Tag: Restoration and Renovation

Can a New Arts Center Revitalize Provincetown?

PROVINCETOWN, Mass. — There was only one destination of choice for the literary set looking to leave New York City during the sweltering summer of 1916: Provincetown, at the outermost tip of Cape Cod. Once there, writers like John Reed and Louise Bryant, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, and an assorted cast of Greenwich Village radicals […]

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A Botched Restoration of a Painting in Spain Draws Outrage

Art restoration experts in Spain called on Tuesday for tighter regulation of their work and condemned reports of a botched restoration of a copy of a Baroque-era painting of the Virgin Mary. A private art collector in Valencia, Spain, paid for the painted copy of “The Immaculate Conception of El Escorial” by the Spanish artist […]

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How to Create an Outdoor Room

If you are fortunate enough to have a terrace, a porch or some backyard space, spending a lot of time at home can be a much nicer experience. But how you design that space makes all the difference. “A lot of times, you’ll see a beautiful garden with very organized furniture, which looks pretty, but […]

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Budget-Friendly Projects for Social-Distancing Weekends

With so much time spent at home, many of us are paying more attention to our surroundings — and discovering that we don’t like what we see. Now might not be the time for a gut renovation, given the social distancing measures still in place and shifting rules regarding construction in different areas and apartment […]

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How to Contain Your Children’s Clutter

Any home can feel claustrophobic during a pandemic. But those with young children may feel especially hemmed in, if their living space is covered with toys, games and school supplies. If that’s your reality, there is a way to hold back the deluge of clutter, or at least make cleanup easier at the end of […]

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Ready to Sell? Here’s How to Refresh Your Home During Lockdown

The warm weather of spring usually ushers in a flurry of real estate activity, as buyers and sellers begin plotting summer moves. But this year, with different parts of the country on varying degrees of lockdown, and the coronavirus putting the kibosh on many open houses, some sellers may be hesitating to list their homes. […]

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Five Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now

In Silicon Valley, the natural order of time is reverse chronological: what matters most is what is newest, and can be constantly refreshed by swiping downward. Why, because the present’s so great? Two decades into a profoundly unpromising century — and amid a pandemic whose social and epidemiological fallout strongly echoes plagues from centuries past […]

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How the Virus May Change Your Next Home

The coronavirus pandemic has placed any number of demands on our homes, which now serve as makeshift offices, art studios, gyms, workshops, classrooms and storage lockers. And urban apartments — where all of those functions are often squeezed into a space-constrained envelope — face the biggest challenges of all. Those of us quarantined in a […]

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How the Virus May Change Your Next Home

The coronavirus pandemic has placed any number of demands on our homes, which now serve as makeshift offices, art studios, gyms, workshops, classrooms and storage lockers. And urban apartments — where all of those functions are often squeezed into a space-constrained envelope — face the biggest challenges of all. Those of us quarantined in a […]

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In Uzbekistan, Coming to Terms With the Country’s Dazzling History

Image Central Asia was once home to several bustling trade cities. Today, traveling through them reawakens a distant, though not forgotten, past. An exterior view of the Ark of Bukhara, an ancient citadel built — according to one 11th-century legend — by the epic hero Siyavush. It operated as a fortress but also as home […]

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For Joanna Gaines, Home Is the Heart of a Food and Design Empire

The first Chip Gaines heard of avocado toast was in 2017. He and his wife, Joanna, were about to open a 200-seat restaurant in downtown Waco, Texas, where their home design and construction business is based. The family pancake recipe was locked in, and the biscuits and gravy were good to go by the time […]

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Finally There’s Time to Read (or at Least Organize Your Books)

Looking to make the most of time spent stuck at home, many of us are turning to books. And with good reason: Reading a new novel or a classic you’ve been meaning to get to for years — or even experimenting with recipes you’ve never tried in an old cookbook — is one of the […]

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A Cast-Iron SoHo Facade and Its Odyssey to New Jersey and Back

After a heavy rain in 2004, the iron-fronted 1886 loft building at 74 Grand Street suddenly began listing to starboard, terrifying the people inside and earning the five-story structure the nickname the Leaning Tower of SoHo. Over time, the tilt toward Wooster Street grew to an alarming 30 inches or so, and in 2010 the […]

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A Glimpse Inside the Secluded World of a Georgian Nunnery

With travel restrictions in place worldwide, we’ve launched a new series — The World Through a Lens — in which photojournalists transport you, virtually, to some of our planet’s most beautiful and intriguing places. This week, Robert Presutti shares a collection of photographs from a nunnery in the Samtskhe-Javakheti region of Georgia. A decade ago, […]

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Classic Skyscrapers Define New York. Take a Virtual Tour.

It’s a metaphor for Manhattan, a synonym for “Mad Men,” the apex of midcentury modernist New York. It supplanted some of the city’s stateliest mansions with corporate palaces in blue glass and bronze. The Park Avenue School of Architecture is the term the critic Ada Louise Huxtable employed to define the “sleek and shiny” postwar […]

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Their Car Beat Hitler’s Racers, but Who Owns It Now?

