Tag: Conservation of Resources

Amid 19-Year Drought, States Sign Deal to Conserve Colorado River Water

The water is saved, for now. Seven Western states have agreed on a plan to manage the Colorado River amid a 19-year drought, voluntarily cutting their water use to prevent the federal government from imposing a mandatory squeeze on the supply. State water officials signed the deal on Tuesday after years of negotiations, forestalling what […]

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Britain (Yes, Rainy Britain) Could Run Short of Water by 2050, Official Says

LONDON — To the casual observer, Britain — an island nation that’s no stranger to rain — could not get much wetter. But, as it turns out, that’s a fallacy. And if preventive steps are not taken, in less than three decades, Britain might run out of water, the chief executive of the Environment Agency, […]

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Senegal Dispatch: In Forlorn Park, Lion Cubs Play in Traffic and Elephant Dung Is Met With Delight

NIOKOLO RANGER OUTPOST, Senegal — The nighttime horizon glowed red from fires started by poachers. In the distance loomed a hillside that illegal gold miners were blasting with explosives. And in the middle of a busy highway, a park ranger straddled a speckled female bushbuck antelope and slit its throat. Threats to wildlife lurk in […]

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Trump Administration Loosens Sage Grouse Protections, Benefiting Oil Companies

Want climate news in your inbox? Sign up here for Climate Fwd:, our email newsletter. WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Friday finalized its plan to loosen Obama-era protections on the habitat of the sage grouse, an imperiled ground-nesting bird that roams across 10 oil-rich Western states. The plan, which would strip away protections for […]

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This Songbird Is Nearly Extinct in the Wild. An International Treaty Could Help Save It — but Won’t.

Fewer than 500 black-winged mynas remain in the wild in Indonesia, but each year more of the songbirds are captured and sold as pets. Banteng — “the most beautiful and graceful of all wild cattle,” according to the World Wide Fund for Nature — were listed as endangered in 1996, but their horns still are […]

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Forget Trump’s Border Wall. Let’s Build F.D.R.’s International Park.

Nearly 75 years ago, an American president was eyeing a grand project along our southern border, not to divide the United States and Mexico but to bring the two nations together. On June 12, 1944, a week after D-Day, President Franklin Roosevelt signed legislation establishing Big Bend National Park, almost a million acres along the […]

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Philippines Dispatch: Brazen Crocodile Preys on a Philippine Town: ‘It Was Like He Was Showing Off’

BALABAC, Philippines — On the November day when Cornelio Bonite disappeared, a crocodile was spotted in the water with a human arm clasped in its jaws. “It was like he was showing off,” said Efren Portades, 67, a watchman in the town of Balabac, a marshy island community in the Philippines near the sea border […]

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Humpback Whale Washes Ashore in Amazon River, Baffling Scientists in Brazil

Marine biologists in Brazil were stunned to discover a young humpback whale on Friday that had washed ashore on a remote, forested island in the Amazon River, at a time of the year when it should have already migrated thousands of miles to Antarctica. Members of the conservation group Bicho D’Água found the whale after […]

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Could a Tiger Tragedy Have Been Avoided?

LONDON — Staff members at London Zoo were “heartbroken” after a high-risk matchmaking operation involving two rare Sumatran tigers went horribly wrong on Friday. The male’s deadly mauling of the female tiger soon after they met drew an outpouring of reactions on social media. But one question was paramount: Could the tragedy have been avoided? […]

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Trilobites: Aboriginal Hunters’ Fires Help Restore an Australian Desert

In Australia in recent decades, the bilby, the bettong, or rat kangaroo, the brush-tailed possum and other medium-sized mammals all disappeared from the Western Desert. It was a mystery: Typically bigger animals vanish first — often only after people show up. But ask the people who lived in this desert for 48,000 years what happened […]

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Joshua Trees Destroyed in National Park During Shutdown May Take Centuries to Regrow

The partial government shutdown ended last week after 35 days, but conservationists have warned that its impact may be felt for hundreds of years in at least one part of the country: Joshua Tree National Park. The Southern California park, which is larger than Rhode Island and famed for its dramatic rock formations and the […]

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Trilobites: Where Sloths Find These Branches, Their Family Trees Expand

Look closely up in the trees of a shade-grown cacao plantation in eastern Costa Rica, and you’ll see an array of small furry faces peering back at you. Those are three-toed sloths that make their homes there, clambering ever so slowly into the upper branches to bask in the morning sun. You might also spot […]

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Trilobites: Romeo the Frog Finds His Juliet. Their Courtship May Save a Species.

Romeo was made for love, as all animals are. But for years he couldn’t find it. It’s not like there was anything wrong with Romeo. Sure he’s shy, eats worms, lacks eyelashes and is 10 years old, at least. But he’s aged well, and he’s kind of a special guy. Romeo is a Sehuencas water […]

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Rise of the Golden Jackal

On a hill above Trieste, Italy, at the western edge of Slovenia, I heard the golden jackals howl. This was my second night out with Miha Krofel, a conservation biologist at the University of Ljubljana, driving rural roads through farmland and forests. The night before, along with two volunteer researchers — one a photographer who […]

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A Rising Threat to Wildlife: Electrocution

South Africa is a country of ranches, farms, reserves and national parks, many surrounded by miles of electric fencing. The fencing keeps out unwanted animal and human intruders, and protects livestock and desirable wildlife. But the fencing also has a deadly, unintended side effect: It frequently kills smaller animals, particularly birds and reptiles that scientists […]

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Watch ‘Bambi’ Monthly in Jail, Judge Orders Missouri Man in Deer Poaching Case

In the 1942 Disney movie “Bambi,” the little fawn is wobbling on stick-thin legs as it runs through the forest, urged on ahead of its mother after she hears a gunshot. Eventually, Bambi stops and turns around. “We made it!” Bambi says. But the fawn is alone in the desolate landscape. Its mother has been […]

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California Requires New City Buses to Be Electric by 2029

Want climate news in your inbox? Sign up here for Climate Fwd:, our email newsletter. California on Friday became the first state to mandate a full shift to electric buses on public transit routes, flexing its muscle as the nation’s leading environmental regulator and bringing battery-powered, heavy-duty vehicles a step closer to the mainstream. Starting […]

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Want a Frog Species Named After You? Just Be the Highest Bidder

There is a wasp named after William Shakespeare, a horse fly named after Beyoncé and a lichen named after Dolly Parton. A spider bears Bernie Sanders’s surname; Michael Jackson has a crustacean to call his own; and Donald J. Trump’s name graces a moth found in Southern California. (The researchers likened the yellow scales on […]

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