Tag: Native Americans

Leading Museums Remove Native Displays Amid New Federal Rules

The American Museum of Natural History will close two major halls exhibiting Native American objects, its leaders said on Friday, in a dramatic response to new federal regulations that require museums to obtain consent from tribes before displaying or performing research on cultural items. “The halls we are closing are artifacts of an era when […]

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What Is ‘Settler Colonialism’?

In the intense war of words over the Israel-Gaza war, a particular phrase has popped up repeatedly. At protests, on fliers and in some mainstream publications, it is common to see Israel described — or more likely, assailed — as a “settler-colonial” state. The concept of settler colonialism originates in academia, where its use has […]

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N.Y. Reconsiders Capitol Artworks That Offend Native Americans

At an informal gathering last summer at the Executive Mansion in Albany, N.Y., Gov. Kathy Hochul shared an anecdote about making an unpleasant discovery there, not long after taking residence: a painting depicting the marriage of Pocahontas. The governor thought Pocahontas looked young and frightened, and had the painting removed. In its place went what […]

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For the Lakota, Creativity Thrives Where’s There No Word for Art

There is no word for art in the Lakota language. But the power of art, in every facet of life, has drawn a boisterous group of moccasin beaders, painters, regalia artists and producers of Native hip-hop down a two-lane road that undulates through the tawny hills of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, eight miles from […]

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This Tribe Got Their “Land Back.” But It’s No Longer Livable.

Despite how small, remote, and economically challenged the village is, Durham sees the Homeland Act as a key player in the country’s environmental and cultural healing. Death Valley is the only case in which the U.S. government has returned park land to its Indigenous inhabitants. Much of the opposition to the Homeland Act was on […]

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They Lost Their Land to the Park Service. Now They’re Losing It to Climate Change.

Despite how small, remote, and economically challenged the village is, Durham sees the Homeland Act as a key player in the country’s environmental and cultural healing. Death Valley is the only case in which the U.S. government has returned park land to its Indigenous inhabitants. Much of the opposition to the Homeland Act was on […]

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They Lost Their Land to the Park Service. Now They’re Losing It to Climate Change.

Despite how small, remote, and economically challenged the village is, Durham sees the Homeland Act as a key player in the country’s environmental and cultural healing. Death Valley is the only case in which the U.S. government has returned park land to its Indigenous inhabitants. Much of the opposition to the Homeland Act was on […]

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What ‘Pocahontas’ Tells Us About Disney, for Better and Worse

Recent Disney films like the animated “Strange World,” with its gay teenage protagonist, have become cultural flash points. But “Pocahontas” prompted a full-blown fracas. Some people accused Disney of whitewashing history — for leaving out the fact, for instance, that Pocahontas died at 21, perhaps of smallpox, after being taken to London and paraded around […]

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U.S. Rate of Suicide by Firearm Reaches Record Level

The rate of suicides involving guns in the United States has reached the highest level since officials began tracking it more than 50 years ago, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The rate increased by more than 10 percent in 2022 compared with 2019, and in some racial […]

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How Modern-Day Thanksgiving Obscures Holiday’s Tragic Legacy Of Violence Against Native Americans

NewsOne Featured Video Painting by J.L.M. Ferris of the first Thanksgiving ceremony with Native Americans and the Pilgrims in 1621. Undated illustration. | Source: Bettmann / Getty This year marks the 402nd anniversary of the first Thanksgiving in New England. Remembered and retold as an allegory for perseverance and cooperation, the story of that first […]

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What Is Unthanksgiving Day?: Spotlighting 500 Years Of Native Resistance To Colonialism

NewsOne Featured Video The Teo Kali, an Aztec cultural group, participates in a sunrise “Unthanksgiving Day” ceremony with Native Americans on Nov. 24, 2005, on Alcatraz Island. Kara Andrade/AFP via Getty Images Each year on the fourth Thursday of November, when many people start to take stock of the marathon day of cooking ahead, Indigenous […]

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Montauketts’ Bid for N.Y. State Recognition Is Vetoed for the 5th Time

For years, a Native American tribe from the picturesque East End of Long Island has fought bitterly for formal state recognition, a designation that was stripped away more than a century ago by court decisions that are now widely considered racist. The New York State Legislature passed a bill four times in a decade to […]

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Chickasaw astronaut ‘signs’ patches for Native American girls’ Space Camp fund

The first enrolled member of a Native American tribe to fly into space is helping inspire a new generation of Native American girls to possibly to do the same with a limited edition emblem that celebrates their shared heritage and his time as a NASA astronaut. John Herrington, who flew on a 2002 space shuttle […]

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They Wanted to Get Sober. They Got a Nightmare Instead.

