Tag: your-feed-science

3 Chimpanzees Kidnapped for Ransom From Congo Sanctuary

Two weeks ago, Roxane Chantereau, the co-founder of the JACK Primate Rehabilitation Center in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo, awoke before sunrise to the buzz of incoming WhatsApp messages. Someone had sent her a disturbing video showing two baby chimpanzees scuttering across a squalid dirt floor strewn with toppled furniture. The video panned across the […]

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Shy Raccoons Are Better Learners Than Bold Ones, Study Finds

“This is perhaps the first step towards domestication,” said Benjamin Geffroy, a biologist at the University of Montpellier in France. “Now we need to know more about what comes first, docility or cognitive abilities.” Some research suggests the process of domestication changes how animals think. Dogs, for example, are better than wolves or nonhuman primates […]

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New System Aims to Save Whales Near San Francisco From Ship Collisions

THE PACIFIC OCEAN NEAR SAN FRANCISCO — Fran washed ashore in August, some 25 miles south of the Golden Gate Bridge. The beloved and much-photographed female humpback whale had a broken neck, most likely the result of being hit by a ship. This latest instance of oceanic roadkill increased the tally of whales killed by […]

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Why Omicron Might Stick Around

Where is Pi? Last year, the World Health Organization began assigning Greek letters to worrying new variants of the coronavirus. The organization started with Alpha and swiftly worked its way through the Greek alphabet in the months that followed. When Omicron arrived in November, it was the 13th named variant in less than a year. […]

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Health Panel Recommends Anxiety Screening for All Adults Under 65

A panel of medical experts on Tuesday recommended for the first time that doctors screen all adult patients under 65 for anxiety, guidance that highlights the extraordinary stress levels that have plagued the United States since the start of the pandemic. The advisory group, called the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, said the guidance was […]

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The Godwit’s 7,000-Mile Journey: A Migration That Breaks Records

Tens of thousands of bar-tailed godwits are taking advantage of favorable winds this month and next for their annual migration from the mud flats and muskeg of southern Alaska, south across the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean, to the beaches of New Zealand and eastern Australia. They are making their journey of more than […]

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Physics Body Concedes Mistakes in Study of Missile Defense

The world’s largest body of physicists admitted on Monday that a report it had issued seven months ago contained errors that downplayed the effectiveness of a novel plan for shooting down missiles. The American Physical Society published the 54-page report in February. It assessed the overall feasibility of thwarting missile strikes and concluded that a […]

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This Acrobatic Hunting Trick Is Straight Out of the Spider-Verse

Spiders have no shortage of strategies to capture their prey. Some hunt in packs, others set traps and some even mimic the pheromones of their prey’s mate. But even so, less than 1 percent of spider species go after ants. The six-legged insects are fierce, and many are venomous adversaries with sharp, hedge-trimmer-like mandibles. That’s […]

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A Rural Doctor Gave Her All. Then Her Heart Broke.

But as the political climate around Covid-19 grew heated, and as some of Dr. Becher’s patients and neighbors began to dismiss the science, she became frustrated, then angry. She began to run more, sometimes twice a day, for hours at a time, “raging down the road.” She was mad about the widespread distrust of vaccines; […]

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How a Garbage-Bin War Schools Humans and Birds

Forget the space race. In Sydney, Australia, the innovation arms race is real. It’s between humans and sulfur-crested cockatoos, and the battle is over the trash. The cockatoos, which are native to Australia and frequent the suburbs, were already known to be trash-bin bandits. They open the lids using an innovative combination of prying up […]

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To Save Whales, Don’t Eat Lobster, Watchdog Group Says

American lobster may be a beloved and delicious splurge, but it is no longer a sustainable seafood choice and consumers should avoid eating it, according to Seafood Watch, a group that monitors how fish and other seafood are harvested from the world’s oceans. The organization made the announcement last week, motivated by concerns that the […]

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Unearthing a Maya Civilization That ‘Punched Above its Weight’

CHIAPAS, Mexico — On a bright, buggy morning in early summer, Charles Golden, an anthropologist at Brandeis University, slashed through the knee-high grass of a cattle ranch deep in the Valle de Santo Domingo, a sparsely populated region of thick brush and almost impenetrable jungle. Only the raucous half-roar, half-bark of howler monkeys pierced the […]

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With Drought, ‘Spanish Stonehenge’ Emerges Once Again

Although an Augustóbriga aqueduct, paved roads and thermal baths were sacrificed to the dam, a second-century A.D. temple, known as Los Mármoles (the Marbles), was dismantled stone by stone and reassembled on higher ground four miles away. The 20th-century inhabitants of the settlement were relocated, too. Since resurfacing in the summer of 2019, the Dolmen […]

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The Curious Hole in My Head

I barreled into the world — a precipitous birth, the doctors called it — at a New York City hospital in the dead of night. In my first few hours of life, after six bouts of halted breathing, the doctors rushed me to the neonatal intensive care unit. A medical intern stuck his pinky into […]

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Post-Roe Decision, Abortion Pill Providers Work to Broaden Access

That company, and others serving patients at 11 or 12 weeks’ gestation, can legally use medical discretion to do so because studies suggest that abortion pills are safe and effective at that stage. The World Health Organization supports medication abortion through 12 weeks’ gestation. Dr. Daniel Grossman, a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences […]

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A Volcano Erupted Without Warning. Now, Scientists Know Why.

