Tag: Conservation of Resources

After Shutting Down, These Golf Courses Went Wild

There was scraggly grass in one sand trap and wooden blocks and a toy castle in another, evidence of children at play. People were walking their dogs on the fairway, which was looking rather ragged and unkempt. This was only to be expected. Nowadays, these grounds are mowed just twice a year, and haven’t been […]

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Patagonia Spends $71 Million on Wildlife Conservation and Politics

A little more than $3 million to block a proposed mine in Alaska. Another $3 million to conserve land in Chile and Argentina. And $1 million to help elect Democrats around the country, including $200,000 to a super PAC this month. Patagonia, the outdoor apparel brand, is funneling its profits to an array of groups […]

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How Wolves Became a Pawn in the Culture Wars

For generations, America waged a war against the wolf; now with the animals repopulating the Mountain West, the wolf war has taken on a new shape: pitting neighbors against neighbors as they fight over how to manage wolves. Environmentalists believe that wolves not only deserve a place in the environment but also can help repair […]

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Fire Blanketed Lahaina in Toxic Debris. Where Can They Put It?

When a firestorm consumed the Hawaii town of Lahaina last year, killing 100 people, it left behind a toxic wasteland of melted batteries, charred propane tanks, and miles of debris tainted by arsenic and lead. Crews have already removed some of the most hazardous items, shipping them out for disposal on the mainland. Now begins […]

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As Switzerland’s Glaciers Shrink, a Way of Life May Melt Away

For centuries, Swiss farmers have sent their cattle, goats and sheep up the mountains to graze in warmer months before bringing them back down at the start of autumn. Devised in the Middle Ages to save precious grass in the valleys for winter stock, the tradition of “summering” has so transformed the countryside into a […]

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The Fishermen Who Could End Federal Regulation as We Know It

The Daily is made by Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Dan Powell, Sydney Harper, Mike Benoist, Liz O. Baylen, Asthaa Chaturvedi, Rachelle Bonja, Diana Nguyen, Marion […]

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A Potentially Huge Supreme Court Case Has a Hidden Conservative Backer

The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on Wednesday that, on paper, are about a group of commercial fishermen who oppose a government fee that they consider unreasonable. But the lawyers who have helped to propel their case to the nation’s highest court have a far more powerful backer: the petrochemicals billionaire Charles Koch. […]

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In Colombia, a Park for Anacondas and Anteaters, Where Ranchers Are Now Rangers

Already, though, the rangers had made a difference. They had established the government’s presence in a formerly anything-goes region. Thanks to their outreach in San Martín, they had been invited in November to march in the annual parade celebrating the cuadrillas. Mr. Zorro thought that the invitation was a turning point for the park, a […]

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Supreme Court to Hear Case That Could Limit Power of Federal Government

On a blustery fall morning in southern New Jersey, the weather was too rough for the fishing boats at the center of a momentous Supreme Court case to set out to sea. A herring fisherman named Bill Bright talked about the case, which will be argued on Wednesday and could both lift what he said […]

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As Development Alters Greek Islands’ Nature and Culture, Locals Push Back

With a deluge of foreign visitors fueling seemingly nonstop development on once pristine Greek islands, local residents and officials are beginning to fight back, moving to curb a wave of construction that has started to cause water shortages and is altering the islands’ unique cultural identity. Tourism is crucial in Greece, accounting for a fifth […]

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Norway Moves to Allow Seabed Mining Exploration

The Norwegian Parliament voted on Tuesday to authorize the opening of parts of the Norwegian Sea to seabed mining exploration, a move that reflects rising international demand for the metals needed to build batteries for electric vehicles worldwide. The decision clears the way for prospectors to look for seabed deposits between Norway and Greenland, mostly […]

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Protecting the Ancient Beech Trees of Romania

The story of the Forest of Immortal Stories begins not so long ago, in 2019, when Elena-Mirela Cojocaru, beloved wife of Ion Cojocaru, mayor of the hamlet of Nucsoara, died after a struggle with cancer. Mr. Cojocaru himself soon fell ill with a heart ailment; as a remedy his doctor told him to walk in […]

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Can $500 Million Save This Glacier?

Moore realizes the area around Thwaites is as forbidding as any location on Earth. “So this is something when people say, you know, it’s really difficult working in Antarctica, I say: yeah, well, I have abandoned ship because it’s been stuck in the ice,” he says, referring to his first trip there. “I do know […]

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Colorado River States Are Racing to Agree on Cuts Before Inauguration Day

The states that rely on the Colorado River, which is shrinking because of climate change and overuse, are rushing to agree on a long-term deal to share the dwindling resource by the end of the year. They worry that a change in administrations after the election could set back talks. Negotiators are seeking an agreement […]

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Canada’s Boreal Forests Badly Damaged by Logging

Canada has long promoted itself globally as a model for protecting one of the country’s most vital natural resources: the world’s largest swath of boreal forest, which is crucial to fighting climate change. But a new study using nearly half a century of data from the provinces of Ontario and Quebec — two of the […]

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Indiana’s Plan to Pipe In Groundwater for Microchip-Making Draws Fire

When Indiana officials created a new industrial park to lure huge microchip firms to the state, they picked a nearly 10,000-acre site close to a booming metropolis, a major airport and a university research center. But the area is missing one key ingredient to support the kinds of development the state wants to attract: access […]

