Tag: Renting and Leasing (Real Estate)

Who’s Afraid of a Transit Desert?

For a city crisscrossed with subway and rail lines, New York has its share of remote outposts — considered by some to be transit deserts, but to others urban oases. Now a growing number of bargain hunters, including real estate developers, are homing in on properties farther from the train — at least a 15-minute […]

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In Berlin, a Creative Paradise That’s Easiest to Reach by Boat

Thirty years ago, when the Berlin Wall came down, the city was left with huge swaths of empty buildings in the former East: old German Democratic Republic embassies and factory complexes, some still riddled with toxic waste. It was both a daunting and heady opportunity for Berlin to reinvent itself and start over. Artists and […]

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What if You Could Rent an Apartment Without a Security Deposit?

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] Nothing is certain in the grueling hunt for a New York City apartment, except perhaps the inevitability of shelling out thousands of dollars upfront in broker fees, one month’s rent and a security deposit. In 2016, New York City […]

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Living Where You Can Walk to Work

Megan Doyle has been teaching dance at the 92nd Street Y — the renowned cultural and community center on the Upper East Side — for nearly 10 years, and in that time she has lived in five different homes across three boroughs. She started as a tap dance teacher in 2010 with one Saturday morning […]

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It’s Manhattan’s Last Affordable Neighborhood. But for How Long?

For decades, Inwood has been one of New York City’s untouched gems. Nestled among rivers and rolling forest at the northernmost tip of Manhattan, the 500-acre neighborhood has again and again batted away the forces of gentrification — until now. As the city confronts an affordable housing crisis, it has finally opened up Inwood to […]

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Threat to Report Tenant to ICE May Cost Landlord $17,000

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] For most of the seven years that Holly Ondaan lived in her Queens apartment building, she rarely clashed with her landlord. That changed when she started having money troubles and stopped paying rent. The landlord, Diana Lysius, then took […]

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Does Your Real Estate Broker Owe You a Refund?

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] When Jo Ellen Pellman and her roommate searched for an apartment in New York City this summer, the two women dug deep into their pockets: They paid brokers a total of $1,200 in nonrefundable application fees, or $400 for […]

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Should People Profit From Housing? Bernie Sanders Says Yes, and No

ImageBernie Sanders greeting supporters after a campaign event in Reno, Nev., this month.CreditMax Whittaker for The New York Times Bernie Sanders has gone much further than any of the other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates in proposing not just more money for affordable housing, or more enforcement of fair-housing laws, but also fundamental changes in how […]

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How Telecommuting Has Changed Real Estate

As wireless technology changes how and where people do their jobs, giving many the freedom to work remotely at least part of the time, so too is it changing their thinking around real estate. Remote workers still represent a minority of the work force. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of last year, […]

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One in Four of New York’s New Luxury Apartments Are Unsold

Picture an empty apartment — there are thousands in Manhattan’s new towers — and fill it with the city’s chattiest real estate developers. How do you quiet the room? Ask about their sales. Among the more than 16,200 condo units across 682 new buildings completed in New York City since 2013, one in four remain […]

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California Approves Statewide Rent Control to Ease Housing Crisis

California lawmakers enacted a statewide rent cap on Wednesday covering millions of tenants, the biggest step yet in a surge of initiatives to address an affordable-housing crunch nationwide. The bill limits annual rent increases to 5 percent after inflation and offers new barriers to eviction, providing a bit of housing security in a state with […]

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California Rent Control Bill Advances, Fueled by Housing Crisis

California’s escalating housing costs have yielded epic commutes and a rising tide of homelessness. Now they are close to producing a political milestone: a vast expansion of tenant-protection laws that would cap rents statewide. On Tuesday, the State Senate voted to advance a bill to limit rent increases to 5 percent a year plus a […]

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The Studio That Turned Out to Be a Family Heirloom

Lindsay Rosenblum, a New Orleans native, thought it was a happy coincidence when she realized that a West Village studio she was thinking about renting happened to be in a building where her mother and uncle lived in the late 1970s. On a train to New York from Boston to start her hunt for apartments […]

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$500 to Apply for an Apartment? So Much for the $20 Cap

Within a few days of beginning her apartment hunt this summer, Natalie Miscolta-Cameron got lucky: She found a one-bedroom walk-up she could afford on East 96th Street in Manhattan. But she was surprised when the landlord’s broker asked her to pay a $100 application fee, followed by a $400 “processing fee,” even though such upfront […]

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WeWork Is Going Public. Are Its Numbers Too Private?

There’s a lot that the world’s hottest real estate company isn’t telling us as it prepares for its stock market debut. When WeWork released the paperwork this month for its initial public offering, investors finally had a chance to see how the company might be performing. WeWork is spending billions of dollars upfront to build […]

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Who’s to Blame When Algorithms Discriminate?

When the Fair Housing Act was passed in 1968, the injustice it aimed to root out in the housing market was often egregious: Real estate agents steered black families away from white neighborhoods; landlords refused to rent to them; and property managers’ racism was plainly stated in apartment listings. The culprits were clear and their […]

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When You Give Your House Keys to a Stranger

One Saturday afternoon in late May, I puzzled over my toilet seat, attempting to decipher the strange Hieroglyphics someone had drawn onto the porcelain surface using Sharpie marker. Or maybe waterproof mascara? Weeks earlier, my husband and I had listed our home for rent through a broker. We live in Cape May, a quaint Victorian […]

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A Gentler Way to Gentrify?

Don’t call the real estate development company Venn a developer. Its founders prefer “neighboring start-up.” And don’t call the company’s tenants, who are scattered across 20 buildings in the quickly gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick, renters. They are “members” or “Venners.” “We describe ourselves as a new way of living,” said Or Bokobza, the chief […]

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WeWork Takes Key Step Toward I.P.O., Citing Heady Growth and Huge Losses

WeWork, a real estate firm that leases shared office space, on Wednesday officially set in motion the process of becoming a publicly traded company by filing a financial prospectus with regulators. The offering by the company, which is led by a brash Israeli entrepreneur and backed by money from Saudi Arabia, will be a major […]

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