Tag: your-feed-science

A Honeybee’s Tongue Is More Swiss Army Knife Than Ladle

For a century, scientists have known how honeybees drink nectar. They lap it up. They don’t lap like cats or dogs, videos of whose mesmerizing drinking habits have been one of the great rewards of high speed video. But they do dip their hairy tongues rapidly in and out of syrupy nectar to draw it […]

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How a Fruit in Your Garden Gets Its Shiny Blue Color

Big, leafy viburnum bushes have lined yards in the United States and Europe for decades — their domes of blossoms have an understated attractiveness. But once the flowers of the Viburnum tinus plant fade, the shrub makes something unusual: shiny, brilliantly blue fruit. Scientists had noticed that pigments related to those in blueberries exist in […]

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For Doctors of Color, Microaggressions Are All Too Familiar

When Dr. Onyeka Otugo was doing her training in emergency medicine, in Cleveland and Chicago, she was often mistaken for a janitor or food services worker even after introducing herself as a doctor. She realized early on that her white male counterparts were not experiencing similar mix-ups. “People ask me several times if the doctor […]

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When Bugs Crawl Up the Food Chain

Epomis beetle larvae look delicious to frogs. They’re snack-size, like little protein packs. If a frog is nearby, a larva will even wiggle its antennae and mandibles alluringly. But when the frog makes its move, the beetle turns the tables. It jumps onto the amphibian’s head and bites down. Then it drinks its would-be predator’s […]

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How to Move Your Elephant During a Pandemic

The border between Argentina and Brazil had been closed by the coronavirus pandemic for nearly two months when, in early May, an unusual convoy approached the checkpoint in Puerto Iguazú. There were 15 people, all of whom had gone days with little sleep, and six vehicles, including a crane and a large truck. Behind the […]

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C.D.C. Closes Some Offices Over Bacteria Discovery

The nation’s foremost public health agency is learning that it is not immune to the complex effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told employees that some office space it leases in the Atlanta area would be closed again after property managers of the buildings discovered Legionella, the bacteria […]

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New York Is Positioned to Reopen Schools Safely, Health Experts Say

New York State, the center of the worst coronavirus outbreak in the world four months ago, is now one of the few places in the country that may be able to safely reopen schools, several public health experts said after Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo gave districts permission to do so. Mr. Cuomo announced Friday that […]

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A Star Went Supernova in 1987. Where Is It Now?

It was one of the great fireworks displays of recent cosmic history. On Feb. 23, 1987, Earth time, a massive star blew apart right in front of the world’s astronomers, strewing ribbons and rings of glowing gas across the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy on the doorstep of the Milky Way. Today a smoke […]

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Why the Coronavirus is More Likely to ‘Superspread’ Than the Flu

For a spiky sphere just 120 nanometers wide, the coronavirus can be a remarkably cosmopolitan traveler. Spewed from the nose or mouth, it can rocket across a room and splatter onto surfaces; it can waft into poorly ventilated spaces and linger in the air for hours. At its most intrepid, the virus can spread from […]

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Need to Take the MCAT? You’ll Still Have to Do It in Person

Students applying to graduate schools can take the GRE, the LSAT and other tests at home this year because of the risks of gathering in an exam room for hours during the pandemic. But applicants sitting for the longest and arguably most grueling graduate entrance exam, the Medical College Admission Test, do not have that […]

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The Coronavirus Is New, but Your Immune System Might Still Recognize It

Eight months ago, the new coronavirus was unknown. But to some of our immune cells, the virus was already something of a familiar foe. A flurry of recent studies has revealed that a large proportion of the population — 20 to 50 percent of people in some places — might harbor immunity assassins called T […]

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Even Asymptomatic People Carry the Coronavirus in High Amounts

Of all the coronavirus’s qualities, perhaps the most surprising has been that seemingly healthy people can spread it to others. This trait has made the virus difficult to contain, and continues to challenge efforts to identify and isolate infected people. Most of the evidence for asymptomatic spread has been based on observation (a person without […]

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Why Chimp Moms Flock to Caves on the Savanna

Everyone needs to cool off on a scorching summer day, even chimpanzees. Where do the primates go on sizzling days when woodlands and forests don’t provide respite from the heat? Caves. But not just any chimps. New research shows that on Senegal’s savannas, home to a population of chimpanzees that has long fascinated scientists for […]

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As Trump Praises Plasma, Researchers Struggle to Finish Critical Studies

An American Airlines flight took off from La Guardia Airport in New York last Wednesday morning, carrying 100 pouches of blood plasma donated by Covid-19 survivors for delivery to Rio de Janeiro. American scientists are hoping Covid-19 patients in Brazil will help them answer a century-old question: Can this golden serum, loaded with antibodies against […]

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Does Blood Plasma Work for Covid-19 Patients? No One Knows.

