Tag: Archives and Records

‘I Have to Get That’: How Henry Chalfant Became a Graffiti Ambassador

When Henry Chalfant arrived in New York City from suburban Pittsburgh in 1973, as an aspiring sculptor, he found a place teetering on the verge of bankruptcy. This was “Ford to City: Drop Dead” New York. But amid the turmoil a new form of art making was taking shape — one that took up space […]

Read More

Betty Corwin, Who Preserved Theater’s Legacy, Dies at 98

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts announced an ambitious program in 1970 to preserve evanescent theatrical performances for posterity on film. Betty L. Corwin was described as assisting the man in charge, the chief of research. But the project, which would become the renowned Theater on Film and Tape Archive, was the […]

Read More

A Sound-and-Art Show Fills a Void for Muslims in Brooklyn

Nsenga Knight, a 38-year-old artist, recalls visiting the Brooklyn Historical Society archives after receiving a research grant, curious to explore what sort of material she could find about Muslims in Brooklyn. She didn’t find much of anything. “They’re missing a lot of stuff,” Ms. Knight, who was raised Muslim in the East Flatbush neighborhood, thought. […]

Read More

It Was ‘Cool Central’: Bill T. Jones Leads a Trip Through His Archive

“There are a lot of emotions in these stories,” the choreographer, dancer and director Bill T. Jones said one evening this summer as he rummaged through some of the hundreds of folders and document boxes that make up the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company Archive, which had just been acquired by the New York Public […]

Read More

What Should an Artist Save?

IT WAS THE EARLY ’80S and a low point for Judy Chicago. The artist had spent more than half of the previous decade creating “The Dinner Party,” an ambitious work of art for which she is today perhaps best known but at the time had earned her ridicule. The unapologetically feminist installation piece, a triangular […]

Read More

Ancestry Digitizes Millions of Holocaust Records

Ancestry, the genealogy and DNA testing company, has digitized millions of records of people who were displaced or persecuted in the Holocaust and made them searchable online at no cost. The announcement this week drove numerous genealogists to the site to try to fill in longstanding gaps in family stories. It also spurred a debate […]

Read More

Reagan Called Africans ‘Monkeys’ in Call With Nixon, Tape Reveals

Ronald Reagan was the governor of California in 1971 when he phoned the White House to vent his political frustration to President Richard M. Nixon and, according to a newly released audio recording, called African people “monkeys” in a slur that sparked laughter from the president of the United States. The previously undisclosed exchange took […]

Read More

How Moon-Landing Tapes Found in a $218 Batch Could Fetch $1 Million

The Apollo 11 moon walk wasn’t the first broadcast sent from space, but in geographic reach, it was the most astonishing. Microwave links, satellites and landlines carried images of Neil Armstrong’s steps around the globe from Australia and the United States to Japan and Europe, even parts of the Eastern Bloc, in virtually real time. […]

Read More

The Holocaust Survivor Who Deciphered Nazi Doublespeak

They didn’t wait for the war to end. In August 1944, as soon as Soviet troops swept the Nazis out of eastern Poland, a group of Jewish intellectuals rushed to cities like Lublin and Lodz to begin collecting and recording, scouring for any trace of the still fresh horror that had taken their own loved […]

Read More

For Claes Oldenburg, a Time to Let Go, a Time to Look Ahead

When Claes Oldenburg, widely recognized as the father of Pop art, heard that a visitor to his studio at the western edge of SoHo wanted to see drawings of the fictional land he invented as a child, he said, playfully, “At last!” Now 90, excusing himself for taking a seat because “my knees aren’t reliable,” […]

Read More

You Know Frida Kahlo’s Face. Now You Can (Probably) Hear Her Voice.

ImageThe face of the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo is well known, thanks to paintings like “Self Portrait With Monkeys” (1943). But what does her voice sound like? CreditLauren Fleishman for The New York Times Frida Kahlo is one of the 20th century’s most celebrated artists. Her paintings, particularly her many self-portraits, are instantly recognizable, and her image […]

Read More

Recordings by Elton John, Nirvana and Thousands More Lost in Fire

Eleven years ago this month, a fire ripped through a part of Universal Studios Hollywood. At the time, the company said that the blaze had destroyed the theme park’s “King Kong” attraction and a video vault that contained only copies of old works. But, according to an article published on Tuesday by The New York […]

Read More

The Day the Music Burned

1. ‘The Vault Is on Fire’ The fire that swept across the backlot of Universal Studios Hollywood on Sunday, June 1, 2008, began early that morning, in New England. At 4:43 a.m., a security guard at the movie studio and theme park saw flames rising from a rooftop on the set known as New England […]

Read More

Three Created a Fertility Revolution, but One, a Woman, Went Unrecognized

LONDON — Two male British scientists gained worldwide fame as the developers of in vitro fertilization, but both viewed a woman, Jean Purdy, as an equal partner in the breakthrough, records made public on Monday show. One of the male scientists, Dr. Robert Edwards, tried to have her work recognized, but instead it has gone […]

Read More

Learning What Vets Could Not Tell: What They Did in World War II

NEW ORLEANS — All his life, Joseph Griesser hungered to hear the story of his father’s Army service in World War II. What he had were vague outlines: that Lt. Frank Griesser had splashed onto Omaha Beach on D-Day; that his lifelong pronounced limp had come from an artillery blast. But the details? They remained […]

Read More