Tag: your-feed-science

Juul Suspends Online Sales of Flavored E-Cigarettes

Juul Labs announced Thursday that it would temporarily halt online sales of flavored e-cigarettes like mango, products the company had already stopped distributing to retail stores as public outrage mounted over the soaring rate of teenage vaping. Facing multiple federal and state investigations into its marketing practices, Juul said it decided to discontinue the sales […]

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Drug Giants Pursuing $50 Billion Settlement of Opioid Cases

CLEVELAND — As a critical trial deadline bears down, lawyers for states and the three largest drug distributors in the country, along with two manufacturers, have agreed on a framework for a deal to resolve thousands of opioid cases with a settlement worth nearly $50 billion in cash and addiction treatments. Three people familiar with […]

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It Had the Biggest Antlers Ever Found. Were They Weapons?

The antlers of the prehistoric deer Megaloceros giganteus inspire awe and bemusement in equal measure. They were the largest the world has ever known — up to 12 feet wide and five feet high — atop the head of a creature otherwise no taller than a modern moose. But when does such grandeur cross the […]

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This Fungus Mutates. That’s Good News if You Like Cheese.

The legend of Camembert is one of daring escape and dairy espionage. The cheese was invented in 1791 when a priest from Brie (yes, like the cheese), took shelter with a dairymaid, Marie Harel, as he fled France’s anticlerical government. He taught her to make cheese with an edible rind, as local lore tells it. […]

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The Amelia Earhart Mystery Stays Down in the Deep

For two weeks in August, a multimillion-dollar search from air, land and sea sought to solve the 80-year mystery of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance. Robert Ballard, the ocean explorer famous for locating the wreck of the Titanic, led a team that discovered two hats in the depths. It found debris from an old shipwreck. It even […]

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E-Cigarettes Went Unchecked in 10 Years of F.D.A. Inaction

In 2009, not long after Dr. Margaret Hamburg became commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, a package arrived at her home. Inside was a clunky device called an e-cigarette. “It was my first exposure to this emerging, new technology,” Dr. Hamburg recalled. The package was sent by an antismoking activist as a warning about […]

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In the Sea, Not All Plastic Lasts Forever

A major component of ocean pollution is less devastating and more manageable than usually portrayed, according to a scientific team at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, Mass., and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previous studies, including one last year by the United Nations Environment Program, have estimated that polystyrene, a ubiquitous plastic […]

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The Twitch That Helps Your Intestines Grow

In the grayscale of a laboratory video, the little tubes squirm. They pulse as waves of contraction travel along their length — they almost seem to dance as the squeezing stretches them rhythmically. And, curiously, they grow. CreditCreditBy Chevalier Et Al These tubes are individual lengths of intestine, taken from a chicken embryo. And what […]

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A Virus in Koala DNA Shows Evolution in Action

Koalas have been running into hard times. They have suffered for years from habitat destruction, dog attacks, automobile accidents. But that’s only the beginning. They are also plagued by chlamydia and cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, and in researching those problems, scientists have found a natural laboratory in which to study one of the hottest […]

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What Was Kept in This Stone Age Meat Locker? Bone Marrow

Sealed for millenniums, Qesem Cave in central Israel is a limestone time capsule of the lives and diets of Paleolithic people from 420,000 to 200,000 years ago. Inside, ancient humans once butchered fresh kills with stone blades and barbecued meat on campfires. “It was believed that early hominins were consuming everything they could put their […]

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Nobel Prize in Chemistry Honors Work on Lithium-Ion Batteries

John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of lightweight lithium-ion batteries, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday in Stockholm. “Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized our lives and are used in everything from mobile phones to laptops and electric vehicles,” the […]

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Johnson & Johnson Hit With $8 Billion Jury Verdict in Risperdal Suit

A Philadelphia jury on Tuesday hit Johnson & Johnson with an $8 billion verdict over its marketing of the anti-psychotic drug Risperdal, siding with a Maryland man who argued that the health care giant downplayed risks that the drug could lead to breast growth in boys. The verdict in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas […]

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Was Heidi the Octopus Really Dreaming?

Heidi the octopus is sleeping. Her body is still, eight arms tucked neatly away. But her skin is restless. She turns from ghostly white to yellow, flashes deep red, then goes mottled green and bumpy like plant life. Her muscles clench and relax, sending a tendril of arm loose. If you haven’t seen this video […]

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Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded for Studies of Earth’s Place in the Universe

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three scientists who transformed our view of the cosmos. James Peebles, a professor emeritus at Princeton University, shared half of the prize for theories that explained how the universe swirled into galaxies and everything we see in the night sky, and indeed much that we cannot […]

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Online Map Leads Archaeologist to Maya Discovery

Until recently, archaeology was limited by what a researcher could see while standing on the ground. But light detection and ranging, or lidar, technology has transformed the field, providing a way to scan entire regions for archaeological sites. With an array of airborne lasers, researchers can peer down through dense forest canopies or pick out […]

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The Veterinarian Will See Your Dinosaur Now

Dinosaurs loom large in the human imagination, towering above the treetops, bringing down prey and reigning over the ancient land, sea and sky. In real life, though, things weren’t always so spectacular. A paper published last week in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B by Les Hearn, a retired science teacher, and Amanda Williams, […]

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Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded to 3 for Work on Cells

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was jointly awarded to three scientists — William G. Kaelin Jr., Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza — for their work on how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability. The Nobel Assembly announced the prize at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm on Monday. BREAKING NEWS:The 2019 […]

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Brain Stimulation Shows Promise in Treating Severe Depression

For more than a decade, doctors have been using brain-stimulating implants to treat severe depression in people who do not benefit from medication, talk therapy or electroshock sessions. The treatment is controversial — any psychosurgery is, given its checkered history — and the results have been mixed. Two major trials testing stimulating implant for depression […]

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What Rolls Like an Armadillo but Lives in the Sea?

Why did the chiton roll into a ball? “To get to the other side,” said Julia Sigwart, an evolutionary biologist at Queens University Belfast in Northern Ireland. About 500 million years ago, a couple species of now extinct trilobites became the first animals to roll themselves into a ball for protection. The trilobite’s living doppelgänger […]

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