Tag: Interview

Faces of MIT: Lydia Brosnahan

A lot of behind-the-scenes work goes into creating an art installation or a theater production – not just by those making or performing their craft, but also by the staff members who coordinate the logistics of exhibits and events. One of the people at MIT who helps artists bring their projects to life is Lydia […]

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3 Questions: Why study theater in a German language class?

Emily Goodling is a lecturer in German in Global Languages at MIT. She teaches class 21G.411 (Conflict, Contest, Controversy: A Literary Investigation of German Politics), a course that she developed with the help of an MIT Global Languages Consortium for Language Teaching and Learning (CLTL) Innovation in Language Pedagogy grant in summer 2023. With the […]

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3 Questions: Paloma Duong on the complexities of Cuban culture

As a state run by a Communist Party, Cuba appears set apart from many of its neighbors in the Americas. One thing lost as a result, to a large extent, is a nuanced understanding of the perspectives of Cuban citizens. MIT’s Paloma Duong, an associate professor in the program in Comparative Media Studies/Writing, has helped […]

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MIT junior Justin Yu crashes “Tetris,” with thanks to the game’s recent “space race”

Fans of classic “Tetris” have a lot to celebrate at the moment: On Dec. 21, 2023, player Willis Gibson (who plays under the handle BlueScuti) advanced so far into a game of “Tetris” that the game froze: a new achievement in the classic game, which is played on a Nintendo Entertainment System console. Gibson’s win […]

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Even the Kremlin Is Fact-Checking Tucker Carlson Ahead of Putin Interview

Screengrab via @TuckerCarlson on X Former Fox News host Tucker Carlson is hyping up an interview with Vladimir Putin, which will be the first one-on-one interview the Russian president has given a Western journalist since his country invaded Ukraine in 2022. In the lead-up to the interview, there has been such a surge in misinformation […]

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3 Questions: What can graduate students expect from MIT’s newest grad housing option?

In October 2017, MIT made a commitment to add 950 on-campus beds for graduate students as part of the Volpe zoning agreement with the City of Cambridge that allows the Institute to develop a 10-acre parcel in Kendall Square. Since then, MIT opened the Graduate Tower at Site 4 residential community in Kendall Square with […]

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Q&A: What sets the recent Japan earthquake apart from others?

On Jan. 1, a magnitude 7.6 earthquake struck the western side of Japan on the Noto Peninsula, killing over 200 people. Japan is prone to earthquakes, including a magnitude 9.1 earthquake in 2011 that triggered a tsunami and killed almost 20,000 people. William Frank, the Victor P. Starr Career Development Professor in the Department of […]

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Q&A: A blueprint for sustainable innovation

Atacama Biomaterials is a startup combining architecture, machine learning, and chemical engineering to create eco-friendly materials with multiple applications. Passionate about sustainable innovation, its co-founder Paloma Gonzalez-Rojas SM ’15, PhD ’21 highlights here how MIT has supported the project through several of its entrepreneurship initiatives, and reflects on the role of design in building a holistic […]

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3 Questions: Renaud Fournier on transforming MIT’s digital landscape

Renaud Fournier SM ’95 joined the Institute in September 2023 in the newly established role of chief officer for business and digital transformation and is leading a team focused on simplifying business operations and systems for the MIT community. Fournier has extensive experience implementing systems and solving data challenges, both in higher education and the […]

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3 Questions: Implementing the MIT Graduate Student Union’s collective bargaining agreement

When eligible MIT graduate students voted to be represented by a union in April 2022, the decision set in motion significant changes in the graduate student ecosystem at the Institute. Moving forward, graduate students in the Graduate Student Union (GSU)’s bargaining unit — about 3,500 research assistants, teaching assistants, and instructors-G — will be represented […]

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3 Questions: A new home for music at MIT

More than 1,500 students enroll in music classes each year at MIT. More than 500 student musicians participate in one of 30 on-campus ensembles. In spring 2025, to better provide for its thriving musical program, MIT will inaugurate its new music building, a 35,000-square-foot three-volume facility adjacent to Kresge Auditorium. The new building will feature […]

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Black Twitter, Black Hollywood Reacts to Jaw-Dropping Katt Williams Interview with Shannon Sharpe

24 hours since Katt William’s explosive interview on Shannon Sharpe’s “Club Shay Shay” podcast set the social media streets on fire on Wednesday, reactions have been pouring in at monumental levels. The Roots’ Black Thought On Befriending Questlove & Classmates Boyz II Men & Others In New Memoir Off English If you’ve somehow missed the […]

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3 Questions: Darrell Irvine on making HIV vaccines more powerful

An MIT research team led by Professor Darrell Irvine has developed a novel kind of vaccine adjuvant: a nanoparticle that can help to stimulate the immune system to generate a stronger response to a vaccine. These nanoparticles contain saponin, a compound derived from the bark of the Chilean soapbark tree, along with a molecule called […]

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3 Questions: Melissa Nobles on combating antisemitism and Islamophobia

On Nov. 14, President Sally Kornbluth launched Standing Together Against Hate (STAH), a community-driven initiative coordinated by Chancellor Melissa Nobles. The initiative will support efforts led by MIT faculty, staff, students, and the administration to come together, MIT-style, to use our problem-solving skills to address antisemitism, Islamophobia, and other forms of hate. Chancellor Nobles spoke […]

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3 Questions: Laura Beretsky on living and learning with epilepsy

