Tag: health care

AI system prioritizes x-rays by urgency

Radiologists are drowning in x-rays. The electromagnetic scans account for a whopping 40 percent of all diagnostic imaging worldwide, and in the U.K. alone, there are an estimated 330,000 x-rays at any given time that have waited more than a month for a report. Fortunately, artificial intelligence (AI) promises to shrink the backlog substantially. In […]

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3 Ways Trump Could Disrupt Health Care for the Better

Yves here. Recall that in his post on his French health care and magical snotty snails, Michael Olenick mentioned in passing that pharmacists in France can prescribe medications for routine ailments, unlike their US counterparts. I would not be that keen about the “let patients shop better” were it not for the appalling opacity of […]

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The Planetary Health Diet Isn’t Much Use to People Living in Food Poverty

Yves here. Mass market food producers have not been good actors in promoting a healthy diet. Among other things, adding sugar to products makes them taste better and “snacks, drinks, and processed foods that are high in sugar have the highest profit margins.” By Anya Pearson, a freelance journalist and editor, and guitarist in feminist […]

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Researchers develop flexible nanobots to deliver drugs inside your body

What comes to mind when you hear the word “robot”? Boston Dynamics’ quadrupedal Spot? SoftBank’s humanoid Pepper? Or flexible, practically microscopic devices that can swim through bodily fluids? It probably isn’t the last of those three, but that’s the one that might someday deliver life-saving drugs to the hard-to-reach places inside your body. In a […]

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GoFundMe CEO: ‘Gigantic Gaps’ In Health System Showing Up In Crowdfunding

By Rachel Bluth, Reporter for Kaiser Health News and Peggy Girshman Fellow. She was previously the lead political correspondent for the Annapolis Bureau of Capital News Service and has also written for the Maryland Reporter and the Prince George’s Sentinel. Originally published at Kaiser Health News Scrolling through the GoFundMe website reveals seemingly an endless […]

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Microsoft’s M12 venture fund expands to India, invests in health care data startup Innovaccer

India’s startups raised a record $10.5 billion in funding last year from dozens of international and local investors. When they are in need for capital again, they will have an additional source to look at: Microsoft. Microsoft announced today that it is expanding the reach of its M12 corporate venture fund (formerly known as Microsoft […]

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Micheal Olenick: Helicidine – French Miracle Snails

Yves here. If anyone takes up this idea, please remember Naked Capitalism (as in at least send me some of the stuff)! Remember, the US bars reimportation, as in ordering US drugs via Canada. Importing foreign drugs doesn’t fall into that category (so personal use is fine, getting approval for commercial resale is probably not […]

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Why the Green New Deal Is the Stuff of Fantasyland

Yves here. I’ve been disappointed by the cheerleading over the Green New Deal. Its claim is that if we mobilize enough resources, we can convert to a renewable-energy-based economy and arrest the rise in greenhouse gases soon enough to prevent the worst global warming outcomes. That might have worked if we had started 20 years […]

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Mortality, Medical Coding and the (Purported) Drop in Hospital Readmission Rates

By Lambert Strether of Corrente The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) originated with a 2007 report to Congress from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the agency within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that administers Medicare and works with the states to administer Medicaid, among other things including ObamaCare. From […]

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Health Insurer Greed or Desperation? An Odd Data Point From Cigna

I sometimes give personal Consumerist-type anecdotes about dodgy vendor behavior in case readers have had similar experiences. Admittedly, health insurers being difficult about paying claims is so common that they fall in the realm of “dog bites man” stories. But the elements of my latest arm-wrestle with Cigna suggest that the insurer is so eager […]

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The Mysteries Surrounding Rhodes Pharmaceuticals, the Sackler Family’s Second Opioid Company

By Roy Poses, MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Brown University, and the President of FIRM – the Foundation for Integrity and Responsibility in Medicine. Originally published at Health Care Renewal Mysteries still abound in the not so wonderful world of health care dysfunction, so, quick, the game’s afoot… Today’s mysteries involve beneficial ownership.  […]

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Kiss What Is Left of Your Medical Data Privacy Goodbye

Matt Stoller warned back in 2012 that insurers would increasingly induce, then force, customers to agree to surveillance. But a Wall Street Journal story tonight describes how insurers and medical providers, meaning your doctor’s employers, are actively cooperating, so as among other things, to help Big Pharma peddle more drugs to you. Stoller warned that […]

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Should Institutional Providers Be Incentivized by Profit under Medicare for All?

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. I’ve avoided writing about hospitals and other institutions, because my focus has always been on the patient, and whether they get, or don’t get, health care under our horrid mixed system of Medicaid, private insurance, and Medicare (subject to a neoliberal infestation though it may be). However, as Medicare for […]

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New Study Finds Emergency Personnel Less Likely to Treat Pain for Black Patients Than White Ones

Photo: iStock Racial disparities in health care are a well-documented phenomenon, spanning every area of medicine from the birthing room to the ICU. Now, a recent study shows yet another place black people are treated differently from nonblack patients: the back of an ambulance. In a study reported by NPR, researchers found emergency medical technicians […]

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The Fight To Save Independent Health Care in the Age of Medical Monopolies

From the outside, the New Mexico Cancer Center looks like any other outpatient clinic: Each week hundreds of cancer patients travel to the nondescript tan and turquoise building in an Albuquerque office park just off the interstate for tests and treatments. But unbeknownst to many of them, it has become a flashpoint in a legal […]

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What the US Could Learn from Thailand About Health Care Coverage

By Joseph Harris, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Boston University. Originally published at The Conversation The open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) draws to a close on Dec. 15. Yet, recent assaults on the ACA by the Trump administration stand in marked contrast to efforts to expand access to health care and medicine […]

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Toxic Philanthropy? The Spirit of Giving While Taking

Yves here. Homer had this figured out long ago: “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts.” But the press has done a great job of presenting squillionaires trying to remake society along their preferred lines as disinterested philanthropy. By Lynn Parramore, Senior Research Analyst, the Institute for New Economic Thinking. Originally published at the Institute for New […]

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Without Obamacare Penalty, Think It’ll Be Nice To Drop Your Health Insurance? Better Think Twice

Yves here. This post is a reminder that for most people in the US, health insurance is an exercise in exploitation thanks to the catastrophically costs of hospitalizations and certain medications. For instance, a leukemia survivor I know takes a drug that cost $14,000 a month to keep the cancer from recurring. By Emily Bazar, […]

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