Tag: your-feed-science

C.D.C. Officials Warn of Coronavirus Outbreaks in the U.S.

The coronavirus almost certainly will begin spreading in communities in the United States, and Americans should begin preparations now, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Tuesday. “It’s not so much of a question of if this will happen anymore but rather more of a question of exactly when this will […]

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Health Officials Warn of Coronavirus Outbreaks in the U.S.

The coronavirus almost certainly will begin spreading in communities in the United States, and Americans should begin preparations now, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Tuesday. “It’s not so much of a question of if this will happen anymore but rather more of a question of exactly when this will […]

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This Tiny Creature Seemed Extinct. DNA Technology Helped Prove It Wasn’t.

Just a few years ago, it seemed like the scarce yellow sally stonefly had gone locally extinct. In 1995, ecologists collected a single specimen of the aquatic insect in the River Dee near the Wales-England boundary, the species’ only known refuge. For the next two decades, every survey there failed to find another of the […]

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In Delaware, Dams Are Being Removed to Spur Fish Migration

WILMINGTON, Del. — When migratory fish follow their ancestral instinct to swim up Delaware’s Brandywine Creek during this spring’s spawning season, they will find, for the first time in more than 200 years, that their route is not blocked by a dam. The fish — American shad, hickory shad and striped bass — have been […]

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Coronavirus Cases in the United States Reach 34, and More Are Expected

At least 34 people in the United States are infected with the new coronavirus spreading from China, federal health officials said on Friday. Thirteen of the infections were diagnosed in travelers who fell ill after returning from overseas, and 21 in people “repatriated” by the State Department. More infections are expected among the people who […]

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Microbes Point the Way to Shipwrecks

Off the coast of Mississippi, under 4,000 feet of water, a luxury yacht is slowly disintegrating. Marine creatures dart, cling and scuttle near the hull of the wreck, which has been lying undisturbed for 75 years. But there’s more than meets the eye when it comes to this shipwreck and others, researchers have now shown […]

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To Prevent Next Coronavirus, Stop the Wildlife Trade, Conservationists Say

The coronavirus spreading from China has sickened at least 73,000 people and killed at least 2,000, setting in motion a global health emergency. But humans aren’t the only species infected. Coronaviruses attack a variety of birds and mammals. The new virus seems to have leapt from wildlife to humans in a seafood and meat market […]

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White-Lipped Peccary Species May Be in Steep Decline

White-lipped peccaries travel in large packs throughout the forest. The hairy, pig-like creatures emit a distinctive musky smell that is not easy to forget, and play a crucial role in their ecosystems, dispersing seeds and creating habitats for insects and amphibians. Now, though, the species is facing a crisis. A recent study published in the […]

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The Further Adventures of Betelgeuse, the Fainting Star

Betelgeuse, the red supergiant star that marks the armpit of Orion the Hunter, has been dramatically and mysteriously dimming for the last six months. Some astronomers and excitable members of the public have wondered if the star is about to explode as a supernova. Others have suggested more prosaic explanations, involving long-term cycles of variability, […]

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They Wanted Research Funding, So They Entered the Lottery

A few years ago, Anna Ponnampalam did something out-of-the-box. She entered a lottery. But she wasn’t buying scratch-off tickets promising cash for life. She was trying to win funding for her medical research. Her application wasn’t successful. All proposals go through an initial quality and eligibility check, which hers did not pass; those that get […]

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Here Lies the Skull of Pliny the Elder, Maybe

Pliny the Elder’s skull — or more accurately, his alleged skull — reposes in ghoulish splendor at the Museo Storico Nazionale Dell’Arte Sanitaria in Rome, a treasure trove of medical curiosities. The cranium has ruminated for decades in a display case, amid pathological and anatomical anomalies such as malformed fetuses and pickled liver stones. Scholars […]

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As Mating Rituals Go, Valentine’s Day Isn’t So Bad

Come Valentine’s Day, some people may wonder to themselves, “Is this the only way to find a mate?” And the answer is no. There are many ways to find one. But be careful what you wish for. Evolution has produced all manner of surprising interactions that enable reproduction in nature. Compared to these four unusual […]

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A Growing Presence on the Farm: Robots

FARMER CITY, Illinois — In a research field off Highway 54 last autumn, corn stalks shimmered in rows 40-feet deep. Girish Chowdhary, an agricultural engineer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, bent to place a small white robot at the edge of a row marked 103. The robot, named TerraSentia, resembled a souped up […]

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You Didn’t Touch These Jellyfish, but They Can Sting You With Tiny Grenades

Jellyfish are very sneaky about stinging. Most are silent. Some have venom that kicks in on a time delay. Many species even manage to get in a few zingers after they’re dead. But according to research published Thursday in Communications Biology, the stealthiest stinging strategy belongs to Cassiopea xamachana, a species of upside-down jellyfish found […]

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Time is Still a Mystery to ‘Einstein’s Dreams’ Author

“Did you ever think you would be so old?” The question startled me. If anyone knew where the time goes, I would have expected it to be the man across the lunch table, Alan Lightman. Dr. Lightman is best known in literary circles for his 1992 novel, “Einstein’s Dreams,” which is all about the vicissitudes […]

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Coronavirus Cases Seemed to Be Leveling Off. Not Anymore.

The news seemed to be positive: The number of new coronavirus cases reported in China over the past week suggested that the outbreak might be slowing — that containment efforts were working. Stocks ticked upward in the United States, as some analysts declared it safe again to invest in companies that depend on China. But […]

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This Rodent Was Giant. Its Brain Was Tiny.

When you look at a reconstruction of the skull and brain of Neoepiblema acreensis, an extinct rodent, it’s hard to shake the feeling that something’s not quite right. Huddled at the back of the cavernous skull, the brain of the South American giant rodent looks really, really small. By some estimates, it was around three […]

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Ghost DNA Hints at Africa’s Missing Ancient Humans

Scientists reported on Wednesday that they had discovered evidence of an extinct branch of humans whose ancestors split from our own a million years ago. The evidence of these humans was not a fossil. Instead, the researchers found pieces of their DNA in the genomes of living people from West Africa. Arun Durvasula and Sriram […]

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Huge Shelters for Coronavirus Patients Pose New Risks, Experts Fear

As the new coronavirus continued to spread unabated within the city of Wuhan, China, government officials last week imposed draconian measures. Workers in protective gear were instructed to go to every home in the city, removing infected residents to immense isolation wards built hastily in a sports stadium, an exhibition center and a building complex. […]

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Sugary Drink Consumption Plunges in Chile After New Food Law

Four years after Chile embraced the world’s most sweeping measures to combat mounting obesity, a partial verdict on their effectiveness is in: Chileans are drinking a lot fewer sugar-laden beverages, according to study published Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks dropped nearly 25 percent in the 18 months after Chile adopted […]

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