Tag: your-feed-health

Can an Algorithm Predict the Pandemic’s Next Moves?

Judging when to tighten, or loosen, the local economy has become the world’s most consequential guessing game, and each policymaker has his or her own instincts and benchmarks. The point when hospitals reach 70 percent capacity is a red flag, for instance; so are upticks in coronavirus case counts and deaths. But as the governors […]

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Sanofi Accelerates Its Timeline for Coronavirus Vaccine Development

After lagging behind its competitors in starting clinical trials, the French drugmaker Sanofi has announced plans to speed a vaccine development timeline that could yield approval from regulatory authorities sometime next year, perhaps in the first half of 2021, the company announced on Tuesday. The company and its partner in the endeavor, GlaxoSmithKline, originally projected […]

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Gilead to Test a Version of Remdesivir That Can Be Inhaled

The American biopharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences will soon start trials of an inhalable version of remdesivir, an antiviral drug that has shown promise as a therapeutic against the coronavirus in early trials, according to a statement released Monday. Remdesivir is currently given intravenously, which restricts its use to hospital settings. “That’s been the limitation” with […]

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Tsunami or Ripple? The Pandemic’s Mental Toll Is an Open Question

The psychological fallout from the coronavirus pandemic has yet to fully show itself, but some experts have forecast a tsunami of new disorders, and news accounts have amplified that message. The World Health Organization warned in May of “a massive increase in mental health conditions in the coming months,” wrought by anxiety and isolation. Digital […]

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Copper Won’t Save You From Coronavirus

It began in mid-March. Every time Michael D. L. Johnson checked his email, the University of Arizona microbiologist would find a new batch of messages, all asking the same question: Will products made with copper keep the coronavirus at bay? “I was getting three to four emails about it a day,” Dr. Johnson said. Some […]

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Older Adults May Be Left Out of Some Covid-19 Trials

Picture the day — in six months, a year and a half or in 2023 — when university researchers or a pharmaceutical company announces a breakthrough against the virus that causes Covid-19. Maybe it’s a successful vaccine or an effective treatment, a discovery that brings hope and relief — especially to the older adults most […]

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Wildlife Trade Spreads Coronaviruses as Animals Get to Market

A study of the wildlife trade in three provinces in southern Vietnam produced startlingly clear confirmation for one of the underlying objections to the wildlife trade in Asia — the trading offers an ideal opportunity for viruses in one animal to infect another. In field rats, a highly popular animal to eat in Vietnam and […]

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As Some Sleepaway Summer Camps Close Down, Others Balance the Risks

In 1993, after wrapping up her 10th sleepaway summer at Camp Louise, in Maryland, Dr. Megan Wollman-Rosenwald realized that she didn’t want the experience to end. So she found a way to game the system: She went to medical school, then returned in 2016 to her childhood mainstay as an on-site doctor for one week […]

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Flushing the Toilet May Fling Coronavirus Aerosols All Over

Here’s one more behavior to be hyper-aware of in order to prevent coronavirus transmission: what you do after you use the toilet. Scientists have found that in addition to clearing out whatever business you’ve left behind, flushing a toilet can generate a cloud of aerosol droplets that rises nearly three feet. Those droplets may linger […]

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Coronavirus Study: 1 in 5 People Worldwide at Risk

In just six months, nearly 8 million people worldwide have been stricken with confirmed cases of Covid-19, and at least 434,000 have died. But those deaths have not been distributed evenly; among the most vulnerable are people with underlying health conditions, such as diabetes and diseases that affect the heart and lungs. According to a […]

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Health Care Advocates Push Back Against Trump’s Erasure of Transgender Rights

Health advocates representing American hospitals, medical groups, insurers and civil rights associations condemned the Trump administration on Saturday for rolling back protections for transgender patients, and for doing so amid a global pandemic. The new rule, long sought by conservatives and the religious right, narrows the legal definition of sex discrimination in the Affordable Care […]

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What We’re Learning About Online Learning

Over four days in mid-March, Cindy Hansen, an 11th grade English teacher at Timpanogos High School in Orem, Utah, had to go fully virtual, and took her class of some 30 students reading “The Great Gatsby” online. Ms. Hansen had no experience with virtual courses and, like teachers around the country, had to experiment. She […]

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Mutation Allows Coronavirus to Infect More Cells, Study Finds. Scientists Urge Caution.

For months, scientists have debated why one genetic variation of the coronavirus became dominant in many parts of the world. Many scientists argue that the variation spread widely by chance, multiplying outward from explosive outbreaks in Europe. Others have proposed the possibility that a mutation gave it some kind of biological edge and have been […]

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Where Protesters Go, Street Medics Follow

When Safa Abdulkadir, a first-year medical student at the University of Minnesota, attended a protest in Minneapolis in response to the killing of George Floyd, she had no intention of putting her medical knowledge to use. It was May 26, one day after Mr. Floyd was killed, and although Ms. Abdulkadir was attending the demonstration […]

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Navigating Home Care During the Pandemic

In March, Amy Carrier asked one of the two women who provided home care for her mother to stop coming to work. Her mother, 74, has Alzheimer’s disease and lives with her in Corvallis, Ore. To protect her from the coronavirus, “it was clear that I needed to lock down my house,” said Ms. Carrier, […]

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Disordered Eating in a Disordered Time

