Tag: Conservation of Resources

Taking the Pulse of a Sandstone Tower in Utah

In 2013, a mutual friend brought Kat Vollinger and Nathan Richman together as rock climbing partners. Within a few years, they were married, and their shared love of climbing led them on adventures around the world. That’s how, in March 2018, they found themselves scaling Castleton Tower, a nearly 400-foot sandstone spire near Moab, Utah, […]

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Trophy Hunter Seeks to Import Parts of Rare Rhino He Paid $400,000 to Kill

A Michigan trophy hunter who paid $400,000 to kill a rare black rhinoceros in Africa in 2018 is seeking a federal permit to allow him to import its skin, skull and horns to the United States, according to government records. The hunter, Chris D. Peyerk of Shelby Township, Mich., applied in April for the permit, […]

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This Carnivorous Plant Invaded New York. That May Be Its Only Hope.

BIG POND, N.Y. — Across their kayaks, the three men passed the green shoot back and forth. Occasionally, one of them would cradle it in one palm and bring a hand lens to it with the other, inspecting the carnivorous plant that was their bounty. By day’s end, the group — Seth Cunningham and Michael […]

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German Police Look Into Killing of Rare Bird and Vigilantes’ Payback

BERLIN — It was a most surprising case for the police: An endangered bird may have attacked two men in a forest, they attacked and killed the bird, and a crowd attacked the two men. Less surprising, alcohol was involved. Now, with the body of a western capercaillie as evidence, the authorities in southwestern Germany […]

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Trump Administration Weakens Protections for Endangered Species

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Monday announced that it would change the way the Endangered Species Act is applied, significantly weakening the nation’s bedrock conservation law credited with rescuing the bald eagle, the grizzly bear and the American alligator from extinction. The changes could clear the way for new mining, oil and gas drilling, […]

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Lion Bones Are Profitable for Breeders, and Poachers

An international treaty prohibits the buying and selling of products made from any of the big cat species, save one: the African lion. If the animals have been bred in captivity in South Africa, then their skeletons, including claws and teeth, may be traded around the world. Lion parts legally exported from South Africa usually […]

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India’s Terrifying Water Crisis

India’s water crisis offers a striking reminder of how climate change is rapidly morphing into a climate emergency. Piped water has run dry in Chennai, the southern state of Tamil Nadu’s capital, and 21 other Indian cities are also facing the specter of “Day Zero,” when municipal water sources are unable to meet demand. Chennai, […]

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Mississippi Closes Beaches Because of Toxic Algae Blooms

The relentless heavy rains in the Midwest continue to cause damage, this time in the form of vast, harmful algae blooms off the gulf coast that have forced Mississippi to close all of its beaches. The increased flow of freshwater into the Gulf of Mexico has fed the thick blue-green algae, which can cause rashes, […]

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Poachers Are Invading Botswana, Last Refuge of African Elephants

In September, conservationists in Botswana discovered 87 dead elephants, their faces hacked off and tusks missing. Poaching, the researchers warned, was on the rise. The news had international repercussions. Botswana had been one of the last great elephant refuges, largely spared the poaching crisis that has swept through much of Africa over the past decade. […]

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Who Liked Hurricane Sandy? These Tiny, Endangered Birds

The wrath of Hurricane Sandy’s powerful winds and violent storm surge left considerable damage across New York and New Jersey in October 2012. But for one tiny bird, the cataclysmic storm has been a big help. “Hurricane Sandy was really good for piping plovers,” said Katie Walker, a graduate student in wildlife conservation at Virginia […]

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Fish Cannons, Koi Herpes and Other Tools to Combat Invasive Carp

Why is someone loading a fish into a tube? That’s Whooshh. It’s a high-tech fish removal system, something like a cross between a potato gun and a pneumatic tube at a drive-in bank. And that fish is a common carp, one the oldest and most invasive fish on the planet. [Like the Science Times page […]

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Elephants May Sniff Out Quantities With Their Noses

Elephants keep surprising us. They live complex social lives, cooperate, show altruism and grieve their dead. And now in the latest evidence of their sophisticated cognitive abilities, elephants appear to be able to distinguish relative amounts of food merely by smell, researchers say. The finding, reported Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, […]

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The Shorebirds of Delaware Bay Are Going Hungry

REEDS BEACH, N.J. — On a recent spring day at this remote beach, hundreds of shorebirds flapped frantically beneath a net trapping them on the sand. Dozens of volunteers rushed to disentangle the birds and place them gently in covered crates. On a nearby sand dune, teams of scientists and volunteers attached metal leg bands, […]

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White Panda Is Spotted in China for the First Time

HONG KONG — An all-white, albino panda has appeared in a natural reserve in China, the first of its kind to be documented, an expert said this week. The panda was photographed in April with an infrared camera at the Wolong National Nature Reserve in the southwestern province of Sichuan, the local authorities said in […]

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