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JBS, the World’s Biggest Meatpacker, Faces Millions in Environmental Damages

The Brazilian authorities are seeking millions of dollars in damages and fines from the world’s biggest meatpacker, JBS, and three smaller slaughterhouses, according to court filings that accuse them of buying cattle raised on illegally deforested lands in the Amazon rainforest. The lawsuits come as JBS is pursuing a listing on the New York Stock […]

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Demand for Cashmere Has Environmental Consequences

A decade or more ago, it wasn’t uncommon to pay several hundred dollars for a cashmere sweater. Now, as the holiday season approaches, advertisements offer cashmere sweaters at less than half that price. An ad campaign on Instagram from the retailer Quince boasts, “This $50 cashmere sweater is worth the hype!” A cozy cashmere sweater […]

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In Real vs. Fake Christmas Tree Debate: Consider the Wildlife

A few years after the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests started a Christmas tree farm, Nigel Manley, who oversaw the operations, began noticing some interesting developments among the rows of fragrant balsam and Fraser firs lining the land. In the spring, areas around the younger trees drew ground nesters like bobolinks — […]

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How Much Can Forests Fight Climate Change? A Sensor in Space Has Answers.

Over the last century, governments around the world have drawn boundaries to shield thousands of the world’s most valuable ecosystems from destruction, from the forests of Borneo and the Amazon to the savannas of Africa. These protected areas have offered lifelines to species threatened with extinction, supported the ways of life for many traditional communities […]

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A ‘Green Glacier’ Is Dismantling the Great Plains

And yet, for decades now, discussion about the Green Glacier has been largely relegated to the dusty confines of trade journals and agricultural conventions. Perhaps this is because the vast majority of our remaining grasslands are privately owned. Perhaps, as our forests burn and our levees break, there is little sympathy left for the livestock […]

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Sand Mining Threatens Long Island’s Drinking Water. Or Does It?

The Sand Land mine near Southhampton, N.Y., resembles the cratered surface of the moon, a treeless, torn-up work site that underscores the demand for a vital, if often overlooked, natural resource. Sand is crucial for building — it’s used to make concrete, asphalt and glass. And for over a century, sand from Long Island has […]

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How to Stop the Biggest Threat to Europe’s Green Transition

For years, the European Union has been laying the foundation for what may be the world’s most ambitious climate policy: the European Green Deal, which puts Europe out in front in the global fight against climate change. This formidable bundle of policies steers countries to build renewable energy resources, find ways to improve energy efficiency […]

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What It Takes to Save the Axolotl

Xochimilco is a large, semirural district in the south of Mexico City, home to a vast network of canals surrounding farming plots called chinampas. Starting around A.D. 900, this maze of earth and water produced food for the Xochimilcas, a Náhuatl speaking people who were among the first to populate the region and engineer its […]

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The Plan to Save California’s Catalina Island? Shoot the Deer.

For decades, nonnative animals have ravaged the rare habitat on Catalina. The proposed solution has infuriated local residents and animal lovers. WHY WE’RE HERE We’re exploring how America defines itself one place at a time. On a California island, residents and preservationists are feuding over how to protect the habitat for future generations. By Soumya […]

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Rare Giant Rat Is Photographed Alive for First Time

For years, the Indigenous people on Vangunu, one of the Solomon Islands, had insisted a critically endangered giant rat that could chew through coconuts still lived among the trees of the forest, though its numbers had dwindled as loggers destroyed its habitat. None had been documented alive before. But it turned out the people of […]

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An Endorsement for Nikki Haley, and More

The New York Times Audio app is home to journalism and storytelling, and provides news, depth and serendipity. If you haven’t already, download it here — available to Times news subscribers on iOS — and sign up for our weekly newsletter. The Headlines brings you the biggest stories of the day from the Times journalists […]

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Americans Love Avocados. It’s Killing Mexico’s Forests.

First the trucks arrived, carrying armed men toward the mist-shrouded mountaintop. Then the flames appeared, sweeping across a forest of towering pines and oaks. After the fire laid waste to the forest last year, the trucks returned. This time, they carried the avocado plants taking root in the orchards scattered across the once tree-covered summit […]

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What Life in Gaza Is Like Right Now

In response to the devastating Oct. 7 attack on Israel by Hamas, the group that controls the Gaza Strip, Israel imposed what it called a complete siege — cutting off almost all water, food, electricity and fuel for the more than two million Palestinians living in Gaza. It also launched thousands of airstrikes on the […]

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Turkeys Were a Marvel of Conservation. Now Their Numbers Are Dwindling.

When researchers started trapping and putting radio trackers on female turkeys in the thick woods of southeast Oklahoma, they hoped to learn how hens were successfully raising their young. Two years into that study, there is a complication: None of those 60 or so turkeys are known to have hatched offspring that lived more than […]

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Mucus-Covered Jellyfish Hint at Dangers of Deep-Sea Mining

A treasure trove of metal is hiding at the bottom of the ocean. Potato-size nodules of iron and manganese litter the seafloor, and metal-rich crusts cover underwater mountains and chimneys along hydrothermal vents. Deep-sea mining companies have set their sights on these minerals, aiming to use them in batteries and electronics. Environmentalists warn that the […]

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