Tag: Poverty

The 15th Anniversary of Kanye’s ‘Fuck Higher Education’ Album

Photo: Kevin Winter (Getty Images) On February 10, 2004, Kanye West, aka Yeezy, released his debut album, The College Dropout. The album remains a classic that won multiple Grammys and the certification of triple platinum. Its message also explains why it remains important today. The album was the most popular indictment of the higher education system. […]

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This Is What Trump Quietly Screwing the Poor Looks Like

Of all the powerful business interests that have benefited from Donald Trump’s unhinged presidency, payday lenders might be the easiest to overlook. They shouldn’t be. These companies prey on precarity by offering high-cost loans to cash-strapped borrowers, making billions of dollars annually even as their customers often get stuck in a vicious cycle of deprivation. […]

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How the Drug War Eats the Poor

This article originally appeared on VICE UK. In New York, the trial of the cartel boss Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán is entering its third month. The El Chapo story is full of million-dollar deals, outrageous prison escapes and, of course, the grotesque violence and political corruption made inevitable by the illegal drug trade. However, the […]

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A Hillbilly and a Survivalist Show the Way Out of Trump Country

The two great literary bookends of President Trump’s half-term of grift and chaos have come from survivors of the most broken white communities that helped put him in office. They also show us the best way out of the basement of American despair. How J.D. Vance, the author of “Hillbilly Elegy,” and Tara Westover, who […]

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news analysis: What Is the Blood of a Poor Person Worth?

PHILADELPHIA — Jacqueline Watson needed money. Her son had called her that morning from prison, where he is serving a life sentence, to ask her to make a deposit in his phone account. She didn’t have cash, but she did have something she could sell quickly and legally — her blood. So, on a crisp […]

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On Soccer: Pound Notes, Canned Soup and Common Goals

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE, England — Bill Corcoran is in his usual spot, in the shadow of St. James’ Park, opposite Shearer’s bar, rattling his bucket, when a pack of a dozen Manchester United fans marches past. They are wearing black jackets, hoods raised to stave off the cold. Just as they reach Corcoran, they launch into a […]

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A New Home for Extreme Poverty: Middle-Income Countries

The share of the world’s population in extreme poverty — subsisting on less than $1.90 a day, adjusted for inflation and cost of living across countries — has plummeted from 42 percent in 1981 to 10 percent in 2015. Poverty fell not only proportionally but in absolute terms as well: The number of people in […]

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Deadly Mexico Pipeline Disaster Poses Major Test for New President

MEXICO CITY — Word spread quickly: free gasoline. It was spewing from a pipeline, through a hole punched by fuel thieves. People — as many as 900, by some estimates — flocked to the rupture, many carrying containers to fill. But just as quickly, the apparent windfall on Friday turned to disaster when the pipeline […]

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Shutdown’s Pain Cuts Deep for the Homeless and Other Vulnerable Americans

WASHINGTON — Ramona Wormley-Mitsis got welcome news in December: After years of waiting, the federal government had approved a subsidy that allowed her to rent a three-bedroom house, bracketed by a white picket fence to keep her two autistic sons from bolting into traffic. A few days later, the dream was deferred. The Department of […]

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At Los Angeles Teachers’ Strike, a Rallying Cry: More Funding, Fewer Charters

LOS ANGELES — Maria Lopez had to rush off for her job at a nearby laundromat. Carmen Vasquez did not want her son to ruin his perfect attendance and needed to get to the home across town where she cleans a couple of times a week. Aurelia Aguilar needed to get to the restaurant where […]

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Feature: How Cities Make Money by Fining the Poor

On a muggy afternoon in October 2017, Jamie Tillman walked into the public library in Corinth, Miss., and slumped down at one of the computers on the ground floor. In recent years, Tillman, who is slight and freckled, with reddish blond hair that she often wears piled atop her head, had been drifting from her […]

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Times Insider: Hearing Divorce Cases on a Sidewalk in Niger, as Women Assert Their Power

Times Insider delivers behind-the-scenes insights into how news, features and opinion come together at The New York Times. I was reporting in the West African nation of Niger when the Unicef workers I was traveling with suggested we make a side trip to a clinic that treats women suffering from fistula. Fistula occurs when the […]

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Of 800,000 Poor New Yorkers, Only 30,000 Can Get the New Half-Priced MetroCards

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] The first phase of what was to be a sweeping plan to provide half-priced subway and bus rides to the poorest New Yorkers arrived on Friday, a few days late and many people short. If the plan had been […]

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New York City’s Poor Were Promised Half-Priced MetroCards. They’re Still Waiting

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] The proposal was intended to help poor New Yorkers by offering them discount MetroCards for the subway and buses and put the city at the forefront of national efforts to find ways to address inequality. But the launch of […]

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The Dangerous Rise of the IUD as Poverty Cure

Over the past decade, more and more women have begun using long-acting, reversible birth control methods like intrauterine devices and implants. These birth control methods are highly effective at preventing pregnancy but were previously not widely accessible because of high costs and lack of knowledge among health care providers. Increasing access to these methods, for […]

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Living Paycheck to Paycheck Looks Different For Everyone, But the Struggle Is Still Real

Photo: iStock There are a great many people in this country who are one missed paycheck away from financial ruin. They may not look like what you expect. They may drive nice cars, live in nice neighborhoods and even be what some people on Instagram would hashtag as #Goals, but beyond the happy smiles on […]

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The Dickensian Tragedy of Britain’s Growing Poverty

One hundred and seventy-five years after it was published, Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol is still drawing audiences. This year its nearly sold-out adaptation at The Old Vic theatre in London has a post-show collection for The Felix Project, an organization that collects surplus food and redistributes it to charities—a classic pairing for a work which, […]

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