Tag: Urban Areas

Park It, Trucks: Here Come New York’s Cargo Bikes

Delivery trucks and vans laden with online packages are putting a stranglehold on New York City streets and filling its air with pollutants. Now a new city program aims to replace some of these delivery vehicles with a transportation mode that is more environmentally friendly and does not commandeer street space: electric cargo bikes. It […]

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She Wants to Row to Get From N.Y.C. Into College

Rainy-day practices are the worst, especially in the cold. As she leads her rowing team, Sebastiana Lopez feels the rain pelting her face, soaking her clothes and working its way into her bones. Her fingers go numb. Yet Lopez, 17, a high school senior, calls this the best thing she has ever done for herself. […]

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Why the Louisiana Governor’s Race Is So Close

METAIRIE, La. — The crucial cultural dividing line in Louisiana has always been north-south. Those who live in north Louisiana are mostly Protestant, speak with a familiar Southern twang and, in the modern era, voted heavily Republican. But rural South Louisiana is more Catholic, the accent is like nothing else (as anyone knows listening to […]

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Red and Blue Economies Are Heading in Sharply Different Directions

ImageThe economic challenges of blue metro areas like San Francisco — affordability and inequality — are different from those of red metros.Credit…Jason Henry for The New York Times At a quick glance, red and blue metropolitan areas are performing equally well on average in the most watched indicators of labor market health. Employment growth in […]

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How a Rooftop Meadow of Bees and Butterflies Shows N.Y.C.’s Future

Tall grasses glow in the afternoon sunlight. The last bees and butterflies of the season hover over goldenrod and asters. Silver orbs that look like alien spacecrafts shimmer nearby. The wild-looking meadow is not in a rural outpost, but sandwiched between a sewage plant — the orbs are the tanks — and a parking lot […]

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Their Land Became Part of Central Park. They’re Coming Back in a Monument.

In Central Park, about a mile from land that was once home to Seneca Village, a mostly black community forced out by the park’s creation in the 1850s, the city is planning a privately funded monument to a revered black family from that time. The new addition to New York’s landscape, honoring the Lyons family, […]

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The Immigrants Trump Denounces Have Helped Revive the Cities He Scorns

ImageChildren in Mexican folklore outfits braving Chicago weather for an “El Dia del Nino” parade in Pilsen in April.CreditAbel Uribe/Chicago Tribune, via Associated Press President Trump has turned repeatedly throughout his tenure and his re-election campaign to two targets: immigrants whom he has described as “invading” the country, and American cities he has called out […]

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The Man Who Rebuilt New Haven, Boston and Beyond

SAVING AMERICA’S CITIESEd Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban AgeBy Lizabeth Cohen Master city builders, like presidents, acquire reputations that veer back and forth as the generations pass. Georges-Eugène Haussmann, the man who gave us modern Paris, was reviled in his own time as a destroyer of community life and […]

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What Makes Us All Radically Equal

Around New Year’s 2017, a community organizer named Chris Lambert leased a soon-to-be-empty school building for $1 in one of Detroit’s poorer African-American neighborhoods. The plan was to pour $5 million into remodeling the building, take on the $1-million-a-year operating expenses and turn the place into a vibrant hub for the surrounding community, with nonprofits, […]

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Sydney Is for the Birds. The Bigger and Bolder, the Better.

SYDNEY — The bushy pair of laughing kookaburras that used to show up outside my daughter’s bedroom window disappeared a few months ago. The birds simply vanished — after rudely waking us every morning with their maniacal “koo-koo-kah-KAH-KAH” call, after my kids named them Ferrari and Lamborghini, after we learned that kookaburras mate for life. […]

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Trump Eyes Crackdown on Homelessness as Aides Visit California

WASHINGTON — President Trump is pushing aides to find ways to curtail the growing number of homeless people living on the streets of Los Angeles, part of broader discussions his aides have held for weeks about urban problems in liberal locales, according to his personal lawyer and administration officials. A team of administration officials is […]

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Uber Wants to Sell You Train Tickets. And Be Your Bus Service, Too.

DENVER — When Julia Ellis arrives at a train station in a Denver suburb to go to work, she opens her Uber app. Next to the ride-hailing options, she taps a train icon marked “Transit.” The click buys her a ticket for Denver’s public transit system, the Regional Transportation District. Ms. Ellis said she had […]

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‘It’s Like Watching New York Melt’: As Towers Rise, an Old Neighborhood Fades

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] Almost every week, Jeremy Schaller gets a call from a developer who wants to buy the two unremarkable four-story buildings that house Schaller and Weber, a German sausage and sauerkraut landmark on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. One […]

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How ‘Developer’ Became Such a Dirty Word

A 1906 drawing of the Empire Building in Denver.CreditLibrary of Congress The building itself, decades later.CreditLibrary of Congress The developers are coming. They’ve got the politicians in their pockets and the gaudy architectural plans in their hands. They will gorge on the entire city. And they won’t stop until peak profit has been wrung from […]

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Heat Waves in the Age of Climate Change: Longer, More Frequent and More Dangerous

Two thirds of the United States is expected to bake under what could be record high temperatures heading into the weekend. As a result, government agencies have issued warnings that can feel ominous. An “oppressive and dangerous heat,” warned the National Weather Service. “Excessive heat, a ‘silent killer’,” echoed a news release by the National […]

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Why Midsize Cities Struggle to Catch Up to Superstar Cities

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Within sight of a couple of huge brick smokestacks, looming witnesses to a past built on tobacco and powered by coal, there is something weirdly out of place about Wake Forest University’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine. It is run by Dr. Anthony Atala, lured to town 15 years ago from his perch […]

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Can States Just Say No to Corporate Giveaways?

No place better illustrates the absurdities of the proliferating use of tax incentives for job creation than the Kansas City metro area, which straddles the Missouri-Kansas state line. Over the past decade, Missouri and Kansas have offered more than $330 million in tax breaks to lure companies back and forth across State Line Road. More […]

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The ‘Texas Miracle’ Missed Most of Texas

LONGVIEW, Tex. — On the eastern plains of Texas, local leaders are trying to stop the bleeding of talent to the bright lights of Dallas and Austin. They are sprucing up downtown, completing 10 miles of walking trails, investing in parks and schools and making other improvements that they hope will entice young workers to […]

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