Tag: Mental Health and Disorders

Surge of Student Suicides Pushes Las Vegas Schools to Reopen

This fall, when most school districts decided not to reopen, more parents began to speak out. The parents of a 14-year-old boy in Maryland who killed himself in October described how their son “gave up” after his district decided not to return in the fall. In December, an 11-year-old boy in Sacramento shot himself during […]

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Therapists Are on TikTok. And How Does That Make You Feel?

While an influx of followers can be confusing for therapists who are just looking to let off a little steam online, some view it as an opportunity to expand their client base. Marquis Norton, a licensed professional counselor in Hampton Roads, Va., posts under the TikTok account @drnortontherapy. (His bio reads: “CEO of therapy.”) He […]

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6 Months Later, Covid Survivors Plagued by Health Problems

Most symptoms in the Wuhan report were slightly more common among women, with 81 percent reporting at least one health problem, compared with 73 percent of men. Reports about other respiratory diseases, like the 2003 outbreak of SARS, another type of coronavirus, suggest that some Covid survivors may experience aftereffects for months or years. Most […]

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A New Tool in Treating Mental Illness: Building Design

Residents of the Taube Pavilion in Mountain View, Calif., wake up in private rooms with views of the wooded Santa Cruz Mountains, have breakfast in airy communal spaces and can hang out in landscaped courtyards throughout the day. It may sound like a resort, but the Taube Pavilion is a $98 million mental health facility […]

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‘Relapsing Left and Right’: Trying to Overcome Addiction in a Pandemic

Clients struggled with the loss of their in-person support groups. “What is more supportive than walking into a room and seeing a human you can touch?” asked one client, Maureen. “What’s been missing is body language, our ability to hug each other. All that stuff is important when people are going through the difficult experience […]

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Some Covid Survivors Haunted by Loss of Smell and Taste

Michele Miller, of Bayside, N.Y., was infected with the coronavirus in March and hasn’t smelled anything since then. Recently, her husband and daughter rushed her out of their house, saying the kitchen was filling with gas. She had no idea. “It’s one thing not to smell and taste, but this is survival,” Ms. Miller said. […]

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For a Healthier 2021, Keep the Best Habits of a Very Bad Year

Here’s a better way to start the new year: Skip the traditional January resolutions and make time for some New Year’s reflection instead. Take a moment to look back on the past 365 days of your life. Years from now, when you talk about 2020, what stories will you tell? Will it be clapping for […]

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How to Stay Connected and Fend Off Loneliness in the New Year

This pandemic year has left too many of us feeling isolated and lonely. As we head into 2021, here is some advice from Well on how to replace loneliness with opportunities for connection. How to Combat Pandemic Loneliness By Emily Sohn After months of lockdowns and shelter-in-place orders, some experts worry about a rise in […]

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What Can Be Learned From Differing Rates of Suicide Among Groups

It’s a much debated connection. A recent systematic review of studies found that attending religious service is not especially protective against suicidal ideation (thinking about or planning suicide), but it does protect against suicide attempts, and possibly protects against suicide. Other types of group activities may confer a similar sense of belonging. Volunteers with caregiving […]

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How the Pandemic Has Been Devastating for Children From Low-Income Families

Since the coronavirus arrived in her neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., this past spring, 11-year-old Grenderline Etheridge has burst into tears many times for reasons she cannot explain. She has crawled into bed with her mother, something she had not done for a very long time. Her siblings also have had trouble: Her brothers, who […]

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Small Number of Covid Patients Develop Severe Psychotic Symptoms

Brain scans, spinal fluid analyses and other tests didn’t find any brain infection, said Dr. Gabbay, whose hospital has treated two patients with post-Covid psychosis: a 49-year-old man who heard voices and believed he was the devil and a 34-year-old woman who began carrying a knife, disrobing in front of strangers and putting hand sanitizer […]

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Soothing Anxiety and Stress: Advice From the Year in Well

For many of us, 2020 was an exceptionally stressful year, dominated by fears about the coronavirus pandemic. Even with the vaccine on the horizon, we’re likely to need some stress management strategies to carry us into 2021. There’s lots of advice in this guide by Tara Parker-Pope, How to Be Better at Stress. Stress doesn’t […]

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Why Lisa Montgomery Shouldn’t Be Executed

Ms. Montgomery has bipolar disorder, temporal lobe epilepsy, complex post-traumatic stress disorder, dissociative disorder, psychosis, traumatic brain injury and most likely fetal alcohol syndrome. She was born into a family rife with mental illness, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. Ms. Montgomery’s mother, Judy Shaughnessy, claimed to have been sexually assaulted by her father. Ms. […]

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Man Who Killed 2 Black People at Kroger Gets Life Without Parole

A white man who fatally shot two Black people at a Kroger supermarket in Jeffersontown, Ky., in 2018 in a racially-motivated attack was sentenced this week to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At a court hearing on Tuesday, the gunman, Gregory Bush, pleaded guilty but mentally ill to the murders of Vickie […]

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Parenting With Agoraphobia Is Hard. It’s Harder in a Pandemic.

