Tag: World Health Organization

Measles Cases Continue to Rise Around the World

There has been a rapid increase in the global measles outbreak, with reported cases jumping 300 percent in the first three months of 2019 compared with the same period last year, according to the World Health Organization. As reasons for the increase, the organization has cited a deep mistrust of vaccines, gaps in immunization coverage […]

Read More

To Drive Down Insulin Prices, W.H.O. Will Certify Generic Versions

With insulin prices skyrocketing and substantial shortages developing in poorer countries, the World Health Organization said on Wednesday that it would begin testing and approving generic versions of the drug. Agency officials said they hoped to drive down insulin prices by encouraging makers of generic drugs to enter the market, increasing competition. At the moment, […]

Read More

Rapper T.I.’s Daughter Should Never Have Had a ‘Virginity Test’

The rapper and actor T.I. prompted widespread outrage after revealing on a podcast that he accompanies his 18-year-old daughter to a doctor’s appointment each year to insure that her hymen is still intact. Scientists have long condemned so-called virginity testing as a violation of a woman’s rights, as well as a sham procedure unsupported by […]

Read More

New Delhi, Choking on Toxic Air, Declares Health Emergency

NEW DELHI — A toxic, throat-burning cloud has settled over India’s capital, swallowing national monuments, sending people to emergency rooms and prompting officials on Friday to declare a public health emergency and close schools for days. Air pollution in parts of New Delhi rose to levels around 20 times what the World Health Organization considers […]

Read More

New TB Vaccine Could Save Millions of Lives, Study Suggests

In what may be a watershed moment in the fight against tuberculosis, the world’s most lethal infectious disease, an experimental new vaccine has protected about half the people who got it, scientists reported on Tuesday. While a 50 percent success rate is hardly ideal — the measles vaccine, by contrast, is about 98 percent protective […]

Read More

Panic in Pakistani City After 900 Children Test Positive for H.I.V.

RATODERO, Pakistan — Nearly 900 children in the small Pakistani city of Ratodero were bedridden early this year with raging fevers that resisted treatment. Parents were frantic, with everyone seeming to know a family with a sick child. In April, the disease was pinned down, and the diagnosis was devastating: The city was the epicenter […]

Read More

Two Strains of Polio Are Gone, but the End of the Disease Is Still Far Off

In another milestone on the long, expensive and sometimes discouraging road to wiping out polio, global health officials announced Wednesday that two of the three strains of wild polio virus have officially been eliminated. Although that brings the world another step closer to eradication, the effort has taken far longer than was ever anticipated. When […]

Read More

An Environmentally Friendly Firecracker? India Is Willing to Try.

ROHTAK, India — Diwali is the Hindu festival of light, and during the height of the celebrations in India each autumn, much of that illumination is coming from barely controlled explosions: the firecrackers, sparklers and other fireworks that millions here love to ignite as night falls. But beyond the light, it all adds fumes and […]

Read More

W.H.O. Continues Emergency Status for Ebola Outbreak in Congo

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is still a public health emergency and will be one for at least the next three months, the World Health Organization said on Friday. At the same time, “We believe we are on what could be a bumpy road to zero” new infections, said Dr. Michael […]

Read More

Australia Just Had a Bad Flu Season. That May Be a Warning for the U.S.

Australia had an unusually early and fairly severe flu season this year. Since that may foretell a serious outbreak on its way in the United States, public health experts now are urging Americans to get their flu shots as soon as possible. “It’s too early to tell for sure, because sometimes Australia is predictive and […]

Read More

A Simple Regimen Can Prevent TB. Why Aren’t More People on It?

Tuberculosis struck 10 million people worldwide in 2017, killing 1.6 million of them — a toll greater than that of H.I.V., malaria, measles and Ebola combined. TB is the leading infectious killer around the globe; nearly 1.8 billion people are carrying the bacterium that causes the disease. The world is sorely in need of new […]

Read More

Health Experts Fight Ebola in Congo, and Each Other

[Like the Science Times page on Facebook. | Sign up for the Science Times newsletter.] In the urgent struggle to stop the Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo, doctors are rolling out powerful vaccines and lifesaving antiviral drugs, but the year-old outbreak, mired in violence among warring militias, is now caught between expert […]

Read More

How Anti-Vaccine Sentiment Took Hold in the United States

The question is often whispered, the questioners sheepish. But increasingly, parents at the Central Park playground where Dr. Elizabeth A. Comen takes her young children have been asking her: “Do you vaccinate your kids?” Dr. Comen, an oncologist who has treated patients for cancers related to the human papillomavirus that a vaccine can now prevent, […]

Read More

Philippines Declares Polio Outbreak After 19 Years Free of the Disease

MANILA — The Philippines on Thursday announced an outbreak of polio, 19 years after the World Health Organization declared the Southeast Asian country free of the infectious disease. Health Secretary Francisco Duque said government scientists have confirmed the “re-emergence of polio” after one case in the southern province of Lanao del Sur and another suspected […]

Read More

W.H.O. Warns of ‘Dramatic’ Rise in Measles in Europe

LONDON — Measles has returned to four European countries this year amid a “dramatic resurgence” in the disease on the continent, the World Health Organization said on Thursday, a reversal fueled in part by a rising wave of people who are refusing to be vaccinated. The number of cases in the first half of the […]

Read More

This Daily Pill Cut Heart Attacks by Half. Why Isn’t Everyone Getting It?

Giving people an inexpensive pill containing generic drugs that prevent heart attacks — an idea first proposed 20 years ago but rarely tested — worked quite well in a new study, slashing the rate of heart attacks by more than half among those who regularly took the pills. If other studies now underway find similar […]

Read More

Notre-Dame Construction Resumes in Paris, but Worries About Lead Remain

PARIS — Construction resumed at the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris on Monday, weeks after authorities had shut the site down over worries about lead contamination linked to the fire in April. The work restarted with stricter decontamination measures in place, but amid concerns that authorities still weren’t doing enough to contain the blaze’s toxic fallout. […]

Read More

Ebola Could Be Eradicated — But Only if the World Works Together

The global health community got a few pieces of hopeful news this week. On Monday the World Health Organization announced that two newly developed intravenous drug therapies appear capable of curing Ebola. The medications could help end a continuing epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where nearly 2,800 people have been infected over the […]

Read More

Scientists Discover a Cure for the Deadliest Strain of Tuberculosis

TSAKANE, South Africa — When Tsholofelo Msimango joined a clinical trial of new tuberculosis drugs, she was 20 years old and weighed just 57 pounds. Stricken with a deadly strain of tuberculosis, Ms. Msimango was terrified. She was to be transferred to Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital in Johannesburg. The nurses in the township here told […]

Read More

Two New Ebola Treatments Prove Highly Effective in Congo Epidemic

Two experimental treatments to treat Ebola infection work so well that they will now be offered to all patients in the Democratic Republic of Congo, scientists announced Monday. The antibody-based treatments are so powerful — “Now we can say that 90 percent can come out of treatment cured,” one scientist said — that they raise […]

Read More

Ebola Outbreaks Are About Inequality

Living conditions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s eastern province of North Kivu were already precarious when the first cases of Ebola were reported there last July. Only eight days earlier, officials had declared an Ebola outbreak on the western side of the DRC over. Suddenly, World Health Organization officials faced an outbreak they […]

Read More

Where Rabies Is Entrenched

Rabies has been known since antiquity, and has been completely preventable since Pasteur developed a vaccine more than a century ago. But the World Health Organization still considers it “a neglected disease of poor and vulnerable populations.” Why? Rabies, one expert has written, “became a neglected disease when it was eliminated from Europe and North […]

Read More