Tag: Mental Health and Disorders

Exercise May Boost Mood for Women With Depression. Having a Coach May Help.

For women with serious depression, a single session of exercise can change the body and mind in ways that might help to combat depression over time, according to a new study of workouts and moods. Interestingly, though, the beneficial effects of exercise may depend to a surprising extent on whether someone exercises at her own […]

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After Lobbying by Gun Rights Advocates, Trump Sounds a Familiar Retreat

WASHINGTON — Days after a pair of deadly mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, President Trump said he was prepared to endorse what he described as “very meaningful background checks” that would be possible because of his “greater influence now over the Senate and over the House.” But after discussions with gun rights advocates during […]

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White Officers Who Led Black Man on Rope Won’t Face Criminal Charges

Two white police officers who led a black man by a rope down a street in Galveston, Tex., this month will not face criminal charges, the authorities said on Sunday, resolving one of two outside inquiries into the officers’ conduct. The Galveston Police Department had asked the Texas Ranger Division of the state’s Department of […]

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Our Kids Do Not Need a Weight Watchers App

Weight Watchers — now rebranded as WW — has introduced an app called Kurbo, for children 8 to 17 years old. As a registered dietitian who specializes in helping people recover from disordered eating, I strongly recommend that parents keep this new tool — and any weight-loss program — away from their children. Our society […]

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We Have Ruined Childhood

According to the psychologist Peter Gray, children today are more depressed than they were during the Great Depression and more anxious than they were at the height of the Cold War. A 2019 study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology found that between 2009 and 2017, rates of depression rose by more than 60 […]

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Catching Waves for Well-Being

Agatha Wallen’s son, Mason, has autism, and when he was 7, she heard about an initiative in San Diego aimed at children with special needs. It involved an unlikely tool: a surf board. She wasn’t sure how it would work for her son, who struggled with behavioral and sensory issues. “Even getting the wet suit […]

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Why Mass Murderers May Not Be Very Different From You or Me

After a 21-year-old gunman massacred 22 people in an El Paso Walmart last week, President Trump declared that mass killers are “mentally ill monsters.” It was a convenient — and misleading — explanation that diverted public attention from a darker possibility behind such unimaginable horror: The killer might have been rational, just filled with hate. […]

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What Drives People to Mass Shootings?

On Monday morning, President Trump made his first televised statement about the mass murders committed over the weekend in El Paso, Tex., and Dayton, Ohio. He called for action to “stop mass killings before they start,” citing what he said were a number contributing factors: the contagious nature of mass murder; the glorification of violence […]

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A Long, Frustrated Push for Background Checks on Gun Sales

More than a half-century ago, the assassinations of a president, a senator and the nation’s foremost civil rights leader led to the passage of the Gun Control Act of 1968, a landmark measure that restricted some gun sales. But President Lyndon B. Johnson was not happy. He had wanted to require a registry for all […]

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Schizophrenia Runs in My Family. What Does That Mean for Me and My Baby?

On the morning of my 25th birthday, I looked at the wall calendar from my spot in bed, horizontal and snug beneath the covers. And I waited. I knew what turning 25 meant in my family. My mother, who has struggled with mental illness for the better part of her life, started hearing voices around […]

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How to Give Your Therapist Feedback

As with any relationship, patient and therapist unions aren’t immune to misunderstandings. When conflict appears, addressing it early on can help patients determine if the therapist and the therapy are right for them. We often think of psychotherapists as “all-knowing,” which can make patients feel that complaining about the therapy or the therapist is not […]

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The Army’s Message to Returning World War I Troops? Behave Yourselves

The shelling stopped on Nov. 11, 1918, sending millions of American soldiers back to the United States to pick up where they had left off before joining or being drafted into the war effort. For one officer, the return meant facing a perfunctory public welcome and superficial support. “The quick abandonment of interest in our […]

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Need Extra Time on Tests? It Helps to Have Cash.

The boom began about five years ago, said Kathy Pelzer, a longtime high school counselor in an affluent part of Southern California. More students than ever were securing disability diagnoses, many seeking additional time on class work and tests. A junior taking three or four Advanced Placement classes, who was stressed out and sleepless. A […]

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Fifth N.Y.P.D. Officer Since June Dies by Suicide, Police Say

A New York police officer was found dead at his Staten Island home on Saturday after shooting himself in what was the fifth police suicide in the city since June, officials said. Officials did not immediately release the officer’s name, rank or tenure with the department, however the Sergeants Benevolent Association said in a tweet […]

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It’s Not Just a Chemical Imbalance

The antidepressant Prozac came on the market in 1986; coincidentally, it was the year I was born. By the time I saw my first psychiatrist, as an early-2000s teenager, another half-dozen antidepressants belonging to the same class of drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or S.S.R.I.s, had joined it on the market — and in the […]

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‘I Should Be More Careful With Twitter’: Marianne Williamson on Those Mental Health Comments

When the self-help author Marianne Williamson appeared on the presidential debate stage last month, Twitter users delighted in unearthing her old comments about vibrations and “morphic” fields. But her performance also put a spotlight on much more serious comments about mental health. In books, interviews and posts on social media, Ms. Williamson has criticized the […]

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Need a Mental Health Day? Some States Give Students the Option

Depression and anxiety. The state of the country. Climate change. Mass shootings. Today’s students are grappling with a variety of issues beyond the classroom. To that end, lawmakers in two states have recently recognized the importance of the mental health of their students by allowing them to take sick days just for that. The measures […]

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Donny Hathaway’s Daughter Lalah Is Finally Ready to Honor Him in Concert

“I used to listen to Donny Hathaway records, and I would cry,” Lalah Hathaway said in a recent interview, and the reason wasn’t hard to discern — her father died in 1979, when he was 33 years old and she was just 10. What was mysterious to her was how his symphonic soul music and […]

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Depressed? Here’s a Bench. Talk to Me.

What disease in the world today disables the most people? By many measures, it’s depression — and that holds nearly everywhere, whether you live in Zimbabwe or the United States. In poor countries, virtually no one gets treatment. But even rich countries run short. A survey in 2013 and 2014 found that about half a […]

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