Last year, one of the most dangerous volcanoes in Africa erupted without warning. In a way, Nyiragongo, a vertiginous volcano in the Democratic Republic of Congo, is always erupting: The mountain is crowned by a rare, persistent lava lake constantly fed by churning magma below. But on May 22, 2021, its molten innards found another […]

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How the Pandemic Shortened Life Expectancy in Indigenous Communities

Carol Schumacher, 56, who was raised in the remote community of Chilchinbeto in the Navajo Nation, has lost 42 family members to Covid-19 over the last two years. The dead included two brothers aged 55 and 54, and cousins as young as 18 and 19. Ms. Schumacher returned to the Navajo Nation from her home […]

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A Long-Lost Branch of the Nile Helped in Building Egypt’s Pyramids

For 4,500 years, the pyramids of Giza have loomed over the western bank of the Nile River as a geometric mountain chain. The Great Pyramid, built to commemorate the reign of Pharaoh Khufu, the second king of Egypt’s fourth dynasty, covers 13 acres and stood more than 480 feet upon its completion around 2560 B.C. […]

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US Life Expectancy Falls Again in ‘Historic’ Setback

The average life expectancy of Americans fell precipitously in 2020 and 2021, the sharpest two-year decline in nearly 100 years and a stark reminder of the toll exacted on the nation by the continuing coronavirus pandemic. In 2021, the average American could expect to live until the age of 76, federal health researchers reported on […]

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Humpback Whales Pass Their Songs Across Oceans

One of the most remarkable things about our species is how fast human culture can change. New words can spread from continent to continent, while technologies such as cellphones and drones change the way people live around the world. It turns out that humpback whales have their own long-range, high-speed cultural evolution, and they don’t […]

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Paxlovid Cuts Covid Deaths Among Older People, Israeli Study Finds

Paxlovid, the Covid-19 treatment made by Pfizer, reduced hospitalizations and deaths in older patients during the Omicron surge in Israel earlier this year, but made no difference for patients under 65 at high risk for severe disease, new research has found. The study is one of the first published examinations of the real-life effectiveness of […]

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How ‘the Most Vicious, Horrible Animal Alive’ Became a YouTube Star

SALT LAKE CITY — It was late in the day for muskrats to be out on Mill Creek, or at least the stretch that runs between a parking lot and a playground near the southern limits of the city. But there they were, two of them, one big and one small, paddling back and forth […]

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The Animal Translators

Learning to listen The prospect of ongoing, two-way dialogue with other species remains unknown. But true conversation will require a number of “prerequisites,” including matching intelligence types, compatible sensory systems and, crucially, a shared desire to chat, said Natalie Uomini, an expert on cognitive evolution at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. “There has […]

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Octopuses Don’t Have Backbones — or Rights

Lab rats have rights. Before researchers in the United States can experiment on the animals, they need approval from committees that ensure they follow federal regulations for housing and handling the creatures humanely. The same is true of scientists working with mice, monkeys, fish or finches. These protected animals share one thing in common: a […]

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This Is Not the Monkeypox That Doctors Thought They Knew

Early in the monkeypox outbreak, a man in his 20s arrived at an emergency department in Northern California, tiny blisters on his lips, hands and back. Within 12 hours, doctors diagnosed him with monkeypox. That’s where their certainty ended. The patient did not have fever, aches, weakness, pain or other symptoms typical of the disease. […]

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Your Doppelgänger Is Out There and You Probably Share DNA With Them

Charlie Chasen and Michael Malone met in Atlanta in 1997, when Mr. Malone served as a guest singer in Mr. Chasen’s band. They quickly became friends, but they didn’t notice what other people around them did: The two men could pass for twins. Mr. Malone and Mr. Chasen are doppelgängers. They look strikingly similar, but […]

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A Teen’s Journey Into the Internet’s Darkness and Back Again

Puberty hit C early — in the fourth grade — and hard: acne, breasts, attention, humiliation. C found refuge in the internet. Every night, often well past midnight, C lay in bed with an iPod Touch they received from their grandparents as a 10th birthday gift. (C, who is being identified by their first initial […]

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Pickleball, Sport of the Future Injury?

Then there’s the Kitchen. Its official name is the nonvolley zone, a seven-foot strip in front of the net on both sides. (An official pickleball court is 44 feet long and 20 feet wide.) Players are not allowed to step foot in the Kitchen, so when a ball heads there a player might bend forward […]

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How Chewing Shaped Human Evolution

Humans spend about 35 minutes every day chewing. That adds up to more than a full week out of every year. But that’s nothing compared to the time spent masticating by our cousins: Chimps chew for 4.5 hours a day, and orangutans clock 6.6 hours. The differences between our chewing habits and those of our […]

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Polio May Have Been Spreading in New York Since April

Polio may have been circulating widely for a year, and was present in New York’s wastewater as early as April, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A wastewater sample collected in April in Orange County, N.Y., tested positive for the virus, pushing back the earliest known detection in […]

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