Tag: books

With a New Memoir, Elaine Welteroth Reminds Us That We’re More Than Enough

Elaine Welteroth attends 10th Annual DVF Awards at Brooklyn Museum on April 11, 2019 in New York City. Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris (Getty Images for DVF Awards) She’s known as an arbiter of millennial cool-girl style, but as Elaine Welteroth told Refinery29, she started out just like the rest of us: “a hot mess.” Specifically, she […]

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Who Owns the Crusades?

Is there a historical episode less understood by the general public and more urgently in need of clarification than the Crusades? To some on the right, the Crusades prefigured the modern wars that have been cast as “civilizational” clashes, such as the so-called war on terrorism. That stereotype relies upon a yet broader myth, an […]

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All Over the Map

Jared Diamond doesn’t use a computer. He relies “completely” on his secretary and on his wife for “anything” requiring one, as he puts it. Diamond also confesses that he lacks the ability to turn on his “home television set” and can “do only the simplest things” with his newly acquired iPhone. “Whenever friends have shown […]

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natascha meuser explores zoo buildings in DOM’s latest construction and design manual

written by german architect natascha meuser, ‘zoo buildings‘ marks the latest edition from DOM publishers ‘construction and design manual’ series. the in-depth exploration begins with a question, albeit somewhat rhetorical: despite being a widely popular tourist and leisure destination, how often do we celebrate or consider how zoos are designed? this new book intends to […]

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Is There a Right Way to Cover the Trump White House?

How should reporters cover the White House? Case study number one could be reporter Maggie Haberman of The New York Times, whose work has, during the Trump years, been particularly fraught. Her sympathetic profile of former-Trump-flak-turned-former-White-House-Communications-Director Hope Hicks, torn between obeying a congressional subpoena and obeying her former boss, illustrated the problem quite neatly. Haberman’s […]

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Janaka Stucky Brings a Doom-Metal Mysticism to His Poetry Readings

With his black shirtsleeves rolled up, Janaka Stucky performs poetry readings like he’s part fire-and-brimstone preacher, part doom-metal frontman. “I want the performance to be an initiatory experience,” the poet told VICE. “I want to channel the energy of each performance into conjuring whatever altered state of consciousness I was in when I wrote the […]

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5-Minute Activities to Help You Feel Calmer and More Fulfilled

In the new book 5-Minute Bliss: A More Joyful, Connected, and Fulfilled You in Just 5 Minutes a Day, author and researcher Courtney E. Ackerman shares over 200 simple activities we can do throughout the day. Below are seven 5-minute activities you can try—from practicing visualization techniques to being optimistic to using your imagination. Draw […]

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‘Normal People’ Is Coming to Hulu Because We Can’t Get Enough Millennial Love Stories

Credit: Penguin Random House (left); Simone Padovani/ Awakening/ Getty Images (right) Have you read Normal People yet? Have you been asked if you’ve read Normal People yet? It feels like Sally Rooney’s best-selling novel is everywhere lately. It tells a coming-of-age, millennial love story set in the 2010s, following Irish teenagers Marianne Sheridan and Connell Waldron as […]

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His Master’s Voice

Until his announcement that he would make an on-camera announcement this morning, Robert Mueller has become the J.D. Salinger of federal law enforcement. Since releasing his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election last month—a report that, it should be noted, currently occupies three slots on The New York Times bestseller list, despite being […]

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The Making of the Military-Intellectual Complex

In 1947, two years after the United States emerged victorious in World War II, the 80th U.S. Congress passed the National Security Act, which created the Department of Defense (originally titled the National Military Establishment), Central Intelligence Agency, and National Security Council. Though the nation had demobilized after the war, anxieties about communism quickly permeated […]

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4 Strategies for Staying Creative Amid Burnout and a Bunch of Distractions

Thankfully, however, we aren’t powerless. Thankfully, we can be intentional and proactive, instead of getting dragged around by all kinds of distractions. By applying certain practices and adopting certain perspectives, we can connect to our creativity—and savor more meaning in our lives. In his latest book, Keep Going: 10 Ways to Stay Creative in Good […]

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A Novelist’s Life in America’s Underbelly

The writer Nelson Algren was an American original who, when he died in 1981, left behind a single work of literature that continues to haunt the American imagination. That work is the 1949 novel The Man With the Golden Arm, a book that has come as revelation to a good number of readers in every generation since […]

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Gregor Von Rezzori’s Vast Postwar Masterpiece

If you put a gun to my head and asked me to describe Gregor von Rezzori’s Abel and Cain in three sentences, this is what I would answer: Murder. Murder. Murder. First-, second-, and third-degree: premeditated, unpremeditated, involuntary. Fratricide, sororicide, parricide. Genocide, historicide, deicide. ABEL AND CAIN by Gregor von RezzoriNYRB Classics, 880 pp., $24.95 […]

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