Tag: Agriculture and Farming

They’re Smelly and Spiky, and They Need Bats to Pollinate Them

Known as the world’s smelliest fruit, durians are also essential to the farming economy of Indonesia. Although repulsive to many Western noses — some compare the smell to rotting trash — durians command the highest unit price of any fruit in Indonesia, with an export value of more than $250 million in 2013. Hoping to […]

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The French Fries Are Doing Just Fine

A potato paucity is upon us, and French fry aficionados are worried. Multiple news headlines this week have warned of a “possible French fry shortage” this year after a weaker harvest for many potato farmers in the United States and Canada. But experts say French fry consumers probably shouldn’t worry too much, because producers of […]

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Hemp or Pot Farm? Police and Thieves Can’t Always Tell

SALEM, N.Y. — She planted her spring crops at the family farm, following the same steps as her ancestors did as they farmed the land for seven generations. She tilled the soil, sowed the seeds, irrigated the earth and waited for the bushy green hemp plants to sprout. Then Iris Rogers did something her farmer […]

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How Racism Ripples Through Rural California’s Pipes

TEVISTON, Calif. — Bertha Mae Beavers remembers hearing stories as a child about the promises of California, a place so rich with jobs and opportunity that money, she was told, “grew on trees.” So in the summer of 1946 she said goodbye to her family of sharecroppers in Oklahoma and set out for a piece […]

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Turning Farm Workers Into Farmers

SALINAS, Calif. — The Salinas Valley is known for its enormous industrial farms that grow produce like lettuce and broccoli. But just southeast of the city of Salinas, a patchwork of much smaller organic fruit and vegetable fields breaks the industrial sprawl. Start-up farmers tend these fields morning, afternoon and night. When the sun sets, […]

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‘Evo Morales Is Like a Father to Us’

VILLA TUNARI, Bolivia — The road to Evo Morales’s political stronghold, in the heart of Bolivia’s coca farming region, is nearly impassable these days. First, tires and wooden crates block the way, forcing travelers to stop and negotiate with supporters of Mr. Morales, the ousted Bolivian president, who have cut off access to the region. […]

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A Teacher, an Artist, a Scientist and More. They’re All Visionaries.

One wanted to be a professional basketball player. Another wanted to be a dancer. And someone else wanted to be an astronaut. They all ended up making impacts in different careers. For our series on Visionaries, The Times interviewed 12 people who are taking risks and working to change the world. ______ Technology visionary: Jeri […]

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A Wet Year Causes Farm Woes Far Beyond the Floodplains

The damage from the destructive spring flooding in the Midwest has been followed in parts of the country by a miserable autumn that is making a bad farming year worse, with effects that could be felt into next spring. Even the widespread flooding in the spring was worse for many farmers than the images of […]

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Trump’s Made-for-TV Trade War Has Few Entertained

When President Trump’s advisers suggested that Beijing resume buying around $20 billion in American farm products as part of a trade deal, Mr. Trump wasn’t satisfied. In a dramatic public retelling in the Cabinet Room, he said he pressed his team to more than triple that figure, then trimmed that a little and asked for […]

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A Director Asks, Would Jesus Stand With Today’s Migrants?

MATERA, Italy — For his cinematic retelling of the story of Jesus Christ, “The New Gospel,” the Swiss-born, Belgium-based director Milo Rau sought answers to some questions: What would Jesus preach in the 21st century? Who would he stand with? What would he fight for? Mr. Rau found one answer in contemporary Italy, where his […]

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Can a Company Be Virtuous and Profitable? Nestlé Says Yes

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — Mark Schneider, the chief executive of the Swiss food giant Nestlé, gripped a bun-clad concoction that looked like a bacon cheeseburger but contained no actual bacon, cheese or beef. He took a bite. It was a faux-meat, dairy-free mouthful symbolizing what may be the future of the food industry. It was also […]

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Jordan Reclaims Land Israelis Used Under ’94 Peace Accord

AMMAN, Jordan — Jordan’s king on Sunday reclaimed border lands that Israel was allowed access to under a 1994 peace treaty reached between the neighboring countries. Jordanians applauded the step but for many Israelis, the failure to negotiate an extension of the border area-land access was disappointing, and attested to the sorry state of relations […]

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On Hawaii, the Fight for Taro’s Revival

ImageThe taro fields of the Waipa Foundation, on the north shore of the island of Kauai. The foundation focuses on ecological restoration.Credit…Scott Conarroe The root vegetable was a staple food for centuries until contact with the West. Its return signals a reclamation of not just land but a culture — and a way of life. By […]

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One Thing You Can Do: Know Your Organic Food

Welcome to the Climate Fwd: newsletter. The New York Times climate team emails readers once a week with stories and insights about climate change. Sign up here to get it in your inbox. ImageCredit…Tyler Varsell By Eduardo Garcia Demand is booming for organic food. From 2013 to 2018, sales increased nearly 53 percent to almost […]

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Eastern Europe’s Populist Scam

What is galling is how openly Prime Minister Viktor Orban does it, blaming the European Union for every imagined indignity or interference in Hungary’s affairs, while milking billions from Brussels to enrich his cronies and prop up his illiberal rule. He is not alone, as a Times investigation of the bloc’s lavish farm subsidies demonstrates […]

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Surviving Droughts, Tornadoes and Racism

“There are easier ways to make a living than farming,” Greg Bridgeforth said as he drove a combine through fields he farms in northern Alabama. “But this is what I truly love to do — till the soil and grow things, just like my father, grandfather and great-grandfather did. You know, when problems get you […]

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E.U. Defends Farm Subsidy Program Exploited by Autocrats

BRUSSELS — European Union officials, questioned about new revelations of corruption and exploitation of the bloc’s farm subsidies, said Monday that outright fraud was very rare and that auditors swiftly rooted it out. But they also acknowledged that law enforcement often fell to the same national leaders who warp the system — and benefit from […]

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Farm Country Feeds America. But Just Try Buying Groceries There.

WINCHESTER, Ill. — John Paul Coonrod had a banana problem. The only grocery store in his 1,500-person hometown in central Illinois had shut its doors, and Mr. Coonrod, a local lawyer, was racing to get a community-run market off the ground. He had found space in an old shoe store, raised $85,000 from neighbors and […]

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Stalking the Endangered Wax Palm

In 1991 Rodrigo Bernal, a botanist who specializes in palms, was driving into the Tochecito River Basin, a secluded mountain canyon in central Colombia, when he was seized by a sense of foreboding. Two palm experts were in the car with Dr. Bernal: his late wife, the botanist Gloria Galeano, who worked alongside him at […]

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Pénzes gazdák: hogyan fejik meg az Európai Uniót az oligarchák és a populisták.

CSÁKVÁR, Magyarország — A kommunizmus idején földművesek dolgoztak ennek a Budapesttől nyugatra fekvő városnak messze nyúló határában, búzát és kukoricát aratva annak az államnak, amely elvette a földjüket. Manapság az ő gyermekeik dolgoznak itt új kényuraknak, oligarchák egy csoportjának és a politika kegyeltjeinek, akik a földhöz homályos ügyleteken keresztül jutottak a magyar kormány jóvoltából. A […]

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The Money Farmers: How Oligarchs and Populists Milk the E.U. for Millions

CSAKVAR, Hungary — Under Communism, farmers labored in the fields that stretch for miles around this town west of Budapest, reaping wheat and corn for a government that had stolen their land. Today, their children toil for new overlords, a group of oligarchs and political patrons who have annexed the land through opaque deals with […]

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