To put it mildly, all three were underdogs. It was the 1930s, and the French automaker Delahaye was struggling to stay afloat. Compared with the Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union teams generously financed by the Third Reich, Delahaye’s entries into racing competitions were underfunded and underpowered. Then, as it is now, auto racing was dominated by […]

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Marie Antoinette Would Be Proud

VERSAILLES, France — In 1775, when Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were living at the Palace of Versailles, its nearly 2,000 acres of gardens were open to the public, as they are today. So the queen wanted an area she could enjoy privately, with her children and friends. In the last few years, the palace […]

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Home Schooling, Simplified

Like many people’s homes at the moment, mine now resembles a juvenile corporate office. My 6-year-old logs into Zoom for morning meetings and singalongs, my 8-year-old uses Google Docs to pitch fairy-tale adaptations to his teacher, and both use new email accounts to compare schedules with classmates and dole out emojis. When New York closed […]

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The Extravagance of Less

“IT’S NOT SO easy to live in my houses,” says the Italian artist and architect Vincenzo De Cotiis. Known as both an interior designer for his austere renovations (often of centuries-old palazzi) and as a furniture and object designer, the 61-year-old De Cotiis has a youthful rebelliousness in person that seems to contradict the seriousness […]

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At the Brooklyn Navy Yard It’s Full Steam Ahead

This article is part of our latest special report on Design, which is about getting personal with customization. The Brooklyn Navy Yard once echoed with the sounds of hammering and welding as workers built battleships and aircraft carriers on the 300-acre campus bordering the East River. Today, the Navy and its single-minded mission are long […]

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She Wanted to Revive a Park. First She Had to Take On the Rats.

Aleya Lehmann watched Verdi Square decay over 16 years of walks down Broadway, from her home on 93rd Street to the Lincoln Center Cinema at 68th Street, a favorite place for a movie and a box of Cookie Dough Bites. “I love my Broadway, and I take the same route every day, almost every morning, […]

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The Prado Museum’s Unsung Workers Step Into the Limelight

MADRID — Manolo Osuna lacks a formal art education, but he has spent years roaming the galleries of the Prado Museum as a guard and leader of a seven-person moving brigade that hefts national treasures by Spanish masters like Velázquez and Goya around the building. With that homegrown background, Mr. Osuna, 56, has emerged from […]

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Found in the Attic at Gage & Tollner: Historic Treasure

For an individual, it’s almost a cliché of personal discovery: while poking around in Grandma’s attic, you stumble upon a trunk stuffed with long-lost family artifacts. But for a venerable old restaurant — particularly a defunct one carved up over the past 15 years by a costume jewelry store, a tattoo parlor and an Arby’s […]

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What Would a World Without Prisons Look Like?

Vicente Martinez, 18, was apprehensive the first time he visited the former drug house in Syracuse, N.Y. The building had been transformed into the Center for Court Innovation’s peacemaking program, where issues can bubble up and be resolved outside of the traditional criminal justice system. “I was messing up a lot,” Mr. Martinez recalled of […]

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Jan Van Eyck’s Diamond-Hard Brilliance, as You’ll Never See It Again

GHENT, Belgium — God is in the details, they assure you; but some art is so jam-packed with details, each hair so fine, each fold so painstaking, that it surpasses even the divine. Nearly six centuries ago, here in the northwest corner of Europe, the painter Jan van Eyck used a brand-new technology — oil […]

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Notre-Dame’s Crypt and Square May Reopen in Spring

LONDON — The crypt and parts of Notre-Dame Cathedral’s plaza are expected to reopen to the public in the spring, Paris officials said this week — almost a year after the landmark 850-year-old building was mauled by a fire that devoured its roof, weakened its structure and sent shock waves through France and beyond. The […]

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Who Was Carlo Scarpa?

WHEN MARIA CAGNOLI, a 63-year-old rheumatologist from the Northern Italian town of Bergamo, stepped off the elevator onto the top floor of a converted 17th-century Venice palazzo for a satellite exhibition a week before the 2015 Biennale, she had no idea she was about to become a caretaker of history. Even before she could survey […]

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How One Couple Transformed Their Brooklyn Brownstone to Age in Place

When Norman Sussman’s health began to fail a few years ago, he and his wife, Anita Sussman, faced a difficult decision. They wanted to remain in the late-19th-century brownstone in Park Slope, Brooklyn, where they had raised two sons and lived for nearly 40 years. But they knew they needed a space better suited to […]

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How a Convent on a Hill Became a Luxurious Getaway for History Buffs

Anyone who has driven on Route 9 around Peekskill has probably seen what looks like a castle atop a cliff rising 300 feet above the Hudson River. The mysterious area, known as Fort Hill, has a rich history. From a small Native American tribe that had a deep connection to the land there, to George […]

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