Tag: Conservation of Resources

Botswana Ends Ban on Elephant Hunting

CAPE TOWN — Elephant hunting will resume in Botswana after a five-year prohibition, the government of that southern African nation said, despite intense lobbying by some conservation advocates to continue the ban. The Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism announced the decision on Wednesday, saying that after “extensive consultations with all stakeholders,” the […]

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New York Rejects Keystone-Like Pipeline in Fierce Battle Over the State’s Energy Future

In a major victory for environmental activists, New York regulators on Wednesday rejected the construction of a heavily disputed, nearly $1 billion natural gas pipeline, even as business leaders and energy companies warned that the decision could devastate the state’s economy and bring a gas moratorium to New York City and Long Island. The pipeline […]

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Surviving Despair in the Great Extinction

NASHVILLE — The gift of springtime is the panoply of new life: gray buds breaking open into bright flowers, gray branches sprouting leaves in a thousand shades of green to make a bower of our common lives. In the treetops, birds throw back their heads to sing their full-throated, body-shuddering songs. An ordinary suburban yard […]

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Can Humans Help Trees

Outrun Climate Change? By Moises Velasquez-Manoff Illustrations by Andrew Khosravani April 25, 2019 SCITUATE, R. I. — Foresters began noticing the patches of dying pines and denuded oaks, and grew concerned. Warmer winters and drier summers had sent invasive insects and diseases marching northward, killing the trees. If the dieback continued, some woodlands could become […]

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These Otters Are Popular Pets in Asia. That May Be Their Undoing.

TOKYO — We smelled them before we saw them. Amid an overwhelming reek of urine and scat, we descended a tight staircase into a cramped basement, where tattered ottomans faced a small wire cage. Within the cage stood the star attractions and source of the odor: four Asian small-clawed otters. Spotting us, the animals burst […]

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Elizabeth Warren Proposes Broad Plan to Protect Public Lands

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts unveiled a public lands proposal on Monday, thrusting land-use issues and the environment into the spotlight as she continues to set the pace on policy in a crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates. Ms. Warren’s plan, which she outlined in a post on Medium ahead of trips to Colorado and […]

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The Comeback of Trumpeter Swans

Bev Kingdon rattles off the names of trumpeter swans and their personalities as if describing her children. Pig Pen was named for her eating habits; 672 cleverly avoided tagging; 206 nearly died of lead poisoning but nursed himself back to health and then fought off his wife’s new mate to reclaim their relationship. In the […]

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Trilobites: Romeo, Meet Juliet. Now Go Save Your Species.

At first the story of Romeo, the last Sehuencas water frog, seemed like an ecological tragedy. Here was an animal in an aquarium destined to live as a bachelor, passing with his kind into extinction. But then there was Juliet. After biologists found her leaping from a waterfall at the end of a Bolivian stream, […]

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Vietnam’s Empty Forests

Despite long and tragic wars with the Japanese, the French, the Chinese and the United States during the last century, Vietnam is a treasure house. It is one of the world’s hot spots of biological diversity, according to the science research. There are 30 national parks in a country a bit larger than New Mexico, […]

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This Tarantula Became a Scientific Celebrity. Was It Poached From the Wild?

In February, the Journal of the British Tarantula Society published a paper describing a new species of tarantula, which was discovered in a national park in Sarawak, Malaysia. While the male of the species was an unremarkable brown, the female had eye-catching, electric blue legs. New spiders are discovered all the time, and the paper […]

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Amid 19-Year Drought, States Sign Deal to Conserve Colorado River Water

The water is saved, for now. Seven Western states have agreed on a plan to manage the Colorado River amid a 19-year drought, voluntarily cutting their water use to prevent the federal government from imposing a mandatory squeeze on the supply. State water officials signed the deal on Tuesday after years of negotiations, forestalling what […]

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Britain (Yes, Rainy Britain) Could Run Short of Water by 2050, Official Says

LONDON — To the casual observer, Britain — an island nation that’s no stranger to rain — could not get much wetter. But, as it turns out, that’s a fallacy. And if preventive steps are not taken, in less than three decades, Britain might run out of water, the chief executive of the Environment Agency, […]

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Senegal Dispatch: In Forlorn Park, Lion Cubs Play in Traffic and Elephant Dung Is Met With Delight

NIOKOLO RANGER OUTPOST, Senegal — The nighttime horizon glowed red from fires started by poachers. In the distance loomed a hillside that illegal gold miners were blasting with explosives. And in the middle of a busy highway, a park ranger straddled a speckled female bushbuck antelope and slit its throat. Threats to wildlife lurk in […]

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Trump Administration Loosens Sage Grouse Protections, Benefiting Oil Companies

Want climate news in your inbox? Sign up here for Climate Fwd:, our email newsletter. WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Friday finalized its plan to loosen Obama-era protections on the habitat of the sage grouse, an imperiled ground-nesting bird that roams across 10 oil-rich Western states. The plan, which would strip away protections for […]

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This Songbird Is Nearly Extinct in the Wild. An International Treaty Could Help Save It — but Won’t.

Fewer than 500 black-winged mynas remain in the wild in Indonesia, but each year more of the songbirds are captured and sold as pets. Banteng — “the most beautiful and graceful of all wild cattle,” according to the World Wide Fund for Nature — were listed as endangered in 1996, but their horns still are […]

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Forget Trump’s Border Wall. Let’s Build F.D.R.’s International Park.

Nearly 75 years ago, an American president was eyeing a grand project along our southern border, not to divide the United States and Mexico but to bring the two nations together. On June 12, 1944, a week after D-Day, President Franklin Roosevelt signed legislation establishing Big Bend National Park, almost a million acres along the […]

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Philippines Dispatch: Brazen Crocodile Preys on a Philippine Town: ‘It Was Like He Was Showing Off’

BALABAC, Philippines — On the November day when Cornelio Bonite disappeared, a crocodile was spotted in the water with a human arm clasped in its jaws. “It was like he was showing off,” said Efren Portades, 67, a watchman in the town of Balabac, a marshy island community in the Philippines near the sea border […]

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Humpback Whale Washes Ashore in Amazon River, Baffling Scientists in Brazil

Marine biologists in Brazil were stunned to discover a young humpback whale on Friday that had washed ashore on a remote, forested island in the Amazon River, at a time of the year when it should have already migrated thousands of miles to Antarctica. Members of the conservation group Bicho D’Água found the whale after […]

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