Tag: Restoration and Renovation

Can the Rebirth of a Negro League Stadium Revive a Distressed City?

By Kelly Whiteside PATERSON, N.J. — There used to be a ballpark here, at the corner of Maple and Liberty. Baseball royalty once rounded the bases, and city residents once packed the stands. Now defaced with graffiti, Hinchliffe Stadium looks like a blighted lot about to be razed. Weeds and trees have uprooted the bleachers, […]

Read More

The New MoMA Is Here. Get Ready for Change.

Picasso and Braque were looking a little forlorn: unsure of their new home, unsure of their new acquaintances. It was early September, six anxious weeks from the reopening of the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan. After three years of piecemeal renovations, the museum had shut its doors for the summer, preparing for a top-to-bottom […]

Read More

Your Subway Was Delayed by 1930s Signals. A Fix Is Finally Coming.

New Yorkers have grown unhappily accustomed to hearing that their trains are delayed by “signal problems.” But most riders probably have no idea what that means. The signal system is the invisible, unglamorous backbone of the subway, controlling when trains can move down the tracks. But the demands of a 21st-century ridership are being borne […]

Read More

After a Renovation, a Storied Theater Hopes to Entice Paris

PARIS — The workmen were everywhere. Backstage and onstage, they were hammering, banging, gluing, carrying, laying tarpaulin, shimmying up ladders and shouting, “Attention!” In the auditorium, a team checked the red velvet seats, making sure that each was in the correct position. On the stage, performers rehearsed, apparently oblivious to the controlled chaos all around. […]

Read More

The City Poised to Become Europe’s Next Affordable Creative Haven

Over the past five years, Albania has been discovered by travelers as that rare thing: a largely unexplored corner of Europe (one with some 265 miles of coastline). The small Balkan country sits just across the Adriatic and Ionian seas from Italy’s heel and a mere 45-minute ferry ride away from the Greek island of […]

Read More

‘Indecent’ and ‘Absurd’: Project for Gare du Nord Divides Paris

PARIS — A group of leading French architects have denounced a plan to renovate the Gare du Nord, one of Paris’s main train stations, calling the designs that would turn the station into a glassy, mammoth, restaurant-filled shopping mall “indecent,” “absurd” and “unacceptable.” The plan for the Gare du Nord, the terminus for the Eurostar […]

Read More

Who Says Building Scaffolding Has to Be Ugly?

Someone could easily make a highbrow reality show about Susanna Sirefman and her firm, Dovetail Design Strategists. An architect by training, a writer and lecturer by avocation, she consults with major institutions to help them find the right architects for their new buildings, additions and renovations. Sometimes this involves organizing design competitions that streamline and […]

Read More

Notre-Dame Construction Resumes in Paris, but Worries About Lead Remain

PARIS — Construction resumed at the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris on Monday, weeks after authorities had shut the site down over worries about lead contamination linked to the fire in April. The work restarted with stricter decontamination measures in place, but amid concerns that authorities still weren’t doing enough to contain the blaze’s toxic fallout. […]

Read More

Where the Resistance Helped Plan the Liberation of Paris

The tunnel to the subterranean bunker that played a pivotal role in the liberation of Paris is long and narrow, each step down deceptively steep. It takes 100 of those steps to reach the former military command post where, for six days, members of the French Resistance helped orchestrate the city’s release from the Nazi […]

Read More

If Only These Walls (and Bookcases) Could Talk

Transparency is one of the biggest trends in modern office design: open floor plans, fewer offices, glass walls and doors. And at a time when #MeToo has called attention to the sordid things that can happen behind closed doors, there may be some comfort in having everything, and everyone, within view. But a taste for […]

Read More

The Raffles Singapore Embarks on a Modern Journey

In Singapore, in an intimate space full of vintage books and leather furnishings, millennials congregate after work. Some on dates, others with groups of friends, they are ready to flirt and mingle. The stylish crowd is international. Some come from across the world. Others, a taxi ride away. But this isn’t a trendy new bar […]

Read More

From Former Mental Hospital to Recreational Hub

COLUMBIA, S.C. — The South Carolina Lunatic Asylum admitted its first patient in 1828. Ever since, its impressive brick wards surrounded by nearly 200 acres of leafy lawns and gardens served as landmarks in Columbia, the state’s capital. Almost 200 years later, and three decades after the last patient was discharged, the old brick buildings […]

Read More

Who Mows the Lawn at Storm King, New York’s Largest Sculpture Park?

SURFACING It takes a crew of eight to maintain the 500 acres at Storm King Art Center, where art lives in the landscape. ImageMaya Lin’s “Storm King Wavefield,” (2007-08) gets a haircut.CreditThomas Prior for The New York Times Joel Longinott and Robert Finch dig a hole for a new installation. Mark di Suvero’s “Figolu” (2005-11) […]

Read More

‘We Cannot Save Everything’: A Historic Neighborhood Confronts Rising Seas

NEWPORT, R.I. — The Point, a waterfront neighborhood here, is one of the largest, best preserved and most important Colonial-era communities in the United States. Its grid of 18th-century streets contains scores of houses built before the American Revolution, and dozens more that are almost as old. “It’s incredible to walk around a neighborhood like […]

Read More

NASA Reopens Apollo Mission Control Room That Once Landed Men on Moon

[Read all Times reporting on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. | Sign up for the weekly Science Times email.] HOUSTON — After Gene Kranz retired in the 1990s, he started to give occasional tours to VIPs at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. It was there in the Apollo Mission Control Center that […]

Read More

A Celebrity Tower Is ‘Getting Some Work Done’

Ever since the Flatiron Building was erected at the foot of Madison Square Park in Manhattan in 1902, it has brimmed with tenants, most of which were small businesses. Songwriters tickled piano keys for sheet-music publishers. Dentists buzzed their drills. At one company, milliners made fezzes for the Masons. Things began to change after 1959, […]

Read More

Rebirth of a Parisian Legend

ImageThe Parisian restaurant Lapérouse recently was renovated. It is known for its private dining rooms like this one, named the Salon Astrolabe.CreditRoberto Frankenberg for The New York Times PARIS — “This has always been a house of pleasures — of gastronomy, of the flesh, of drinking, smoking and seduction, of conversation, literature and the arts,” […]

Read More

New York’s Tribute to the ‘Tombs Angel’: Lost, Found, Now Restored

No less a critic than Charles Dickens was appalled by the way New York in the 19th century housed its prisoners in the dank, overcrowded and smelly precincts of “the Tombs,” the city jail in lower Manhattan. “Such indecent and disgusting dungeons as these cells, would bring disgrace upon the most despotic empire in the […]

Read More

How a 19th-Century Workman’s Cottage Became a Family Home

For most couples, attempting a gut renovation of a historic home in a matter of months — while expecting twins — is a surefire recipe for disaster. But for Stefanie Brechbuehler and Robert Highsmith, the husband-and-wife co-founders of the Brooklyn-based design firm Workstead, the recent revamp of an 1850s residence in upstate New York not […]

Read More