An American Airlines flight took off from La Guardia Airport in New York last Wednesday morning, carrying 100 pouches of blood plasma donated by Covid-19 survivors for delivery to Rio de Janeiro. American scientists are hoping Covid-19 patients in Brazil will help them answer a century-old question: Can this golden serum, loaded with antibodies against […]

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How to Think Like an Epidemiologist

There is a statistician’s rejoinder — sometimes offered as wry criticism, sometimes as honest advice — that could hardly be a better motto for our times: “Update your priors!” In stats lingo, “priors” are your prior knowledge and beliefs, inevitably fuzzy and uncertain, before seeing evidence. Evidence prompts an updating; and then more evidence prompts […]

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Forget Spas and Bars. Hotels Tout Housekeeping to Lure Back Travelers.

When Beau Phillips checked into a hotel near Toledo recently, a table in front of the counter barricaded him from getting too close to the clerk, who wore a mask and stood behind a plastic window. “The key is gently tossed at you from three feet away,” said Mr. Phillips, a public affairs executive who […]

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Scientists Uncover Biological Signatures of the Worst Covid-19 Cases

Scientists are beginning to untangle one of the most complex biological mysteries of the coronavirus pandemic: Why do some people get severely sick, whereas others quickly recover? In certain patients, according to a flurry of recent studies, the virus appears to make the immune system go haywire. Unable to marshal the right cells and molecules […]

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There Are Two Ways Out of a Frog. This Beetle Chose the Back Door.

It’s a familiar story: Predator hunts prey. Predator catches prey. Predator gulps down prey. Usually, that’s it. But the water scavenger beetle Regimbartia attenuata says, “Not today.” After getting swallowed by a frog, this plucky little insect can scuttle down the amphibian’s gut and force it to poop — emerging slightly soiled, but very much […]

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Can Humans Give Coronavirus to Bats, and Other Wildlife?

Many people worry about bats as a source of viruses, including the one that has caused a worldwide pandemic. But another question is surfacing: Could humans pass the novel coronavirus to wildlife, specifically North American bats? It may seem like the last pandemic worry right now, far down the line after concerns about getting sick […]

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The Coronavirus Infected Hundreds at a Georgia Summer Camp

As schools and universities plan for the new academic year, and administrators grapple with complex questions about how to keep young people safe, a new report about a coronavirus outbreak at a sleepaway camp in Georgia provides fresh reasons for concern. The camp implemented several precautionary measures against the virus, but stopped short of requiring […]

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Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline Snag Biggest Coronavirus Vaccine Deal Yet

The French drug maker Sanofi said on Friday that it had secured an agreement of up to $2.1 billion to supply the U.S. federal government with 100 million doses of its experimental coronavirus vaccine, the largest such deal announced to date. The arrangement brings the Trump administration’s investment in coronavirus vaccine projects to more than […]

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The Romans Called it ‘Alexandrian Glass.’ Where Was It Really From?

Glass was highly valued across the Roman Empire, particularly a colorless, transparent version that resembled rock crystal. But the source of this coveted material — known as Alexandrian glass — has long remained a mystery. Now, by studying trace quantities of the element hafnium within the glass, researchers have shown that this prized commodity really […]

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Lizard Popsicles, Anyone?

Stephan Halloy was conducting surveys on plants and wildlife on the high plateaus around San Miguel de Tucumán in northwestern Argentina in the 1970s when he first encountered lizard Popsicles. The mountains around the Argentine city climb rapidly to elevations of 13,000 to 16,400 feet, packing a multitude of ecological niches into a relatively small […]

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Aboard the Diamond Princess, a Case Study in Aerosol Transmission

In a year of endless viral outbreaks, the details of the Diamond Princess tragedy seem like ancient history. On Jan. 20, one infected passenger boarded the cruise ship; a month later, more than 700 of the 3,711 passengers and crew members had tested positive, with many falling seriously ill. The invader moved as swiftly and […]

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Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds

It has been a comforting refrain in the national conversation about reopening schools: Young children are mostly spared by the coronavirus and don’t seem to spread it to others, at least not very often. But on Thursday, a study introduced an unwelcome wrinkle into this smooth narrative. Infected children have at least as much of […]

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Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 Vaccine Protects Monkeys, Study Finds

An experimental coronavirus vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson protected monkeys from infection in a new study. It is the second vaccine candidate to show promising results in monkeys this week. The company recently began a clinical trial in Europe and the United States to test its vaccine in people. It is one of more […]

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Old Vaccines May Stop the Coronavirus, Study Hints. Scientists Are Skeptical.

Billions of dollars are being invested in the development of vaccines against the coronavirus. Until one arrives, many scientists have turned to tried-and-true vaccines to see whether they may confer broad protection, and may reduce the risk of coronavirus infection, as well. Old standbys like the Bacille Calmette-Guerin tuberculosis vaccine and the polio vaccine appear […]

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Whence Came Stonehenge’s Stones? Now We Know

Back in the 30s — the 1130s — the Welsh cleric Geoffrey of Monmouth created the impression that Stonehenge was built as a memorial to a bunch of British nobles slain by the Saxons. In his “Historia Regum Britanniae,” Geoffrey tells us that Merlin, the wizard of Arthurian legend, was enlisted to move a ring […]

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