A few months later, when the second wave hit and we were once again told to stay home, my inner turmoil resumed: If home was my safest space, and places like the grocery store were unsafe, how would I ever manage to get outside again? According to Stacey Henson, a licensed clinical social worker and […]

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The Psychic Toll of a Pandemic Pregnancy

Kate Glaser had chalked up her exhaustion to being 39 weeks pregnant and having twin toddlers in the house. She also wondered whether her flulike symptoms were a sign that she was about to go into labor. But when she woke up one morning with a 100.4-degree fever, she called her doctor and got a […]

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I Achieved My Wildest Dreams. Then Depression Hit.

I’ve always been an extremely motivated person. “Alexi Pappas.” [BELL RINGING] And that mindset took me all the way to the Olympics. But it didn’t prepare me for what would be the greatest challenge of my life. After the Olympics, I was diagnosed with severe clinical depression, and it nearly cost me my life. But […]

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For Cameron Kinley and Navy, the Army Game Can Give 2020 a Highlight

Cameron Kinley, one of the captains of the Navy football team, read the text on his phone in late October and refused to believe it. A friend at the United States Military Academy had written that the Army-Navy game this year would not take place in Philadelphia, as usual. Instead, for the first time since […]

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The Hidden ‘Fourth Wave’ of the Pandemic

The mental health system is already struggling to keep up. In June, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 40 percent of American adults reported at least one adverse mental or behavioral health condition, including experiencing symptoms of mental illness or substance abuse related to the pandemic. The C.D.C. also reported that like […]

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We Can’t Ignore the Human Cost of Lockdowns

As the winter has deepened, the pandemic has surged. In the United States, case counts and hospitalizations are hitting and exceeding their highest points since the pandemic began. Countries across Europe have reinstated lockdowns and there are rumblings that states across the country could soon follow suit — some parts of California, for instance, have […]

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A Rare Pandemic Silver Lining: Mental Health Start-Ups

“It’s a crowded space,” Alex Katz, the founder of Two Chairs, which opened its doors with a single clinic in San Francisco in 2017, said of the mental health start-up scene. Nonetheless, he said, “because the problems are massive, we need a lot of great companies working in innovative ways to address the different populations, […]

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Alexi Pappas: Pro Sports Should Support Mental Health

I’ve always been an extremely motivated person. “Alexi Pappas.” [BELL RINGING] And that mindset took me all the way to the Olympics. But it didn’t prepare me for what would be the greatest challenge of my life. After the Olympics, I was diagnosed with severe clinical depression, and it nearly cost me my life. But […]

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Covid ‘Long-Haulers’ Need Medical Attention, Experts Urge

Dr. John Brooks, the chief medical officer of the C.D.C.’s Covid response, the co-chairman with Dr. Haag of one session, said he expected long-term post-Covid symptoms would affect “on the order of tens of thousands in the United States and possibly hundreds of thousands.” He added, “If you were to ask me what do we […]

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Building Emotional Safety Nets for Men

Many boys and men I interviewed for my book assured me they didn’t need support networks, because they had a close friend or two in whom they confided. What these boys and men ultimately sought from male friends wasn’t emotional support; they used what I call “targeted transparency” for solutions to the few, carefully vetted […]

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Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, Shares Her Miscarriage Grief

LONDON — Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, revealed in a deeply personal essay in the New York Times Opinion section on Wednesday that she had miscarried her second child with Prince Harry in July, bringing light to an experience shared by many grieving families who often suffer in silence. The steep challenges of 2020 — […]

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Happiness Won’t Save You

More than 40 years ago, three psychologists published a study with the eccentric, mildly seductive title, “Lottery Winners and Accident Victims: Is Happiness Relative?” Even if you don’t think you know what it says, there’s a decent chance you do. It has seeped into TED talks, life-hack segments on morning shows, even the occasional whiff […]

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Army Agrees to Review Thousands of Unfavorable Discharges for Veterans

The U.S. Army would review the cases of thousands of former soldiers who were separated from the service after Oct. 7, 2001, with less-than-honorable discharges and potentially upgrade their service paperwork to read “honorable,” under a settlement agreement filed this week in U.S. District Court in Connecticut. The agreement, which requires a judge’s approval, could […]

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Toronto’s Van Killing Case Goes to Trial

TORONTO — On a beautiful spring day, Cathy Riddell was making her way to the public library when she was slammed by a van plowing down the sidewalk. Her body flew into the air, and crashed down on a bus shelter, with glass “raining down on her,” a prosecutor explained at the opening of the […]

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How Parents Can Tame the Stress of Climate Crises

My 3-year-old awoke recently, chirping happily in her bed while it was still dark outside, so I was surprised to see that the clock read 7:45 a.m. Normally, the autumn sun in Northern California would be fairly high by that time. But ash and smoke from raging wildfires dimmed the sun — in what the […]

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