Tag: Native Americans

We Didn’t Stand a Chance Against Opioids

My ancestors had no written language, so they told their stories to the trees. Ten thousand years after the Tlingit people settled Alaska’s southeastern archipelago, these islands remain stippled with monuments to their myths: totem poles, carved from massive logs of cedar and adorned with images of animals and spirits, rise up from the damp […]

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The Governor, the Seneca Nation and the Completely Rotten Highway

CATTARAUGUS INDIAN RESERVATION, N.Y. — If ever you wanted a tangible symbol of the execrable relationship between Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and New York’s largest Native American tribe, it is the three miles of cracked, rutted and completely rotten highway running through this lakeside reservation. The highway, Interstate 90, is so deteriorated that federal authorities […]

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IT: Chapter Two and the Great American Tradition of Selling Native Spirituality

There’s laziness, there’s racism, and there’s lazy racism. About 45 minutes into IT: Chapter Two, which remained atop the box office last weekend, the three-hour movie reveals it’s aiming for the latter.  For this sequel to the 2017 film, Argentinian director Andrés Muschietti was tasked with interpreting an epic, and epically weird, work. Like with most adaptations, there was […]

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Dior Finally Says No to Sauvage

ImageA frame from the Christian Dior “We Are the Land” fragrance film. A stubbled white loner in a serape, a deep ocean blue shirt and multiple beaded chains and bracelets stares moodily at desert landscape lit by the blood reds of sunset. A Native American in classic regalia dances atop a mesa. A girl in […]

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2020

Remember that Beer Test? It’s not enough. That’s why this election season, we bring you: Still Processing’s Rubric for Leadership and Democratic Excellence. ImageDemocratic candidates take the debate stage on July 31, 2019.CreditPaul Sancya/Associated Press Discussed this week: Astead Herndon, Jon Caramanica and Jon Pareles. “What Do Rally Playlists Say About the Candidates?” (The New […]

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A State Wrestles With Its Imagery: A Sword Looming Over a Native American

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — When former State Representative Byron Rushing first looked closely at the Massachusetts state seal, he could not believe his eyes. Created in the 19th century, the official seal, which appears on the state flag, depicts a colonist’s arm brandishing a sword above the image of a Native American. It includes a Latin […]

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Who Gets to Say If Warren’s Apology to Cherokee Nation Is Enough?

On Tuesday, Politico published two pieces about Senator Elizabeth Warren’s tumultuous DNA test. One featured Native voices and served as an interesting insight into the still-ongoing criticism of Warren’s controversial decision; the other was a tired piece that dredged up establishment GOP and Democratic strategists to contemplate all the kinds of Beltway questions that people […]

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Cherokee Nation Seeks to Send First Delegate to Congress

For Native American tribes, treaties with the United States government have often led to displacement, removal and outright erasure. But now, the Cherokee Nation is turning to treaties signed in the 18th and 19th centuries to push for a delegate to Congress for the first time in history. The treaties, the Nation claims, promised them […]

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Upriver From a Senator’s Lake House, an Oklahoma Town Fights for Survival

MIAMI, Okla. — On the shimmering waters of Grand Lake, a popular vacation spot in northeastern Oklahoma, families have spent the summer splashing around in boats, fishing for the lake’s famous bass and enjoying weekend getaways at upscale waterfront homes. But drive just a few dozen miles north, and the festivity dissolves into fear over […]

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Cherokee Nation is Coming to Congress

On Thursday, Cherokee Nation (CN) Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. held a press conference to officially announce his intention to exercise the tribe’s treaty right to appoint a delegate to the United States House of Representatives. Alongside Hoskin was his proposed candidate, Kimberly Teehee, a former advisor to President Barack Obama and by all accounts […]

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David Koch Is Gone, But His Pipelines Are Here to Stay

David Koch, the marginally less-vile of the vile duo known as the Koch Brothers, is dead. Setting aside the fact that Charles was always the more powerful and, as a result, the more interesting of the two, the death of his brother allows for a moment to consider a world without either of them. It […]

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Indian Country Fights to Protect Its Children and Preserve Its Sovereignty

As president of both the Quinault Nation and the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, Fawn Sharp is a busy person. As of late, much of her time has been dedicated to the fight for Native children and, more broadly, tribal sovereignty. Sharp knows firsthand how difficult it is for Native parents hoping to provide a […]

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Democrats Are Getting Very Serious About the Native American Vote

What do the 573 federally recognized nations of American Indians and Alaska Natives all have in common? A never-ending need for lawyers. The Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum held this week in Sioux City, Iowa, at which 11 presidential candidates fielded questions from indigenous elected officials and activists, was a rousing two-day argument for […]

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Elizabeth Warren Apologizes at Native American Forum: ‘I Have Listened and I Have Learned’

SIOUX CITY, Iowa — Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, speaking at a presidential forum on Native American issues on Monday, offered a direct, public apology for the “harm” that she caused and pledged to uplift Native people as president. Ms. Warren was met with a standing ovation when she took the stage, and she began […]

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Indian Country Is Finally Getting the Political Attention It Deserves

It took 243 years, but the path to the United States presidency, or at least the Democratic nomination, will run through Indian Country. On August 19 and 20, eight presidential candidates will descend on Sioux City, IA, to participate in the Frank Lamere Native Presidential Forum. The two-day event, named after the late member of […]

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Elizabeth Warren Offers a Policy Agenda for Native Americans

WASHINGTON — Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts on Friday laid out a collection of policy proposals intended to help Native Americans, pledging to protect tribal lands and to bolster funding for programs that serve Native people. In releasing the proposals, Ms. Warren is drawing attention to Native American issues after months of largely refraining from […]

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San Francisco School Board Votes to Hide, but Not Destroy, Disputed Murals

In a compromise that did not appear to end the fight, the San Francisco Board of Education voted Tuesday night to conceal, but not destroy, a series of Depression-era school murals that some considered offensive to Native Americans and African-Americans. The 4-to-3 vote, which came after a tense and emotional meeting, nullified the board’s earlier […]

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From the Country’s New Poet Laureate, Poems Reclaiming Tribal Culture

AN AMERICAN SUNRISEPoemsBy Joy Harjo In June, after decades as a significant presence for poetry readers, Joy Harjo was named United States poet laureate. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, she’s the first indigenous poet to hold the post. This is overdue, and political: a reminder to those who view America as a white […]

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The Case for Keeping San Francisco’s Disputed George Washington Murals

After half a century of intermittent debate and protest, the San Francisco Board of Education voted unanimously in June to whitewash the 13 murals depicting the life of George Washington that line the halls of a high school named for the first president. The murals’ offense is that they depict some ugly truths about the […]

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