Tag: Depression (Mental)

Tsunami or Ripple? The Pandemic’s Mental Toll Is an Open Question

The psychological fallout from the coronavirus pandemic has yet to fully show itself, but some experts have forecast a tsunami of new disorders, and news accounts have amplified that message. The World Health Organization warned in May of “a massive increase in mental health conditions in the coming months,” wrought by anxiety and isolation. Digital […]

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For Older People, Despair, as Well as Covid-19, Is Costing Lives

Earlier this month, a colleague who heads the geriatrics service at a prominent San Francisco hospital told me they had begun seeing startling numbers of suicide attempts by older adults. These were not cry-for-help gestures, but true efforts to die by people using guns, knives, and repurposed household items. Such so-called “failed suicides” turn out […]

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A Possible Remedy for Pandemic Stress: Exercise

Can we help ease the stress of the coronavirus pandemic by moving more? A new study of exercise and mental health during the early stages of the nationwide lockdown suggests that the answer is yes. It finds that people who managed to remain physically active during those early weeks of sheltering at home were less […]

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How to Tell if It’s More Than Just a Bad Mood

For quite a while after it hit, life wasn’t bad. I had a job, at least, and was buoyed by family togetherness, by connecting and reconnecting virtually with friends. By the sensation of living through history. By walks in the park, observing fellow New Yorkers trying to fortify themselves, like I was. The last few […]

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How to Tell if It’s More Than Just a Bad Mood

For quite a while after it hit, life wasn’t bad. I had a job, at least, and was buoyed by family togetherness, by connecting and reconnecting virtually with friends. By the sensation of living through history. By walks in the park, observing fellow New Yorkers trying to fortify themselves, like I was. The last few […]

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In a World ‘So Upside Down,’ the Virus Is Taking a Toll on Young People’s Mental Health

The email, written by an eighth grader and with the subject line “Wellness Check,” landed in her school counselor’s inbox nearly three weeks after schools had closed in Libby, Mont., a remote town of 2,700 cradled by snow-topped mountains. “I would like you to call me,” the student wrote. “This whole pandemic has really been […]

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Is the Pandemic Sparking Suicide?

The mental health toll of the coronavirus pandemic is only beginning to show itself, and it is too early to predict the scale of the impact. The coronavirus pandemic is an altogether different kind of cataclysm — an ongoing, wavelike, poorly understood threat that seems to be both everywhere and nowhere, a contagion nearly as […]

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‘I Can’t Turn My Brain Off’: PTSD and Burnout Threaten Medical Workers

The coronavirus patient, a 75-year-old man, was dying. No family member was allowed in the room with him, only a young nurse. In full protective gear, she dimmed the lights and put on quiet music. She freshened his pillows, dabbed his lips with moistened swabs, held his hand, spoke softly to him. He wasn’t even […]

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The Funny Thing About Depression Is …

THE HILARIOUS WORLD OF DEPRESSION By John Moe Not every book is for everyone, and not every book on depression is for every depressive. But the question that might be asked of any mental health book, regarding its raison d’être, is: Can this help someone? “The Hilarious World of Depression,” by John Moe, the veteran […]

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An Arrest at St. Patrick’s, a Struggle for Help, Then a Suicide

Three weeks after Marc Lamparello was released early from Rikers Island jail because of concerns over the coronavirus, he drove his parents’ van to the George Washington Bridge and tried to climb over an 11-foot fence intended to prevent suicides. The police stopped him. A week later, Mr. Lamparello tried again. This time he jumped […]

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Kashmir, Under Siege and Lockdown, Faces a Mental Health Crisis

PAHOO, Kashmir — Sara Begum’s suffering began on Aug. 3, when masked policemen barged into her home, badly roughed up her son and whisked him away. Ms. Begum’s son, Fayaz Ahmad Mir, 28, was one of thousands of civilians arrested or detained by order of the Indian government after it moved forcefully to cement its […]

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March, April, May: City’s Mood Darkens as Crisis Feels Endless

With no clues about when the pandemic might subside, short-term discomfort is becoming long-term despair: “I feel like I have accepted this, and given up.” April 25, 2020 ImageNew York City’s sidewalks, like this one in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, have been empty for weeks.Credit…Juan Arredondo for The New York Times A walk in […]

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March, April, May: City’s Mood Darkens as Crisis Feels Endless

With no clues about when the pandemic might subside, short-term discomfort is becoming long-term despair: “I feel like I have accepted this, and given up.” April 25, 2020 ImageNew York City’s sidewalks, like this one in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, have been empty for weeks.Credit…Juan Arredondo for The New York Times A walk in […]

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Coco Gauff’s Emotional Struggles: What Her Parents Saw

Coco Gauff, the American tennis prodigy who made inspiring runs at the last three Grand Slam tournaments, made it clear last week that her precocious rise did not happen without distress. In a forthright post for “Behind the Racquet” — a series created by the American player Noah Rubin — Gauff, 16, discussed grappling with […]

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Postpartum Depression Can Be Dangerous. Here’s How to Recognize It and Seek Treatment.

This guide was originally published on June 10, 2019 in NYT Parenting. I have a history of depression, so in the weeks following the births of both of my children, my husband and mother were on high alert for any signs of postpartum depression. Not to be confused with the “baby blues” — or the […]

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How the Pandemic Can Improve America’s Health Care System

As it approves billions of dollars to support hospitals and health care workers besieged by Covid-19, Congress can reinforce some of the worst elements of America’s broken health care system or it can begin to transform the system by making permanent the reforms the pandemic has forced through. At least three major changes have been […]

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‘I Feel Like I’m Finally Cracking and I Don’t Even Know Why’

Last week I asked Times readers to describe how the coronavirus is affecting their mental health. More than 5,000 of you wrote in, and I’ve spent the last week overwhelmed by the bravery and vulnerability of your responses, some of which I quote in my latest column, “The Pandemic of Fear and Agony.” Everybody is […]

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What the Coronavirus Is Doing to Our Mental Health

For nearly 30 years — most of my adult life — I have struggled with depression and anxiety. While I’ve never felt alone in such commonplace afflictions — the family secret everyone shares — I now find I have more fellow sufferers than I could have ever imagined. Within weeks, the familiar symptoms of mental […]

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The Benefits of Exercise for Children’s Mental Health

Recent research on the link between physical activity and depression risk in adults has suggested that exercise may offset the genetic tendency toward depression. Adults with genetic risks who exercised regularly were no more likely to develop depression than those without the genetic propensity. There’s good evidence that this same association holds in adolescents, a […]

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Stalked by the Fear That Dementia Is Stalking You

Do I know I’m at risk for developing dementia? You bet. My father died of Alzheimer’s disease at age 72; my sister was felled by frontotemporal dementia at 58. And that’s not all: Two maternal uncles had Alzheimer’s, and my maternal grandfather may have had vascular dementia. (In his generation, it was called senility.) So […]

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