The white vans were the first thing people noticed. They began popping up around tribal reservations in the Southwest a few years ago, trolling through alleys and parking lots on a hunt for new business. They approached anyone who looked homeless or intoxicated with an alluring pitch: Get in, and we’ll give you shelter, sobriety […]

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Infant Deaths Have Risen for the First Time in 20 Years

The number of American babies who died before their first birthdays rose last year, significantly increasing the nation’s infant mortality rate for the first time in two decades, according to provisional figures released Wednesday by the National Center for Health Statistics. The spike is a somber manifestation of the state of maternal and child health […]

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Connor Bedard’s Hype (and Jersey) Take Over Chicago Blackhawks

Before Connor Bedard had laced up his skates for a regular season game, the 18-year-old hockey phenom had already caused a surge in the Chicago Blackhawks’ season ticket sales. He had fans talking about a return to glory for a team that had fallen on hard times. And he was drawing audacious comparisons to some […]

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Cherokee Tribe Shares Native American Knowledge in North Carolina

Countless generations of Cherokee Indians have cultivated lands in the shadow of the Smoky Mountains. More people want to learn from them. WHY WE’RE HERE We’re exploring how America defines itself one place at a time. Cherokee, N.C., is a town steeped in Native American history, and a draw for outsiders in search of connection. […]

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“Navajo Police: Class 57” Takes a Long Look at an Impossible Job

It’s hard to escape the thought that the police are part of the cycle of violence. At the close of its second episode, Class 57 splices together footage of recruits being hazed and learning hand-to-hand combat with an introduction in what to expect on the job from victims of domestic violence (to begin the seminar, […]

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Native American Lacrosse Team May Not Be Eligible for the 2028 L.A. Olympics

At major lacrosse events, a team of Native Americans called the Haudenosaunee plays alongside countries like the United States, Canada and Australia. The team has been competitive, winning three bronze medals in the men’s competition at the world championships, including one this year. And why not? Native Americans invented lacrosse centuries ago. Now lacrosse has […]

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Gallego Is Counting on Native Voters to Compete in Arizona Senate Race

State Highway 86 stretches west from Tucson, Ariz., past saguaros and desert peaks into Tohono O’odham Nation, the second largest reservation in the state. It is a road that tribal members say no Senate candidate in recent memory has ventured down. But on a sweltering afternoon, Representative Ruben Gallego, a progressive Democrat from Phoenix, spent […]

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Energy Firms, Green Groups and Others Reach Deal on Solar Farms

Solar developers, environmentalists, farming groups and tribal organizations said on Thursday that they had reached an agreement that could make it easier in the United States to build large solar farms, which have attracted stiff opposition in some places. The agreement seeks to address some thorny land-use and biodiversity issues that often stymie power projects […]

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Saturday’s Solar Eclipse Illuminates Traditions of Indigenous Peoples

On Oct. 14, an annular eclipse will make its way across the Western Hemisphere. The moon, farther from Earth than during a total eclipse, will block much of our view of the sun, leaving only a fiery halo of light in a darkened sky. In the United States, the show begins in Oregon, then cuts […]

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Indigenous Peoples Day Is A Reminder Of A Violent Past Endured By Native Americans

NewsOne Featured Video The first encounters between European settlers and Native Americans are captured on a wood engraving in this 1888 image. DigitalVision Vectors For the third year, the United States will officially observe Columbus Day alongside Indigenous Peoples Day on Oct. 9, 2023. In 2021, the Biden administration declared the second Monday in October […]

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Indigenous Peoples’ Day: Things You Wouldn’t Have Without Native Americans

NewsOne Featured Video Source: grandriver / Getty UPDATED: 9:30 a.m. ET., Oct. 9 Indigenous Peoples’ Day finally allows us to highlight Native Americans and their contributions to American society. On Oct. 8, 2021, Joe Biden became the first president to acknowledge the holiday declaring it a national holiday, which we now celebrate on the second […]

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What Is Indigenous Peoples’ Day and How Is It Celebrated?

Two years after President Biden became the first U.S. president to formally commemorate Indigenous Peoples’ Day, more than a dozen states recognize some version of the holiday in lieu of Columbus Day. More than 100 cities have adopted the holiday, choosing to heed calls from Indigenous groups and other activists not to celebrate Christopher Columbus, […]

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Tribal Judge Rules in Favor of Citizenship for Descendants of Creek Slaves

A judge for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation in Oklahoma ruled that descendants of Black people who were enslaved by the tribe are eligible for tribal citizenship, nullifying a change to the tribe’s Constitution that had expelled Black members from the nation 44 years ago. Judge Denette Mouser of the tribe’s District Court ruled on Wednesday […]

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