Tag: Civil War (US) (1861-65)

Why Did U.N.C. Give Millions to a Neo-Confederate Group?

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Late in the afternoon on Thanksgiving Eve, the board of the University of North Carolina System announced that it would give $2.5 million to a neo-Confederate organization to acquire and house a monument known as “Silent Sam.” The monument, topped by a statue of a Confederate soldier carrying a rifle, was […]

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How Did the Gettysburg Address End Up in Glenn Beck’s Office?

Only five known copies of the Gettysburg Address bear Abraham Lincoln’s handwriting. One sits beneath the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Ill., for much of the year, in a vault where the humidity and temperature are tightly controlled. But on June 15, 2018, those two weathered pages could be found in Glenn […]

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Trump Is Too Dangerous for Twitter

It’s almost as if Donald Trump is trying to get impeached. By Twitter, I mean. That’s where the twitchy fingers of the president of the United States have been working overtime to try to get him tossed off the digital communications service by posting all kinds of rule-breaking things and often in all caps with […]

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What Reconstruction-Era Laws Can Teach Our Democracy

THE SECOND FOUNDINGHow the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the ConstitutionBy Eric Foner Why does the brief period known as Reconstruction, a century and a half ago, still influence the state of the Union so heavily? As the eminent historian Eric Foner explains in “The Second Founding,” the failure of the United States “to build […]

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Episode 1: The Fight for a True Democracy

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher “They had been made black by those who believed themselves to be white. And where they were headed, black equaled slave.” Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans […]

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Introducing ‘1619,’ a New York Times Audio Series

Listen and subscribe to our podcast from your mobile device: Via Apple Podcasts | Via RadioPublic | Via Stitcher Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the British colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by […]

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Emmett Till Sign Photo Leads Ole Miss Fraternity to Suspend Members

Three students at the University of Mississippi were suspended by their fraternity on Wednesday after an Instagram photo surfaced of them brandishing guns in front of a bullet-riddled memorial sign for Emmett Till, whose brutal murder in 1955 served as a catalyst for the civil rights movement. The photo of the smiling Kappa Alpha members […]

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What Should Happen to Confederate Statues? A City Auctions One for $1.4 Million

It happened by city decree in the dark of night, or by civic demand at the hands of protesters. When the movement to reckon with Confederate symbols swept the nation, monuments that had long stood in city parks and on college campuses were suddenly dismantled. There was often no clear plan for the future, and […]

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The Daughters of the Confederacy Who Turned Their Heritage to Political Ends

SISTERS AND REBELSA Struggle for the Soul of AmericaBy Jacquelyn Dowd Hall In 1974 Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, a young oral historian, went to Virginia to interview two elderly writers. One occupied a ramshackle rural house and spoke bitterly about the ruin of her literary career. The other, living comfortably in Charlottesville, was immersed in her […]

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A New Lincoln Bible, From a Mantel to a Presidential Library

WASHINGTON — In 1864, Abraham Lincoln made a rare wartime trip out of Washington to visit a charity event in Philadelphia raising money to care for wounded soldiers. He donated 48 copies of the Emancipation Proclamation to be sold for fund-raising. But it turns out he received a gift in return: a Bible whose pages […]

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Is the Religious Right Privileged?

Fair warning: This will be an entire column about a single paragraph. The paragraph’s author is Adam Serwer, a writer for The Atlantic, weighing in on the complicated, sometimes baffling debate on the right about the relationship between religious conservatives and libertarianism … or maybe the relationship between religious conservatives and Donald Trump … or […]

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‘Ship of Horror’: Discovery of the Last Slave Ship to America Brings New Hope to an Old Community

MOBILE, Ala. — Like nearly everyone who grew up in Africatown, Felice Harris had heard the origin story of her little Alabama neighborhood, passed around from relative to relative and house to house. It was the story of a group of West Africans carried to Alabama on the last slave ship to reach the United […]

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