Do you have a disability? It’s a question every employer is required to ask job applicants. Some people quickly check a box and move on. For Laura Beretsky, deciding how to answer the question is more complicated. Beretsky, who works as a grant writer in the MIT Introduction to Technology, Engineering, and Science (MITES) program, […]

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3 Questions: Wiebke Denecke on a landmark project for Chinese literature

Nuns writing fine poetry. Centuries-old joke books. An epic travelogue ending with a visit to Genghis Khan. These are just a few things readers can experience through the new Hsu-Tang Library of Classical Chinese Literature, published by Oxford University Press. The series is modeled on the Loeb Classical Library, which debuted in 1912 and features […]

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Q&A: Phillip Sharp and Amy Brand on the future of open-access publishing

Providing open access to scholarly publications is a long-running issue with new developments on the horizon. Last year, the U.S. federal government’s Office of Science and Technology Policy mandated that starting in 2026 publishers must provide open access to publications stemming from federal funding. That provides more impetus for the open-access movement in academia. Meanwhile, […]

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Liberty Ladd: Going above and beyond

Liberty Ladd has been drawn to public service and fighting injustice from a young age. At 15, as a student representative from the first congressional district of Maine, she testified to the state board of education about unfair grading policies at her school. Later, she decided to join the Air Force, with the understanding that […]

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3 Questions: A roadmap toward circularity in the footwear industry

In March 2022, representatives of global footwear brands gathered with sustainability experts and other academic researchers on the MIT campus. The mission? To kick-start a discussion on addressing the waste produced by the footwear industry. An MIT research project arising from the Circular Shoe Systems Summit has now resulted in a white paper titled the […]

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MIT’s Justin Yu wins Classic Tetris World Championship

If you have 59 seconds to devote to pure joy, you won’t regret watching this video clip of Justin “Fractal” Yu, an MIT junior who, on Oct. 15, became the top classic Tetris player in the world by winning the 2023 Classic Tetris World Championships. The computer science and engineering major from Dallas, Texas, plans […]

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Q&A: Magnifying research impact with policymakers

The MIT Policy Lab at the Center for International Studies works with researchers across the Institute to develop and enhance connections between the worlds of academia and public policy. Led by Associate Professor Chappell Lawson, who serves as faculty director, and Drew Story, who serves as managing director, the MIT Policy Lab has supported over […]

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Controversial game designer Peter Molyneux wants to prove that not ‘everything I say is a promise that’s going to be broken’

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from Peter Molyneux, the mind behind the original Fable and Theme Park games, whose experiments with blockchain games and other shortcomings around promises made have seen his reputation take a few hits over the years. Perhaps worst of all, this is the man that promised us acorns that […]

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3 Questions: What should scientists and the public know about nuclear waste?

Many researchers see an expansion of nuclear power, which produces no greenhouse gas emissions from its power generation, as an essential component of strategies to combat global climate change. Yet there is still strong resistance to such expansion, and much of that is based on the issue of how to safely dispose of the resulting […]

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Q&A: The BRICS expansion and the global balance of power

In early September, the BRICS group of countries with emerging economies — an informal alliance among Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa — announced it would expand its ranks by six nations. Argentina, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and UAE are now set to join the BRICS group in the near future. This would […]

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3 Questions: A new PhD program from the Center for Computational Science and Engineering

This fall, the Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), an academic unit in the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing, is introducing a new standalone PhD degree program that will enable students to pursue research in cross-cutting methodological aspects of computational science and engineering. The launch follows approval of the center’s degree program proposal at […]

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3 Questions: The first asteroid sample returned to Earth

On Sunday morning, a capsule the size of a mini-fridge dropped from the skies over western Utah, carrying a first-of-its-kind package: about 250 grams of dirt and dust plucked from the surface of an asteroid. As a candy-striped parachute billowed open to slow its freefall, the capsule plummeted down to the sand, slightly ahead of […]

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Dave the Diver’s director on the breakout indie hit of 2023

We’re thrilled to announce the return of GamesBeat Next, hosted in San Francisco this October, where we will explore the theme of “Playing the Edge.” Apply to speak here and learn more about sponsorship opportunities here. At the event, we will also announce 25 top game startups as the 2024 Game Changers. Apply or nominate today! While 2023 […]

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3 Questions: How are cities managing record-setting temperatures?

July 2023 was the hottest month globally since humans began keeping records. People all over the U.S. experienced punishingly high temperatures this summer. In Phoenix, there were a record-setting 31 consecutive days with a high temperature of 110 degrees Fahrenheit or more. July was the hottest month on record in Miami. A scan of high […]

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3 Questions: A bigger, better space-ripple detector

The search for space-shaking ripples in the universe just got a big boost. An MIT-led effort to build a bigger, better gravitational-wave detector will receive $9 million dollars over the next three years from the National Science Foundation. The funding infusion will support the design phase for Cosmic Explorer — a next-generation gravitational-wave observatory that […]

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Faces of MIT: Abisola Okuk

Senior staff accountant Abisola Okuk’s role has changed a lot since she first came to MIT back in 2014. She started in the Media Lab as an administrative assistant, then moved to the MIT Sloan School of Management’s external relations team, and is now senior staff accountant in the Office of the Vice President for […]

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Q&A: Steven Gonzalez on Indigenous futurist science fiction

Steven Gonzalez is a PhD candidate in the MIT Doctoral Program in History, Anthropology, Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS), where he researches the environmental impacts of cloud computing and data centers in the United States, Iceland, and Puerto Rico. He is also an author. Writing under the name E.G. Condé, he recently published his first book, […]

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