Tag: your-feed-science

Drug Prices Are a Populist Campaign Issue. Here Are the Latest Proposals to Lower Costs.

It can be hard to find common ground in Washington these days, but furor over drug prices could be one exception. Many Americans continue to struggle to pay for the prescription medicines they need. And rising drug costs are a problem for insurers and taxpayers, too — treatments for some rare diseases are topping $2 […]

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In the Bronze Age, Bagels Were Tiny

Researchers exploring an archaeological site in Austria have found three pieces of 3,000-year-old charred bread that look suspiciously like the remains of little bagels. They are not complete rings — only parts of what were once ring-shaped pieces of dough. They were made from finely ground flour, but the scientists are not ready to claim […]

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Breast Milk Is Teeming With Bacteria — That’s Good for the Baby

In the earliest days after birth, millions of bacteria make their home in a baby’s body — in the skin, mouth and especially the gut. These immigrants come from the birth canal and the mother’s feces (during a vaginal birth), the mother’s skin and mouth as she holds and nuzzles the baby and perhaps even […]

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Eager to Limit Exemptions to Vaccination, States Face Staunch Resistance

As measles spread across the nation earlier this year, 71 residents of Vancouver, Wash., fell ill, most of them unvaccinated children. So state Rep. Paul Harris, a Republican representing the district, sponsored a measure to limit exemptions from immunization. Activists protesting the bill converged on his legislative office; the resulting chaos led security officers to […]

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Scientists Find Ancient Humans Used Weed 2,500 Years Ago, Too

An association between weed and the dead turns out to have been established long before the 1960s and far beyond a certain ur-band’s stomping grounds in San Francisco. Researchers have identified strains of cannabis burned in mortuary rituals as early as 500 B.C., deep in the Pamir mountains in western China, according to a new […]

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How Much Nature Is Enough? 120 Minutes a Week, Doctors Say

It’s a medical fact: Spending time outdoors, especially in green spaces, is good for you. A wealth of research indicates that escaping to a neighborhood park, hiking through the woods, or spending a weekend by the lake can lower a person’s stress levels, decrease blood pressure and reduce the risk asthma, allergies, diabetes and cardiovascular […]

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You Can Talk to Plants. Maybe You Should Listen.

What does a plant sound like? This is the sound of corn growing. The sound of corn growing From the exhibit “Sonic Succulents: Plant Sounds and Vibrations” at Brooklyn Botanic Garden. It’s also part of an art installation on display at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in New York through October. This veggie-lullaby plays from large, […]

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A French Wine With a 900-Year-Old Vintage

Savagnin blanc — not to be confused with the sauvignon blanc the sommelier recommended with your cheese course — is a fruity, acidic grape from the vine-encrusted hills of Jura, near France’s border with Switzerland. And if you visit and sip the region’s white wines today, you’ll be tasting the exact same grape, down to […]

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Diet for One? Scientists Stalk the Dream of Personalized Nutrition

A decade ago, spurred by the success of the Human Genome Project and the affordability of genetic sequencing, scientists began to explore the promise of “nutrigenomics.” Could personalized nutrition, informed by knowledge of an individual’s DNA, help prevent and even treat diet-related diseases? The results of early studies from Harvard, Stanford and elsewhere were compelling: […]

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To Map a Coral Reef, Peel Back the Seawater

Coral reefs comprise just 1 percent of the ocean floor yet they are home to 25 percent of the world’s marine fish, a growing source of protein for people. But reefs are imperiled by a range of threats including warming waters, acidifying seas, destructive fishing methods, and agricultural and other runoff. Moreover, scientists have only […]

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The Vampire Birds of the Galápagos Have Fascinating Inner Lives

For half the year, a little brown bird on the northernmost islands of the Galápagos uses its wickedly sharp beak to pick at seeds, nectar and insects. But when the climate dries out, it drinks blood. Yes, there is such a thing as a vampire finch. Yes, it is what it sounds like. Galápagos finches […]

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Fish Cannons, Koi Herpes and Other Tools to Combat Invasive Carp

Why is someone loading a fish into a tube? That’s Whooshh. It’s a high-tech fish removal system, something like a cross between a potato gun and a pneumatic tube at a drive-in bank. And that fish is a common carp, one the oldest and most invasive fish on the planet. [Like the Science Times page […]

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Elephants May Sniff Out Quantities With Their Noses

Elephants keep surprising us. They live complex social lives, cooperate, show altruism and grieve their dead. And now in the latest evidence of their sophisticated cognitive abilities, elephants appear to be able to distinguish relative amounts of food merely by smell, researchers say. The finding, reported Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, […]

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Why Crocodiles Are Not Just Living Fossils

On bright mornings in the tropics, crocodiles haul themselves out of the water to bask in the sun. Like other reptiles, they rely on its warmth to help fuel their metabolisms. This might seem to be a vision from a prehistoric world: sluggish creatures unchanged for millenniums. But evidence is building that modern crocodiles differ […]

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Warning of ‘Pig Zero’: One Drugmaker’s Push to Sell More Antibiotics

Facing a surge in drug-resistant infections, the World Health Organization issued a plea to farmers two years ago: “Stop using antibiotics in healthy animals.” But at last year’s big swine industry trade show, the World Pork Expo in Des Moines, one of the largest manufacturers of drugs for livestock was pushing the opposite message. “Don’t […]

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Who Were the Ancestors of Native Americans? A Lost People in Siberia, Scientists Say

A skeleton in Siberia nearly 10,000 years old has yielded DNA that reveals a striking kinship to living Native Americans, scientists reported on Wednesday. The finding, published in the journal Nature, provides an important new clue to the migrations that first brought people to the Americas. “In terms of peopling of the Americas, we have […]

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Meet the Deep-Sea Dragonfish. Its Transparent Teeth Are Stronger Than a Piranha’s.

Unassuming dragonfish lurk in the twilight zone, more than 1,600 feet under the surface of the ocean. Dark, eel-like, and roughly three and a half inches long, these deep-sea creatures glow with bioluminescence and have evolved a complex sensory system that allows them to detect even the subtlest movements in the ocean’s shadowy realms, then […]

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Solving a Leafy Mathematical Mystery

Next time you go outside, take a minute to look at your local leaf arrangements. You’ll probably notice a few different patterns. In basil plants, each leaf is about 90 degrees — a quarter-turn — from the last, a template called “decussate.” A visualization of a decussate leaf pattern. The redder the coloring, the stronger […]

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Deadly Falls in Older Americans Are Rising. Here’s How to Prevent Them.

As the population ages, the number of older Americans who die following a fall is rising. A study published Tuesday in the medical journal JAMA found that for people over 75, the rate of mortality from falls more than doubled from 2000 to 2016. Researchers analyzed information obtained from death certificates maintained by the federal […]

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