Tag: World War II (1939-45)

A Filmmaker Explored Japan’s Wartime Enslavement of Women. Now He’s Being Sued.

TOKYO — When Miki Dezaki decided to make a documentary for his graduate thesis, he examined a question that reverberates through Japanese politics: Why, 75 years later, does a small but vocal group of politically influential conservatives still fervently dispute internationally accepted accounts of Japan’s wartime atrocities? Specifically, Mr. Dezaki focused on what historians call […]

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Climate Change Is Not World War

When Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Senator Edward Markey of Massachusetts introduced their Green New Deal proposal in February, they chose language loaded with nostalgia for one of the country’s most transformative historical moments, urging the country to undertake “a new national, social, industrial and economic mobilization on a scale not seen since […]

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Edda Servi Machlin, 93, Champion of Italian Jewish Cuisine, Dies

Edda Servi Machlin, who survived the harrowing World War II years in Italy by hiding out with anti-Fascist partisans, then immigrated to the United States and wrote a definitive cookbook on Italian Jewish food, died on Aug. 16 at her home in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. She was 93. Her daughter Gia Machlin […]

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World War II and the Ingredients of Slaughter

World War II began 80 years ago this Sunday after Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a “nonaggression” pact that was, in fact, a mutual aggression pact. Adolf Hitler invaded Poland on Sept. 1, 1939. Russia’s invasion of Poland, no less murderous, followed two weeks later. On Nov. 3 of that year, Joseph Goebbels, […]

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Sale of Rare Nazi-Era Porsche Sputters After Sotheby’s Auction Blunder

As the curtains parted, the frenzied car aficionados raced to get out their smartphones to capture the moment for posterity. Several of them cheered. They had come to see Lot No. 362, the much-heralded Porsche Type 64, a swooping Nazi-era roadster that was built by the automaker Ferdinand Porsche nine years before he founded his […]

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Where the Resistance Helped Plan the Liberation of Paris

The tunnel to the subterranean bunker that played a pivotal role in the liberation of Paris is long and narrow, each step down deceptively steep. It takes 100 of those steps to reach the former military command post where, for six days, members of the French Resistance helped orchestrate the city’s release from the Nazi […]

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The Forgotten Story of Operation Anvil

Winston Churchill once quipped that George C. Marshall, the famed American general who served as Army chief of staff during World War II, was part of the “stupidest strategic team ever seen.” The cause of the British prime minister’s ire? Operation Anvil (later renamed Dragoon), the Allied invasion of southern France that began 75 years […]

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‘First’ Porsche Heads to Auction, and a Record Price Is Expected

The road race was going to speed along Germany’s new Autobahn, into the Austrian Alps and on to Rome, through the new heart of fascist Europe. To maximize the propaganda value of the affair — in part marking the Nazis’ 1938 alliance with Italy and the absorption of Austria — the German entry in the […]

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Dorothy Olsen, a Pioneering Pilot in World War II, Dies at 103

As a teenager envisioning the vast world beyond her family’s small farm in Oregon, Dorothy Olsen was mesmerized by “The Red Knight of Germany,” Floyd Gibbons’s 1927 biography of Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the German World War I ace. “Young blood, hot and daring, raced through their veins,” Gibbons wrote, “even as the winged steeds […]

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Commemorating the End of World War II

You’re reading this week’s At War newsletter. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox every Friday. Email us at atwar@nytimes.com. We’re less than five months away from 2020, the year that will mark the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. There will be many commemorations: the liberation of the […]

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The Exhibit Lauded Freedom of Expression. It Was Silenced.

TOKYO — It was an exhibit meant to celebrate freedom of expression. Instead, freedom of expression was shut down. A long, bitter battle between Japan and South Korea over historical memory and atonement spilled over into the art world over the weekend when organizers of an international fair in Japan closed an exhibition that featured […]

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‘The Terror’ Summons the Ghosts of a Real-Life Horror Story

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — The best horror stories tell us something about ourselves. A zombie horde stands in for toxic conformity, a monster for unconquerable grief. But not every scary story is an allegory. One of the scariest the actor George Takei ever heard was a true one about his own life. He just didn’t […]

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Putin’s Fancy Weapons? Everything Old Is New Again

Vladimir Putin’s Russia has openly embarked on an aggressive rearmament. The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty is dead (broken by Russia, then canceled by President Trump), the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty is near death, and scarcely a month goes by without the Russian Ministry of Defense or President Putin himself boasting of a new game-changing miracle […]

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Winston Churchill Would Despise Boris Johnson

Winston Churchill’s ghost still hovers over Washington and London. American presidents have often modeled themselves after the British wartime leader, especially in times of conflict. George W. Bush was a great admirer. And so in the buildup to the Iraq war, Prime Minister Tony Blair lent him a bust of Churchill, while another one, which […]

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Hitler Looted the Art, Then They Looted Hitler

Chaos reigned in the bomb-ravaged streets of Munich on April 29, 1945. American troops were closing in. Hitler was a day away from killing himself in his bunker in Berlin. The Nazi guards who protected important buildings had fled. Hungry crowds stormed the Führerbau, the Führer’s building. First they looted the food, the liquor and […]

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U.S. Navy Ship Sunk in World War II by German Sub Is Found Off Maine Coast

For nearly 75 years, the circumstances surrounding the sinking of the U.S.S. Eagle PE-56, a World War II Navy ship, eluded historians and relatives of the lost sailors. Even its location was unknown. This week, searchers announced that the missing warship had been discovered five miles off the coast of Maine and 300 feet beneath […]

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Overlooked No More: Else Ury’s Stories Survived World War II. She Did Not.

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Melissa Eddy BERLIN — What stood out was the thick, white “U” of her last name, which had been carefully painted on a brown leather suitcase that was loaded, along with the belongings of 1,190 […]

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