Tag: books

Parker Looks Up: Michelle Obama’s Biggest (and Littlest) Fan Just Published Her First Book

She’s been a viral sensation (more than once), has had a dance party with the forever first lady, and has published her first book—all before the age of five. The adorable little art lover known as Parker Curry can now add “author” to her pre-K resume, as on Tuesday, she and her mom, parenting blogger […]

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Why Did a Georgia School District Ban This #1 Bestseller About Race?

A Georgia school district has blacklisted a bestselling book for teens dealing with race, police brutality, Martin Luther King Jr. and the glare of the white gaze, effectively banning the book from the district’s libraries, curriculum and students who want to learn about race, police brutality, Martin Luther King Jr. and anything other than stuff […]

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Why Did a Georgia School District Ban This No. 1 Bestseller About Race?

A Georgia school district has blacklisted a bestselling book for teens dealing with race, police brutality, Martin Luther King Jr. and the glare of the white gaze, effectively banning the book from the district’s libraries, curriculum and students who want to learn about race, police brutality, Martin Luther King Jr. and anything other than stuff […]

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The Art of the Unspeakable

In 1971, the artist Suzanne Lacy was taking classes with Judy Chicago at the California Institute of the Arts, and she had an idea: What if they created a performance that involved an audience listening to recordings of women telling their stories of rape? It sounds simple now but it wasn’t then, because those kinds […]

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How to Develop a Distinctive Artistic Voice

According to artist and author Lisa Congdon in her new book Find Your Artistic Voice: The Essential Guide to Working Your Creative Magic, your artistic voice is ultimately “what makes your work yours, what sets your work apart, and what makes it different from everyone else’s—even from artists whose work is similar.” Your artistic voice […]

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Women and ADHD: Changing Destructive Self-Talk

Why am I so stupid? I’m too sensitive. Why am I so lazy? Everyone else can do this without any problems. Why can’t I?   I’ll never accomplish that. How does she get everything done?   Many women with ADHD wake up with these kinds of thoughts, and they follow them throughout the day. Perhaps […]

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The Nobel Prize in Literature Is Just Trolling Now

After a one-year absence brought on by an ugly and convoluted sexual abuse and financial malfeasance scandal, the Nobel Prize in Literature returned in 2019 with a charm offensive. The Swedish Academy’s Nobel Committee would bestow not one, but two awards, to make up for last year’s no-show. And it promised that, after a period […]

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Olga Tokarczuk’s Gripping Eco-Mystery

Murder mysteries, however else they might differ, rely on one major, shared belief: that murder matters, and is worth looking into. Whoever did the killing, whoever was killed, the investigation moves forward because the people inside the story and those outside of it, following along as the clues unfold, agree that the murder has moral […]

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Who Will Win the 2019 (or the 2018!) Nobel Prize in Literature?

Two years ago, when the Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to Kazuo Ishiguro, the institution appeared to be in the midst of an evolution. After decades of stubborn and curmudgeonly devotion to unheralded writers and capital L literature, the Swedish Academy changed its approach, awarding new modes (Svetalana Alexievich’s hybrid of fiction and nonfiction […]

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3 Simple Pointers for Becoming a Calmer Parent

In those moments, it’s hard not to lose your cool. Which, of course, is putting it mildly. It’s actually really hard not to flip out and transform into the Incredible Hulk, huffing and puffing, and screaming your brains out. But these freak-outs don’t have to be regular, inevitable occurrences. We can learn to be calm—at […]

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The MAGA Plot

Ben Lerner writes novels about Ben Lerner. This sentence might have once sounded like a criticism. But since writing that collapses the distance between fiction and author—so-called autofiction—is au courant, it is nearer an endorsement. The hero of Lerner’s debut novel, 2011’s Leaving the Atocha Station, is a poet named Adam Gordon. He’s anxiety-ridden, callow, and […]

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How Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Novel Reckons With the Past

Eight years ago, Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote an essay in The Atlantic asking why so few black people studied the Civil War. Coates noted that he himself had only recently become an avid reader of Civil War history, and along with it, a student of the larger system that propelled it into motion: slavery. The reason for […]

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Librarian Finds Returned Book with Entire Soft Taco Used as Bookmark

For several days last week, Brand Twitter entertained itself by suggesting which foods and beverages could theoretically be poured into the pages of whatever book you’re reading. “Don’t have a bookmark? Try using Chex Mix instead,” the Chex Mix account suggested, posting two photos of a hardcover that had been filled with its own combo […]

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IT: Chapter Two and the Great American Tradition of Selling Native Spirituality

There’s laziness, there’s racism, and there’s lazy racism. About 45 minutes into IT: Chapter Two, which remained atop the box office last weekend, the three-hour movie reveals it’s aiming for the latter.  For this sequel to the 2017 film, Argentinian director Andrés Muschietti was tasked with interpreting an epic, and epically weird, work. Like with most adaptations, there was […]

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What Christine Blasey Ford Said

It has only been one year since Christine Blasey Ford appeared on Capitol Hill and for a time was the focal point of national attention, as one of the newly visible faces of the #MeToo movement. But just weeks before that, Ford couldn’t get a Washington Post reporter to call her back on her tip […]

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