Tag: Hiring and Promotion

Amazon’s Effort to Recruit 30,000 Workers Collides With Saturated Job Market

SEATTLE — Engineers in the Bay Area. Advertising managers in Chicago. Freight specialists in Arizona. At Amazon, the job listings keep piling up, reflecting a company growing in many directions amid one of the tightest labor markets in memory. On Monday, Amazon said it had 30,000 open positions in the United States, including full- and […]

Read More

A Judge Refused to Hire a Party Boss’s Aide. A Demotion Followed.

Three months after the Bronx Democratic Party announced its support for Judge Armando Montano in the 2017 election for State Supreme Court justice, the party’s chairman had a request: He wanted the newly elected judge to hire the chairman’s former aide as a confidential assistant. Justice Montano interviewed the person, thought it over and declined. […]

Read More

In a Tight Labor Market, a Disability May Not Be a Barrier

ROUND ROCK, Tex. — When Kate Cosway completed her master’s degree in 2014, her résumé drew plenty of interest, but she rarely advanced far in the hiring process. She was pretty sure she knew why: She is on the autism spectrum and struggles in traditional interviews. Her luck finally turned this summer when she landed […]

Read More

Build an Online Presence Without Giving Up Privacy

This article is part of a limited-run newsletter. You can sign up here. Charlie Warzel is off this week, so he’s turning the newsletter over to his colleague Thorin Klosowski. Every hiring manager will do a Google search on your name, most companies keep an eye on your social networks, and in several industries, you’re […]

Read More

To Promote Inclusivity, Stay Away from Personality Assessments

My first experience taking the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (M.B.T.I.) was at a job where it was mandatory. The company’s chief executive announced that all employees would take the test as part of a quarterly staff retreat. The assessment concluded that I was an I.N.T.J. (Introversion, Intuition, Thinking, Judgment.) At the retreat, we were all encouraged […]

Read More

How Job Retraining Can Yield Lasting Wage Gains (It Isn’t Cheap)

SAN ANTONIO — The economic odds facing Avigail Rodriguez a few years ago couldn’t have been much worse. An undocumented immigrant and a single mother, she lived in a cramped apartment in a tough neighborhood in San Antonio and earned just $9 an hour working as a nurse’s assistant. Today, Ms. Rodriguez, 26, owns her […]

Read More

Identity Politics Roil Most Diverse House Democratic Caucus Ever

WASHINGTON — Weeks after Democrats assumed control of the House with the most diverse class ever, the leaders of their campaign arm invited more than a dozen top political consultants to lead a discussion on the message for their fragile majority. Every one of the strategists was white. Five months later, House Democrats are reckoning […]

Read More

How to Disclose a Disability to Your Employer (and Whether You Should)

The invisible nature of my chronic illness protects me from a whole universe of discrimination and microaggressions, but it also insulates me from potential support. Of course, I acknowledge that my position is a privileged one. Some disabilities announce themselves as soon as a job candidate enters an interview room, along with all of the […]

Read More

My Aunt Has Alzheimer’s and Her Husband Doesn’t Seem to Care

My family is elderly, and my aunt — who is in her late 70s — was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. If someone does not go with her to appointments, she often forgets what was discussed, including medication, follow-up appointments or even why surgery is scheduled. We know that this will get worse with time. My […]

Read More

How Data Can Help You Win in the Winner-Take-All Economy

This article is adapted from the book “How to Win in a Winner-Take-All World,” to be published June 18 by St. Martin’s Press. On the day I met Brett Ostrum, in a conference room in Redmond, Wash., he was wearing a black leather jacket and a neat goatee, and his laptop was covered with stickers […]

Read More

New Evidence of Age Bias in Hiring, and a Push to Fight It

MADISON, Ala. — Across the United States, mammoth corporations and family businesses share a complaint: a shortage of workers. As the unemployment rate has tunneled its way to a half-century low, employers insist they must scramble to lure applicants. The shadow of age bias in hiring, though, is long. Tens of thousands of workers say […]

Read More

At Work, Everyone Is in Fact Talking About You All the Time

Send questions about the office, money, careers and work-life balance to workfriend@nytimes.com. Include your name and location, even if you want them withheld. Letters may be edited. You Are Not the Snack Czar My workplace provides a variety of free snacks. These usually include bananas, and there is no problem with taking one or three […]

Read More

Want a Job but Have a Record? Who Cares? You’re Hired.

If you want a job at Greyston Bakery in Yonkers, N.Y., just north of the Bronx, it’s yours. There’s no background check, drug test, credit check or call to references. Greyston won’t even interview you. You just go into the bakery and put your name and contact information on a list. When a job comes […]

Read More