For Emily Roll, a performance artist in southeast Michigan, the beginning of 2020 offered a glimpse of hope for an anorexia recovery that was a long time coming. After 15 years of struggling with an eating disorder, Mx. Roll began seeing a nutritionist and therapist. They were spending each day busy on their feet: doing […]

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First-Time Gun Owners at Risk for Suicide, Major Study Confirms

The decision to buy a handgun for the first time is typically motivated by self-protection. But it also raises the purchasers’ risk of deliberately shooting themselves by ninefold on average, with the danger most acute in the weeks after purchase, scientists reported on Wednesday. The risk remains elevated for years, they said. The findings are […]

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Monster or Machine? A Profile of the Coronavirus at 6 Months

Listen to This Audio Audio Recording by Audm To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. A virus, at heart, is information, a packet of data that benefits from being shared. The information at stake is genetic: instructions to make more virus. Unlike a truly […]

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After 6 Months, Important Mysteries About Coronavirus Endure

In the time since the world’s scientists and public health officials first became widely aware of the new coronavirus in January, they’ve had six months to learn about it. They’ve reached many conclusions about the virus and the illness it causes, from the importance of wearing masks to contain it, to the unusual range of […]

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Six Months of Coronavirus: Here’s Some of What We’ve Learned

We don’t really know when the novel coronavirus first began infecting people. But as we turn a page on our calendars into June, it is fair to say that Sars-Cov-2 has been with us now for a full six months. At first, it had no name or true identity. Early in January, news reports referred […]

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A Virus-Hunter Falls Prey to a Virus He Underestimated

“This is the revenge of the viruses,” said Dr. Peter Piot, the director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. “I’ve made their lives difficult. Now they’re trying to get me.” Dr. Piot, 71 years old, is a legend in the battles against Ebola and AIDS. But Covid-19 almost killed him. “A week […]

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Trump Administration Coronavirus Testing Strategy Draws Concerns: ‘This Isn’t the Hunger Games’

The Trump administration’s new testing strategy, released Sunday to Congress, holds individual states responsible for planning and carrying out all coronavirus testing, while planning to provide some supplies needed for the tests. The proposal also says existing testing capacity, if properly targeted, is sufficient to contain the outbreak. But epidemiologists say that amount of testing […]

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Fear of Covid Leads Other Patients to Decline Critical Treatment

It was the call Lance Hansen, gravely ill with liver disease, had been waiting weeks for, and it came just before midnight in late April. A liver was available for him. He got up to get dressed for the three-hour drive to San Francisco for the transplant surgery. And then he panicked. “Within five minutes […]

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How to Improve and Protect Nursing Homes From Outbreaks

The doctors, researchers and advocates who have been paying close attention for years are appalled at the way the coronavirus has devastated the nation’s nursing homes — but they’re not shocked. “Every geriatrician knew what was coming,” said Dr. Mike Wasserman, a geriatrician and president of the California Association of Long Term Care Medicine. Robyn […]

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After Coronavirus, Office Workers Might Face Unexpected Health Threats

When you finally return to work after the lockdown, coronavirus might not be the only illness you need to worry about contracting at the office. Office buildings once filled with employees emptied out in many cities and states as shelter-in-place orders were issued. These structures, normally in constant use, have been closed off and shut […]

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After Coronavirus, Office Workers Might Face Unexpected Health Threats

When you finally return to work after the lockdown, coronavirus might not be the only illness you need to worry about contracting at the office. Office buildings once filled with employees emptied out in many cities and states as shelter-in-place orders were issued. These structures, normally in constant use, have been closed off and shut […]

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Is the Pandemic Sparking Suicide?

The mental health toll of the coronavirus pandemic is only beginning to show itself, and it is too early to predict the scale of the impact. The coronavirus pandemic is an altogether different kind of cataclysm — an ongoing, wavelike, poorly understood threat that seems to be both everywhere and nowhere, a contagion nearly as […]

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Remote and Ready to Fight Coronavirus’s Next Wave

In mid-March, Dr. Jim Bristow’s wife came down with gastrointestinal issues. Then, she couldn’t stop coughing. Her symptoms pointed to coronavirus, but she couldn’t get tested — in part because of the nationwide test shortage, but also because the pair lived in Vashon, an idyllic town on an island in Washington State’s Puget Sound with […]

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How Pandemics End

When will the Covid-19 pandemic end? And how? According to historians, pandemics typically have two types of endings: the medical, which occurs when the incidence and death rates plummet, and the social, when the epidemic of fear about the disease wanes. “When people ask, ‘When will this end?,’ they are asking about the social ending,” […]

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F.D.A. Approves First Antigen Test for Detecting the Coronavirus

Unlike commonly available coronavirus tests that use polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, antigen diagnostics work by quickly detecting fragments of virus in a sample. The newly approved Quidel test will rely on specimens collected from nasal swabs, according to the F.D.A., and they can only be processed by the company’s lab instruments. “Diagnostic testing is […]

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Mysterious Coronavirus Illness Claims 3 Children in New York

A mysterious syndrome has killed three young children in New York and sickened 73 others, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said on Saturday, an alarming rise in a phenomenon that was first publicly identified earlier this week. The syndrome, a toxic-shock inflammation that affects the skin, the eyes, blood vessels and the heart, can leave children […]

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