by selling everyone else a myth: The biggest threat to workers like you are workers who do not look like you. Again and again, they told working-class white men that they were losing out on […]

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Kenya’s Unusual Solution to the School Problem: Cancel the Year and Start Over

NAIROBI, Kenya — For Esther Adhiambo, this year was supposed to be a year of endings and new beginnings. She was expecting to complete high school, enroll in a university and get a job to help her single mother, who runs a small tailoring business in Nairobi’s Mathare slum. Instead, for Ms. Adhiambo and other […]

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It’s Not Just You. We’ve All Got a Case of the Covid-19 Blues.

I am trying to think of when I first realized we’d all run smack into a wall. Was it two weeks ago, when a friend, ordinarily a paragon of wifely discretion, started a phone conversation with a boffo rant about her husband? Was it when I looked at my own spouse — one week later, […]

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Will Covid-19 Patients in Rural Areas Get the Care They Need?

There she was. After more than three weeks on the ventilator, after battling weakness and delirium on the general medical floor and a stay at the long-term rehab hospital where she rebuilt the strength to walk again, my patient had made it home. The dark shadows beneath her eyes were fading. Her skin was tanned. […]

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COVID-19 Is Proof of Just How Socially Determined Health Is

In late March, when TV journalist Chris Cuomo announced that he had COVID-19, his brother Andrew, the governor of New York, tweeted in response: “This virus is the great equalizer.” Around the same time, Madonna expressed a similar sentiment. Posting a video filmed in a bathtub filled with rose petals, she said, “That’s the thing […]

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Overcrowded Housing Invites Covid-19, Even in Silicon Valley

It was not surprising when three-quarters of the house tested positive. There were 12 people in three bedrooms, with a bathroom whose door frequently required a knock and a kitchen where dinnertime shifts extended from 5 p.m. well into the evening. Karla Lorenzo, a Guatemalan immigrant who cleaned houses in San Francisco and Silicon Valley, […]

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Why the Working Class Votes Against Its Economic Interests

THE SYSTEMWho Rigged It, How We Fix ItBy Robert B. ReichBREAK ’EM UPRecovering Our Freedom From Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big MoneyBy Zephyr Teachout One of the mysteries in politics for decades now has been why white working-class Americans began to vote Republican in large numbers in the 1960s and 1970s. After all, it […]

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3 Post-Coronavirus Economic Reforms to Make the World Better

The scale of the coronavirus pandemic and the economic shutdowns it caused set in motion a series of debates and questions about what the world may look like once its stranglehold on society loosens: Will we travel less? Will we work at home more? Will norms in schools and at large-scale public events be changed […]

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Black Women Would Earn Nearly $1 Million More Over Their Lifetimes If They Were Paid the Same as White Men

Photo: GaudiLab (Shutterstock) For anyone familiar with the racial or gender pay gaps, it ought to be a familiar statistic: a typical Black woman will make 62 cents for every dollar a white man makes. That gap has necessitated its own awareness day: Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, set to take place this year on […]

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Trump Is Trying to Bend Reality to His Will

Disruption, disorder and disease are gripping the United States as the 2020 election draws near, leading to an unusual degree of unpredictability about our political future. Despite current state and national polling that favors Democrats, we still can’t say for sure whether the nation will tip left or right. “Modern democracies are currently experiencing destabilizing […]

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Trump Is Trying to Bend Reality to His Will

Disruption, disorder and disease are gripping the United States as the 2020 election draws near, leading to an unusual degree of unpredictability about our political future. Despite current state and national polling that favors Democrats, we still can’t say for sure whether the nation will tip left or right. “Modern democracies are currently experiencing destabilizing […]

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Pandemic Luxury: ‘Concierge-Style’ Coaches and $350 Movie Tickets

In the bedroom of her East Village apartment, Alison Mazur relaxed into her chair and sighed contentedly while an aesthetician coated her nails in taupe polish. It was the first professional manicure-pedicure she’d had in four months, since coronavirus restrictions forced salons across the country to close their doors. Ms. Mazur had to put her […]

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Coronavirus Threatens the Luster of Superstar Cities

Cities are remarkably resilient. They have risen from the ashes after being carpet-bombed and hit with nuclear weapons. “If you think about pandemics in the past,” noted the Princeton economist Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, “they didn’t destroy cities.” That’s because cities are valuable. The New York metropolitan area generates more economic output than Australia or Spain. The […]

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Danny Meyer’s Restaurants Will End Their No-Tipping Policy

One of the country’s best-known restaurateurs, Danny Meyer, announced five years ago that his Union Square Hospitality Group would gradually eliminate tipping. The group’s decision began an industrywide examination of the age-old practice, but adopting it proved complicated, especially in New York State, where laws governing tip distribution are strict. Still, especially in recent months, […]

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The Pandemic Has Pushed Aside City Planning Rules. But to Whose Benefit?

ImageA closed-off street in Oakland in April.Credit…Jeff Chiu/Associated Press One month into the coronavirus crisis this spring, Oakland, Calif., began to restrict car traffic on some streets — ultimately on 21 miles of them — to create outdoor space for residents who suddenly had nowhere else to go. Other cities have also responded with remarkably […]

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Black Business Owners Had a Harder Time Getting Federal Aid, a Study Finds

Black business owners are more likely to be hindered in seeking coronavirus financial aid than their white peers, a new study has found. The study looked at how more than a dozen Washington-area banks handled requests for loans under the federal government’s Paycheck Protection Program. It was conducted by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, a […]

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New York City Has 2,300 Parks. But Poor Neighborhoods Lose Out.

Governors Island, a 172-acre oasis in the middle of New York Harbor, has become one of New York’s City’s most popular summer playgrounds with hammocks, biking and spectacular water views. But the island’s managers want it to be a greater resource for those who need it the most, especially during the pandemic — poor and […]

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Why Push Public Schools to Open Without Helping Them Open Safely?

As the coronavirus continues to wreak havoc across the United States, some public K-12 schools may be able to reopen safely, but doing so will not be cheap. A recent report from the Council of Chief State School Officers estimated that public K-12 schools will need as much as $245 billion in additional funding to […]

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What’s the Value of Harvard Without a Campus?

Dumebi Adigwe, a rising sophomore studying mathematics at Harvard University, has no idea where she is going to live. This week, Harvard announced it would allow only up to 40 percent of its nearly 6,800 undergraduates on campus in the fall, the vast majority of them freshmen, and that all classes would be held online. […]

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The Two Sides of Biden’s Economic Plan

But the most eloquent part of Biden’s speech was this: “We must reward work as much as we’ve rewarded wealth.” I’m not sure Biden has put it exactly this way before; I couldn’t find an earlier instance on Google. But I hope he repeats that sentence a lot going forward. It’s an admirably simple expression […]

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Hurricane Season Traps People on the Wrong Side of the Income Gap

But even a mildly active hurricane season this year could be disastrous. Florida is still dealing with exploding Covid-19 cases and an unemployment system that has been so slow and inconsistent in providing aid that it is facing a class-action lawsuit. Those catastrophes have disproportionately fallen on low-income people. In response to Covid, the federal […]

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