Tag: Brain

The High Price of Multitasking

Not only do smartphones provide unprecedented access to information, they provide unprecedented opportunities to multitask. Any activity can be accompanied by music, selfies or social media updates. Of course, some people pick poor times to tweet or text, and lawmakers have stepped in. Forty-eight states have banned texting while driving. In Honolulu, it’s illegal to […]

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Stored in Synapses: How Scientists Completed a Map of the Roundworm’s Brain

The tiny, transparent roundworm known as Caenorhabditis elegans is roughly the size of a comma. Its entire body is made up of just about 1,000 cells. A third are brain cells, or neurons, that govern how the worm wriggles and when it searches for food — or abandons a meal to mate. It is one […]

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‘Guilty’ Pleasures? No Such Thing

We know them when we see them: The TV shows and movies we love, even though we just know they’re bad. The trashy books we simply can’t put down. The awful earworms we hate to love. Yes, these are our guilty pleasures — what some people consider the junk food in our media diets. But […]

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‘It’s Gigantic’: A New Way to Gauge the Chances for Unresponsive Patients

Doctors have known for years that some patients who become unresponsive after a severe brain injury nonetheless retain a “covert consciousness,” a degree of cognitive function that is important to recovery but is not detectable by standard bedside exams. As a result, a profound uncertainty often haunts the wrenching decisions that families must make when […]

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Do Brain Injuries Affect Women Differently?

In 1994, the National Football League formed a Committee on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to study an alarming trend: Players were retiring early because of what seemed to be concussion-related problems, including persistent headaches, vertigo, cognitive impairment, personality changes, fatigue and difficulty performing ordinary daily activities. Around the same time, Eve Valera, then a Ph.D. […]

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Psychology Around the Net: June 8, 2019

Enjoy! Rainbow: A First Book of Pride: This month, the American Psychological Association spotlights Rainbow: A First Book of Pride, a “must-have primer for young readers” and “sweet ode to rainbow families, and an affirming display of a parent’s love for their child and a child’s love for their parents.” Author Michael Genhart, PhD is […]

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The N.F.L. Has Been Consumed by the Concussion Issue. Why Hasn’t the N.H.L.?

The day after Mother’s Day was the eighth anniversary of the death of N.H.L. player Derek Boogaard. As usual, his mother, Joanne, spent a quiet day of reflection at home in Regina, Saskatchewan, and continued a tradition of writing a letter to her dead son to be published in the Regina Leader-Post. This year’s letter […]

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Why Gulping Down a Cold Drink Feels So Rewarding

After a long hike on a hot day, few things are more rewarding than a tall, frosty glass of water. The rush of pleasure that comes with a drink might feel like a sign from your body that you’ve done the right thing, a reward for remedying your dehydration. But that pleasing sensation isn’t actually […]

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Fighting the Gender Stereotypes That Warp Biomedical Research

Say you are prescribed medication for depression, anxiety or even just to sleep. Would you want to take it if you knew that the drug had only been tested on men and male animals? Rebecca Shansky, a neuroscientist at Northeastern University in Boston, thinks you might not. When she tells nonscientific audiences that researchers “for […]

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I’m a Veteran Without PTSD. I Used to Think Something Was Wrong With Me.

A few years ago, my husband, Chris, who survived four deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, was killed by an avalanche in Colorado. I am an Army veteran who was deployed to combat zones twice, in 2005 and 2008, without any serious lingering psychological ramifications. But I thought my husband’s death, that New Year’s Eve day, […]

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