Tag: Slavery (Historical)

Episode 4: How the Bad Blood Started

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via Google Podcasts | Via Stitcher Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. On today’s episode: Jeneen Interlandi, a member […]

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Episode 3: The Birth of American Music

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via Google Podcasts | Via Stitcher Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. On today’s episode: ImageThe Motown group the Four Tops in 1966. With more than 40 hits […]

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When Henrietta Wood Won Reparations in 1878

The debate over reparations has re-entered American politics. At congressional hearings, primary debates and across social media many people are talking about what reparations could look like and who might get them. But the story of Henrietta Wood, a formerly enslaved woman who sued for restitution and won is missing from the discussion. Her little-known […]

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Episode 2: The Economy That Slavery Built

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via Google Podcasts | Via Stitcher The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. This episode includes […]

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What’s Going On in the Amazon?

ImageBurning forest this week near Porto Velho, Brazil.CreditVictor Moriyama for The New York Times The emails started arriving last week. “I’ve been waiting to hear about the fires in the Amazon,” wrote Molly Krause, a listener in Aurora, Colo. “It’s a huge problem that is not getting adequate attention. Can you please do an episode […]

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Slavery and the Holocaust: How Americans and Germans Cope With Past Evils

LEARNING FROM THE GERMANSRace and the Memory of Evil By Susan Neiman What can be compared to the Holocaust? Everything? Detention camps on America’s border? Nothing? This history war, generally the province of academics, has recently become part of American political discourse. Into this discussion comes Susan Neiman’s “Learning From the Germans.” Neiman, who has […]

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The Place Where American Slavery Began

ImageRecording the sound of the ocean at Port Comfort, Va., where a ship’s arrival in 1619 set the course for what would become slavery in the U.S.CreditAdizah Eghan/The New York Times Today on “The Daily,” you heard the first episode of “1619,” a new Times podcast hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones on how the legacy of […]

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Glasgow University Pledges Millions for ‘Reparative Justice’ for Slavery Ties

LONDON — The landmark sandstone building of the University of Glasgow stands on land that once belonged to a family of West Indian tobacco merchants who used slave labor on their plantations. Its rectors included Robert Cunninghame Graham, who owned and sold slaves on his plantation in Jamaica in the 18th century. Now, the university, […]

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Liberty and Slavery Have Always Been Wrapped Up With Each Other

I am just one of many contributors to The New York Times Magazine’s 1619 Project and can’t claim to speak for it. But I have found the reaction to the project — or at least, one specific set of reactions — very revealing and worthy of a little analysis. The stated aim of the project […]

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Episode 1: The Fight for a True Democracy

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher “They had been made black by those who believed themselves to be white. And where they were headed, black equaled slave.” Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans […]

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Introducing ‘1619,’ a New York Times Audio Series

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the British colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by […]

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Is Slavery’s Legacy in the Power Dynamics of Sports?

There is no other business like the N.B.A. Its rainbow jump shots, rim-rattling dunks and heart-pounding drama are gleaming monuments to black America. Nearly 80 percent of league players are black. They are multimillionaire superstars, international icons and global purveyors of African-American excellence and culture. Yet, for all of their success, most of them cannot […]

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Sharon Tate Is a Woman in a Tarantino Movie. It’s Complicated.

This article contains spoilers for “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood.” With the arrival of each new Quentin Tarantino film, the mix of collective excitement and dread is palpable. There’s the feel-good anticipation of a guaranteed visual feast, quick-witted exchanges of dialogue, standout performances. And then there’s the concern about which explosive subject he’s […]

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Reading the Hidden Racial Life of American Fiction

WHITE FLIGHTSRace, Fiction, and the American ImaginationBy Jess Row If you were looking for a primer on our nation’s ability to discuss its racial history, you couldn’t do much better than the remarks by the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, on the eve of the House Judiciary Committee’s hearings in June on H.R. 40. If […]

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The Nuns Who Bought and Sold Human Beings

Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School, one of the oldest Roman Catholic girls’ schools in the nation, has long celebrated the vision and generosity of its founders: a determined band of Catholic nuns who championed free education for the poor in the early 1800s. The sisters, who established an elite academy in Washington, D.C., also ran “a […]

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The Trump Strain in American History

President Trump has done nothing for his white working-class voters. His signature tax cut was a giveaway to powerful business interests and wealthy heirs. His trade wars have forced farmers into dire economic straits. His White House is more interested in cutting food stamps than lifting wages. The economy is growing and unemployment is low, […]

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The Case for Keeping San Francisco’s Disputed George Washington Murals

After half a century of intermittent debate and protest, the San Francisco Board of Education voted unanimously in June to whitewash the 13 murals depicting the life of George Washington that line the halls of a high school named for the first president. The murals’ offense is that they depict some ugly truths about the […]

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The Painful Roots of Trump’s ‘Go Back’ Comment

WASHINGTON — Shelley Jackson was 7 years old the first time she heard it. In the early 1970s, Ms. Jackson was among a group of 40 black children who were bused from one side of Los Angeles to integrate a majority-white school across town. One day, a playground squabble ended in a white classmate telling […]

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James Monroe Enslaved Hundreds. Their Descendants Still Live Next Door.

[For more coverage of race, sign up here to have our Race/Related newsletter delivered weekly to your inbox.] CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — So many Monroes in rural Albemarle County remember the moment they asked a parent or grandparent if they were somehow connected to the nation’s fifth president, James Monroe. The telltale entrance sign to Monroe’s […]

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