Tag: Mental Health and Disorders

At Talkspace, Start-Up Culture Collides With Mental Health Concerns

In 2016, Ricardo Lori was an avid user of Talkspace — an app that lets people text and chat with a licensed therapist throughout the day. A part-time actor in New York City, Mr. Lori struggled with depression and anxiety, and he credited the app with helping him get out of an abusive relationship. He […]

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Michelle Obama Says She Is Dealing With ‘Low-Grade Depression’

Michelle Obama said this week that she was experiencing “low-grade depression” and seemed to suggest that it was because of a combination of quarantine, racial unrest and the Trump administration’s response to the pandemic. In the second episode of her new podcast, which was released on Wednesday, Mrs. Obama, the former first lady, told the […]

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Five-Minute Coronavirus Stress Resets

In this emotional equivalent to an ultramarathon, it’s key to have some stress-reducing strategies available that work quickly and efficiently to help you hit the reset button. Here’s why: Struggling with chronic worry gets in the way of effectively managing your emotions. Unfortunately, many people who experience distress try to escape their unpleasant emotions by […]

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It’s Not Just You. We’ve All Got a Case of the Covid-19 Blues.

I am trying to think of when I first realized we’d all run smack into a wall. Was it two weeks ago, when a friend, ordinarily a paragon of wifely discretion, started a phone conversation with a boffo rant about her husband? Was it when I looked at my own spouse — one week later, […]

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Republicans Aid Kanye West’s Bid to Get on the 2020 Ballot

By Danny Hakim and Maggie Haberman At least three people who have been active in Republican politics are linked to Kanye West’s attempt to get on the presidential ballot this year. The connection raises questions about the aims of the entertainer’s effort and whether it is regarded within the G.O.P. as a spoiler campaign that […]

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Using Telemedicine to Treat Opioid Addiction

Covid-19 has made life much harder for people with opioid addiction. But the response to the virus has also revealed a way forward that could radically expand effective treatment and reduce overdose deaths. Until now, getting effective treatment depended on where you lived. Forty percent of American counties — much of Appalachia, for example — […]

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This Sledding Team Trained Hard for Gold in 2010. Some Members Regret It.

The chance to host the 2010 Winter Games was supposed to be a godsend for Canadian athletes who compete in skeleton, the headfirst sled run down a twisting track. While most competitors get access to the track for just a handful of days leading up to the Olympics, the host country gets to practice far […]

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Michael Phelps Documentary Criticizes U.S. Olympic Committee on Mental Health

The relationship between the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee and its most decorated Olympian, Michael Phelps, has been rocky for years. The more Phelps won, and did he ever win, racking up 28 Olympic medals across five Games, the more he became the organization’s poster child, worthy of whatever special treatment it could provide. […]

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Report Slams Doctor at V.A. for Dismissing Suicide Risk of Patient Who Later Killed Himself

WASHINGTON — The internal watchdog for the Department of Veterans Affairs said Tuesday that a veteran who came through the department’s medical center in Washington last year seeking psychiatric treatment died by suicide a few days later, after a doctor there ordered him forcibly removed and was heard saying that she did “not care” if […]

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With Eating Disorders, Looks Can Be Deceiving

Appearances, as I’m sure you know, can be deceiving. In one all-too-common example, adolescents and young adults with disordered eating habits or outright eating disorders often go unrecognized by both parents and physicians because their appearance defies common beliefs: they don’t look like they have an eating problem. One such belief is that people with […]

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When Grandparents Are Estranged From Their Grandchildren

For years, Pat Hanson composed letters, hundreds of them, to a granddaughter she wasn’t permitted to see or speak to. She described her travels, chatted about books and movies, envisioned a trip they’d one day take together to New York City. At first, she wrote by hand, storing her letters in a wooden box; later, […]

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Play Therapy Can Help Kids Speak the Unspeakable

Dee Ray doesn’t learn how children feel by listening to their words. Ray, a researcher and counselor in Texas, learns by watching them play. She directs the Center for Play Therapy at the University of North Texas and often works in schools, where she sections off a 10 feet by 10 feet area in a […]

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Where the Sick Get Sicker and the Sane Are Driven Mad: Behind Bars

WAITING FOR AN ECHO The Madness of American IncarcerationBy Christine Montross When Christine Montross approached the end of her residency program in psychiatry, she met with a mentor for help evaluating two attractive job opportunities. Ignoring both options, her adviser raised the possibility of a third: “What about the prisons?” Montross balked at this unsolicited, […]

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Disability Pride: The High Expectations of a New Generation

Listen to This Article Audio Recording by Audm To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. To get to her job as the communications director of a legal office in Philadelphia, Imani Barbarin gets in her car — when the coronavirus pandemic doesn’t require working […]

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Self-Care for Black Journalists

Heat flushed Natelegé Whaley’s body as she wrote a news article about the shooting by police that killed Breonna Taylor. Ms. Whaley, a journalist, figured she was tired. Then came the mental fog, digestive issues and blurred vision. When these seemingly separate issues snowballed into a panic attack and a trip to the emergency room […]

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What Happens When You’re Disabled but Nobody Can Tell

This article is part of a series exploring how the Americans With Disabilities Act has shaped modern life for disabled people. Share your stories or email us at ada@nytimes.com. Listen to This Article Computer-generated audio recording. I have depression and anxiety. These conditions are well-controlled most of the time, but when I have a significant […]

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Bright Outdoor Lights Tied to Less Sleep, More Anxiety in Teenagers

Artificial outdoor light at night may disrupt adolescents’ sleep and raise the risk for psychiatric disorders, a new study suggests. Researchers tracked the intensity of outdoor light in representative urban and rural areas across the country using satellite data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They interviewed more than 10,123 adolescents living in these […]

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‘I Couldn’t Do Anything’: The Virus and an E.R. Doctor’s Suicide

On an afternoon in early April, while New York City was in the throes of what would be the deadliest days of the coronavirus pandemic, Dr. Lorna M. Breen found herself alone in the still of her apartment in Manhattan. She picked up her phone and dialed her younger sister, Jennifer Feist. The two were […]

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How to Keep Good Habits Post-Lockdown

The coronavirus pandemic has brought with it a global economic downturn; unemployment in the United States has reached its highest level since the Great Depression, and many people whose jobs have not been outright eliminated have seen their work, and lives, radically transformed. But as old daily rituals are leveled, for better or worse, new […]

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How to Help Your Perfectionist Kid

ImageCredit…Daniel Savage One of my kids was showing signs of perfectionism before she could fully speak. It was clear to us she knew how to say more words than she would utter, but she wouldn’t say them aloud, or repeatedly, until she knew they were correct. In some ways, kids with perfectionist leanings are the […]

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How to Start Meditating

From the outside, meditation can look passive. You’re sitting still with your eyes closed, taking deep breaths. But anyone who has spent time meditating knows how active, and how intentional, it can be. In the stillness, your heart rate slows and your levels of cortisol — the hormone associated with stress — drop. A regular […]

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